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czarina84

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  1. Like
    czarina84 got a reaction from Saholy in Rap Around the World   
    I like to use music to learn languages.  One of my favorite types is hip-hop/rap.  We have many types here:  Gangsta, Crunk, Dirty South, etc.  What types of rap do you have in your country?  Who are some of the artists you know?  Are they underground or mainstream? 
  2. Like
    czarina84 reacted to Trellum in Rap Around the World   
    My country is not known for their R&B inspired genres, but some neighboring countries from Latin America are know for their own   There is a genre that is R&B inspired and that is the ''Reggeaton''.   I never liked it to be honest.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
  3. Like
    czarina84 reacted to linguaholic in "Murder" idioms   
    Well, I am not sure about it but I think I heard people saying things like: "This beat is murder", meaning that this beat is really great/good. I wonder if other people can actually confirm this use of 'murder' or not.


  4. Like
    czarina84 reacted to OmniHead in Rap Around the World   
    In México, rap is often confused with hip-hop and reggaeton.
    Personally I didn't know there was different sub-genres of rap, and frankly amazes me this rhythm is so popular today, when it was practically ignored 32 years ago, when the movie "Breaking'" came into the mainstream back in 1984.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_pzk83luwo
  5. Like
    czarina84 reacted to DivaDee in Rap Around the World   
    Well, since I live in America, but the problem is that, here in America is that most of rapping nowadays is about sex, drugs, money and the "thug life", some of the artists are actually trying to break the stereotype and rap about something else, but in the end it doesn't help, I mostly listen to J/K/C-Pop, but that doesn't mean I don't listen to normal rap, but only good songs (but that's just me).... 
  6. Like
    czarina84 reacted to jamesbonner in Rap Around the World   
    In my country, most of the RAP is underground, there is only few mainscreen rappers only, I can name one of them which is considered as my country RAP godfather, he been rapping since 1996 till today, it's name Lotfi DK I adore rap music and that's all what i listen to 
  7. Like
    czarina84 reacted to aleshc in Rap Around the World   
    In Slovenia we don't really differentiate the types of rap/hip-hop, it's just that. We have a couple of artists who are considered mainstream, but I prefer those that are more underground, or better said that they have their own label and work hard to build it up. You have rappers that are known locally but also nationwide, since it's such a small country. Italian rap, lately there's been quite an addition of rappers to the mainstream scene, but there's still independent labels who try to make it. Some labels already made it big by singing with Universal and such. My favorites are probably Fabri Fibra (which is one of the most well known artists in Italy), Salmo, Gemitaiz, MadMan, to name a few...
  8. Like
    czarina84 reacted to Wanda Kaishin in Rap Around the World   
    Check out Idaho Ness
    This guy is probably the world's most famous rapping polyglot.
  9. Like
    czarina84 reacted to lushlala in Rap Around the World   
    We have a few local 'rap artists' but somehow the rap just comes over a little contrived to me. I don't think my language lends itself to rap at all. In fact, there are languages that I feel make rap music very unappealing. I personally prefer it in English, in particular American English. Even some British rappers fail miserably to pull it off LOL 
  10. Like
    czarina84 reacted to watangaboy in Rap Around the World   
    Here in Uruguay we have a lot of underground artists. I don't particularly enjoy most of the musicians in the hip-hop scene but I support the movement and any type of music/genre. The most famous one (in the country) is called LaTejaPride* (La Teja is a neighbourhood in the city of Montevideo) and I think they are good. They talk about life, the streets and I think they try to give a really positive outlook on life. Their genre would be more of a blend with old school hip-hop, with a DJ, and modern hip-hop (newer sounds and technology).
    There is also a really famous band which is more on the side of Rap Metal that is called Peyote Asesino ("Killer Peyote"), similar in sound to Molotov (mexican band). They don't have a positive vibe and are really aggressive in their lyrics and music. They are known in south america but are not active anymore.
  11. Like
    czarina84 reacted to MyDigitalpoint in Is The Spanish Language Really Related To Italian?   
    Spanish and Italian are very similar, but Portuguese also has many similar words and can be easily understand it by Spanish speaking people and vice versa, though Italia is best understood.

