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    • Blaveloper

      Came here to advertise? Read first   12/05/2016

      Over the last few months, there's been a huge increase of members coming here just to advertise their own products, services, or whatever.
      This is fine, but the "General Discussions" section is not the right place. If you came here to advertise anything you made or provide yourself, do this here.
      If you came here to advertise anything you love to use, do it here. Thank you for your understanding. And remember: anything we consider spam is subject to the ban hammer. Any smash is available free of charge.

Wanda Kaishin

Moderator
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Wanda Kaishin last won the day on November 14

Wanda Kaishin had the most liked content!

About Wanda Kaishin

  • Rank
    Language Enthusiast

Converted

  • Currently studying
    Tagalog
  • Native tongue
    English
  • Fluent in
    it depends on what you mean by fluent

Recent Profile Visitors

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  1. I'm enjoying all the Spanish and English loanwords. I'll be visiting the Philippines after only 3.5 months of study, so it will be interesting to see how easy it really is.
  2. Kamusta or Kumusta?

    I've seen both "kamusta" and "kumusta" in written form, but it sounds more like "komusta" to me.
  3. I just started learning Dutch, what should I do?

    Welcome! Have you checked this out? http://www.learndutch.org/
  4. Studying the IPA

    First, I think it's pretty cool and brave of you to post a video about this here. The video was really nicely done, and your English is quite fluid. You have a way to go on pronunciation, but it's great that you are working on it. I have very strong opinions about how pronunciation should be integrated into a language learning plan. 1) The first thing you should do when learning a language is to master the alphabet and pronunciation of the phonemes, the smallest units of sound, in the language. Always listen before pronouncing for the first time, and listen periodically to check yourself. This is also the correct time to start listening to the language in general on a regular basis, just please don't do any reading, writing or conversing at this point or it can forever mar your pronunciation. 2) Then it's time to learn the pronunciation of words and sentences. I recommend listening to and repeating lots of native sentences. Pimsleur is perfect for this, but there are many other options. Ideally, after you've become comfortable listening to and repeating a sentence many times, you can read that sentence out loud, which marks the beginning of your reading component in a language. Only read stuff for which you've already mastered the listening and pronunciation at this point. After putting in many hours, and working on thousands of sentences this way, your pronunciation should be pretty good. 3) It's now safe to do anything you want with the language without seriously damaging your pronunciation. Continue to read out-loud as much as possible. Periodically check your own pronunciation, first by paying attention to it when you converse, second by recording it and checking it yourself, finally by asking for a native speaker's input. Keep doing this periodically, and you'll almost certainly have excellent pronunciation in the target language.
  5. That's true. I stand corrected.
  6. English

    Some people like A.J. Hoge, and just use his free videos to get enough comprehensible input. You might be better off hiring italki tutors or finding free language exchange partners.
  7. Yes, you explained yourself correctly, I just wasn't sure what that term meant. As for the topic, here's an example. Northern Chinese speakers (Harbin, Beijing ,etc) pronounce the r similar to how it's pronounced in US and Canadian English, so they have an easier time imitating those accents than the British accent. But I don't know if it's easier to understand for this reason. I also don't know if it makes a big difference or a small difference. Are those other examples made up, or have you read something that supports those similarities? It's somewhat interesting to me.
  8. What do you mean by "in a phonetic level"? I ask because then you go on to imply Scottish English is more similar to Italian than other forms of English, South African English is more similar to Spanish and Canadian English is more similar to Chinese. This doesn't click to me, but I'm interested in your explanation.
  9. I think they are both pretty cultural; not sure if it's possible to say one is more than the other.
  10. No, but it's a lot more messed up than that. Cases, verbs of motion, aspects, etc.
  11. I actually think the best person to answer this is you. You might try checking out job opportunities in the fields you're interested in. After getting a few leads, perhaps invade a few forums that are inhabited by expatriates to find out if they're happy, if their salaries are reasonable, etc. The only other thing I'll say is that Russian was quite difficult for me, mainly due to its grammar. Of the languages I speak, Chinese and Japanese were the hardest to learn by far, Thai and Russian were tied in third, Korean was fifth. Swahili, French and Spanish were all about the same, and I would guess approximately as difficult as German for an English speaker.
  12. Japanese and Spanish I want.

    Welcome! I speak both languages and can say they are well worth the effort.
  13. feek.live

    I've never tried it. I normally use skype, sometimes zoom or telephone chat apps like viber, whatsapp, etc.
  14. It's hard to advise because I don't know what age you lived in France, and what age you are now. But for starters, immerse yourself in the language as much as possible outside of school. Practice conversing with an italki tutor on skype, or a free language exchange partner. Watch French films, read French books, write a little in French every day, or maybe text your teacher/language partner. Do that for a while, and you will eventually recover your old level. How long it takes to reach "fluency" depends on your definition of "fluency" and a lot of other things, so I can't guess without a lot more information. Good luck!
  15. You say "this is just a choice" without telling us why you want to learn it. Unless we know, it will be pretty hard to advise. If there really is no preference, maybe choose the easiest one for you, which would probably be the one you've had most exposure to.