Jump to content
Linguaholic

Is this valid for the English language 'win special armor'


Recommended Posts

I was writing something out and someone said that 'You can win special armor!' as a line is incorrect. They stated that it should have an article, aka 'You can win a special armor!'


To me, both in this case are correct. I know you can't 'win special weapon', and the article would be removed only when it's a plural in this case, aka 'win a special weapon'/'win special weapons'.

If the above 'win special armor' is correct, why is that? Is there a rule or logic to why that works in this case and sounds correct? 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 months later...
1 hour ago, TeacherMichelleF said:

"Armour" is an uncountable noun and so doesn't need an article. Weapon is a countable noun, so it does need an article. For example, you could say "an apple" or "a song" but not "a water" or "a music" because water and music are uncountable. 

Does that make sense?

I didn't even notice the countable vs uncountable part!
Much like how "less" and "fewer" works right?

I actually thought that "armour" would be countable?
Of course you can only wear 1 at a time, but you can have a closet with a couple of them I suppose.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, basically.

"suit of armour" is countable. You would wear a suit of armour but not an armour. It's like having a glass of water instead of a water or a piece of luggage instead of a luggae.

I agree that it sounds a little confusing.If a countable noun (suit, glass, piece) goes first then there's nothing in the sentence to tell you that the uncountable noun is uncountable. This can be a bit tricky, I agree.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, TeacherMichelleF said:

Yes, basically.

"suit of armour" is countable. You would wear a suit of armour but not an armour. It's like having a glass of water instead of a water or a piece of luggage instead of a luggae.

I agree that it sounds a little confusing.If a countable noun (suit, glass, piece) goes first then there's nothing in the sentence to tell you that the uncountable noun is uncountable. This can be a bit tricky, I agree.

I thought of "armour" as the suit itself already.
When I think of water, I'm thinking of the liquid, not the glass.
When I think of luggage, I think of the whole thing rather than it being in pieces.

Maybe that's where it went wrong?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...
The popup will be closed in 10 seconds...