    Reason is that these languages share a same Latin root, which also comprises the French language despite this has none resemblance with any of the above.
  12. Like
    czarina84 reacted to Yessica11 in Pronounciation   
    I actually just finished up a research paper about pronunciation and accents for my graduate program.
    The relationship between accent and pronunciation is completely inseparable.  For English, the two most taught accents are Receive Pronunciation (Queen's English) and General American.  Typically learners like to focus their English studies on a popular accent and learn that pronunciation.  It's hard for someone who is a NS of English to not teach towards their own accent, but I think it's important to expand your students' input in the classroom from one general accent to others.  Perhaps the other accents could include some fluent NNSs and other NS accents.  If you don't expose them to these other pronunciations, could it harm their learning? That's not necessarily proven, but it's good to walk into a classroom with the concept of English being an International Language and not one that is bound to a certain group just because that's where you learned to pronounce it.
    I'm geeking out over here.
  13. Like
    czarina84 reacted to Chris_A in Pronounciation   
    Pronunciation is by far one of the most important things that you should master when learning a new language. Apart from the fact that words could have different meanings when not pronounced correctly, not pronouncing words correctly is also a giveaway that you are not really fluent in a certain language and should practice more. Only through practice can you master pronunciation.
  14. Like
    czarina84 reacted to Butterfly2015 in Pronounciation   
    Well said! I agree 100% I'd just like to add that with pronunciation, repetition is the key. Listen to your native speaking source (video, audio, or actual native speaker) and repeat and compare to the native speaking source. Repeat and compare. Repeat and compare. Just like an actor practicing for an accent specific role.  Once you are confident that you sound as close as you possibly can, then repeat the phrase over and over again until you feel comfortable with it and it just rolls off of your tongue.
  15. Like
    czarina84 reacted to NATASHA in Pronounciation   
    It is important to learn how to pronounce words because sometimes the way words are said could mean something completely different or you will find people still don't understand you. To do this it is a good idea to get a video or sound clip of words that you have troubles with so that you are able to play back and repeat what you are hearing.
  16. Like
    czarina84 reacted to Wanda Kaishin in Has Anyone Used Michel Thomas To Learn a Language?   
    You are right to look elsewhere for learning pronunciation. But his pronunciation isn't so bad to the point where it isn't understandable. 
  17. Like
    czarina84 reacted to 宇崎ちゃん in Has Anyone Used Michel Thomas To Learn a Language?   
    @czarina84 I could perhaps recommend you to find random YouTube videos in your target language.
    They may perhaps not be intended to teach you languages, but real world videos are still the best way to learn the right pronunciation, as long as you 'shadow' their pronunciation.
    Each time I learn a new language, I make sure my pronunciation gets as close to a native speaker as I can get, I'm therefore very specific with this (I speak Australian English, so I try to copy an Australian person as closely as I can).
    Copying pronunciation correctly will be hard at first (especially since you hear yourself differently than other people hear you), but the good news is, you can get used to it pretty damn quick.
  18. Like
    czarina84 reacted to Wanda Kaishin in Has Anyone Used Michel Thomas To Learn a Language?   
    A bit of a warning here. While Michel Thomas's accents aren't bad, they aren't native. He has been criticized for this, and for giving pronunciation tips that aren't correct/helpful. I believe he's a native Polish speaker. This doesn't affect me, because I learn my pronunciation elsewhere before ever listening to his course. I like to compartmentalize my learning, so I'm only trying to get grammar out of them.
  19. Like
    czarina84 reacted to sidney in Is it easy or hard to learn Spanish just from listening to people talk?   
    My dad claims that he has roughly learned how to speak basic Visayan (a local dialect) just by listening to his officemates speak Visayan. So I guess that it's possible learn any language just by listening to other people talk. After all, you can learn and absorb new words thru constant repetition.
  20. Like
    czarina84 reacted to SpringBreeze in Is it easy or hard to learn Spanish just from listening to people talk?   
    I think it is hard to learn any language that way. It's possible, but it's not really the best way. Learning a new language isn't just about being able to communicate, it's also about learning grammar, proper sentence structuring, legitimate vocabulary versus colloquial vocabulary, and etc. If you think about it, we speak differently than how we would write an essay for a teacher or a memo for work. Also we speak differently to our friends and family than how we would to our bosses.
  21. Like
    czarina84 reacted to Tearradh in Is it easy or hard to learn Spanish just from listening to people talk?   
    I think both would help too. In Spanish class they do teach you the proper way to speak and write in Spanish. But when you actually talk to someone, just like any language, there is definitely going to be things that they do not teach you. With English there are a lot of sayings and things now, that a person who isn't fluent, would not understand.
  22. Like
    czarina84 reacted to True2marie in Is it easy or hard to learn Spanish just from listening to people talk?   
    I did learn Spanish from a combo of going to school and taking a course and being around Spanish-speaking people.

    Both help.

    The great part about being around Spanish-speaking people is that they help you learn slang. Slang is typically not taught in Spanish classes. They also don't teach - at least in America - Castillian.
  23. Like
    czarina84 reacted to pandandesign in Is it easy or hard to learn Spanish just from listening to people talk?   
    I think it is difficult to learn any new language just from listening to people talk, not to mention Spanish. I would think people need to learn the basis of the language and practice their reading, speaking, and writing skills, not only listen to people talk. Well, at least I cannot do that because I wouldn't understand of any word they say.
  24. Like
    czarina84 reacted to BWL in Qu'est-ce que c'est   
    "Qu'est-ce que c'est?" is just a typical French way to say "What is this?" The French like complex sentences like this (just kidding) that would make no sense in related languages like Italian and Spanish.

    This type of sentence structure is very common even in spoken French, Est-ce que tu as faim? Is a slightly more polite but still colloquial way to say "Are you hungry?" (literally, "Is it that you have hunger?"). You could also say "Tu as faim?" or even "T'as faim?" but it would be brusque and can even be impolite when spoken in the wrong intonation and to the wrong people.


  25. Like
    czarina84 reacted to linguaholic in Qu'est-ce que c'est   
    It just simply means "what is this?". :grin:

    You can use this phrase in all kind of situations? For instance, if your friend has something in his hand and you don't really know what it is you can just say: Qu'est-ce que c'est?
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