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Linguaholic

Have you taught English in a foreign country?


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I remember teaching English in a foreign country is a good career and the pay is much bette than if you teach English in a foreign country. However, the difference is that people don't speak the way American people speak because they learn English different in foreign countries. I have a customer who teaches English in Eastern China, which was different because no one spoken English with him. He taught them to speak with him, which I think it was amazing how people don't speak English at all ended up spending English with him a few years later. Has anyone taught English in a foreign country? How was your experience?

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  • 4 weeks later...

I have my certificate to teach English and I have done a few classes with some of the children in my village. I found it hard because the students were more interested in translating Spanish to English. They didn't really want to learn the language, just how to say different things. Also, it was their parents who wanted them to learn English so they would skip class or come a couple hours late. Eventually, I said enough is enough and they stopped coming.

I would like to do more classes at some point. I'd really love to do online teaching but our internet is very poor here so I'd need to have an office in the city. That's something I'd have to look into next year as I will have my permanent residence card and can legally work without going through a lot of red tape.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I taught English in Taiwan for a year and it was a great experience. You earn a living wage and get to explore new places everyday. Having said that, I wouldn't be able to be there for too long as an English teacher. The students don't appreciate you, they kind of see you as a joke. Also, your bosses see you as expendable because you can be easily replaced. Not only that, there isn't much room for upward movement. The wage you get in your 7th year won't be much than when you started.

It's a great experience though and highly recommend going abroad for at least a year.

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I love the idea of teaching English in Japan, though I read a blog from someone who did it through the JET Program that was a bit of a horror story. The kids were hellions, pretty much, and did things like try to put their fingers in the teacher's butt as a kids' game.... I've heard from others that it was a great experience though, so I'm pretty unsure. I never did it myself, though I'd probably take the opportunity if I had it.

I suppose you would have to know the culture. Personally, I'd want to teach middle school or older kids. It sounds rewarding and fun.

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  • 2 months later...

I love the idea of teaching English in Japan, though I read a blog from someone who did it through the JET Program that was a bit of a horror story. The kids were hellions, pretty much, and did things like try to put their fingers in the teacher's butt as a kids' game.... I've heard from others that it was a great experience though, so I'm pretty unsure. I never did it myself, though I'd probably take the opportunity if I had it.

I suppose you would have to know the culture. Personally, I'd want to teach middle school or older kids. It sounds rewarding and fun.

The thing about putting fingers in butt......it's called "kancho".

It's suppose to be a type of prank in Japan, but yeah......it's very nasty.

I always love hearing about people teachings in another country and eventually learn more about the difference between their cultures. I wish I got the chance to teach overseas as well in the future.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've experience teaching English in Mexico.  Not easy at all, specially when the students are aware you speak Spanish as well. Because then they'll want you to speak English to them, even if that's bad for their learning experience.  That was such a hard thing to do, because every day we had as a goal not to use Spanish at all, in an attempt to actually try to immerse the students in the language even more.

This was my main goal, sadly when you started with a new group you had to try to fix said group, because some teachers didn't care at all about using Spanish in class!  So I had to try to fix that, which is super hard if you are teaching teens or kids...

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I have my certificate to teach English and I have done a few classes with some of the children in my village. I found it hard because the students were more interested in translating Spanish to English. They didn't really want to learn the language, just how to say different things. Also, it was their parents who wanted them to learn English so they would skip class or come a couple hours late. Eventually, I said enough is enough and they stopped coming.

I would like to do more classes at some point. I'd really love to do online teaching but our internet is very poor here so I'd need to have an office in the city. That's something I'd have to look into next year as I will have my permanent residence card and can legally work without going through a lot of red tape.

Ugh, the same thing happened to me!  Isn't that sad?  You're trying to help their kids to do something good that will surely help them get ahead in life, but they just see this as some way to get rid of them for a few hours!  Completely frustrating.  I often talked with my student's parents, but eventually I stopped, because I know it was like talking to a wall.

I often complained about some kids waning to use Spanish during the class or not obeying my orders.  There was this one teenage girl who wouldn't do what I told her.  It's a tough profession to be an independent teacher... no doubt about it!

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No, but I would like to. Even though it probably is a challenging experience, I think it would be good for building character because not only will you get to learn a lot about a foreign country and its language, but also you get to learn a good amount about yourself for teaching others as well.

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  • 2 months later...

I am a certified TESOL teacher, and most of my teaching now is online. However, I lived in Moscow, Russia for two years and taught English while I was there. I had private students - both children and adults - and I also taught in three different schools. Two were public schools, and one was a very exclusive private school for the ultra-rich who live in new communities just outside of Moscow. In one class, there was a small boy who was called the son of "the Bill Gates of Russia."

I loved it, and miss Moscow every day. It was an awesome experience. I would love to return, or teach abroad in another country.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I'm not a teacher but the idea I have as a student that have gone through English classes in a foreign country after knowing how to speak fluently is that they teach very basic English, even on more advanced years/classes. People have to learn from zero and therefore lack the basics so they have to go slow and sometimes it takes time for everyone in the class to be ready for the next step.

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I would love to teach English in a foreign country when I finish my studies! Even though I am fluent in British English, I would have a hard time getting a job since I'm not a native speaker. Even Britons without an English degree would get hired faster than me. I think I will have to get a British certificate if I want to teach abroad.

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I always hoped to be able to do such a job. I looked into it a few years ago but met a lot of dead ends and scams. I guess my other problem is I focused on Western Europe like Spain and Portugal. There seems to be less need there. And their economic decline doesn't help at all.

I have heard of jobs in Asia. But to be honest, these positions scare me. Do any of you know of anyone doing this over there with a blog? I'd love to read what it's like and see pictures.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I remember teaching English in a foreign country is a good career and the pay is much bette than if you teach English in a foreign country.

What? :)

Anyway, I did. Just finished recently. I went to China. And now I've got the travel bug and the desire to make this a career. I want to visit many countries.

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I have tried teaching basic English to kids in my own country. It doesn't pay tat well, but I found out that kids grab the basic concepts more easily than an illiterate adult. They are much easier to teach and guide.

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  • 2 months later...

I'm into the Korean culture and learning the Korean language, so I have thought about teaching English there before. I think I changed my mind because I don't really have the skills to be a teacher, but I would love to see the cute kids' little faces every day!

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  • 1 year later...

 

The thing about putting fingers in butt......it's called "kancho".

It's suppose to be a type of prank in Japan, but yeah......it's very nasty.

I always love hearing about people teachings in another country and eventually learn more about the difference between their cultures. I wish I got the chance to teach overseas as well in the future.

I teach Japanese students online and they're usually polite and circumspect. I can't imagine them doing that! Haha. But I guess it's different when it's face-to-face and there's daily interaction. I'm planning on applying for the JET programme, but after reading about that, I'm having second thoughts!

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  • 5 months later...

I've wanted to do this for some time, but never had the chance or got around to it, nor would I know where to start! I reckon I would prefer to teach children over adults though because they'd be more likely to be willing to learn and also have a better grasp of it.

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I have always wnted to do this and I know that the Walt Disney company is looking to pay people to go abroad and teach English. I just don't think that I would adjust well and my boyfriend just got a good job in the states so I am not up for travelling right now. If I were a little younger and unattached then that is something that I would want to do. 

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I haven't, I'm a web- and game developer.
However, since lots of other people are web- and/or game developers too, I'm struggling to find a job for 4 years now (and ongoing).
For that reason I decided to study to become an English teacher through home studies (but with an internationally recognised bachelors degree afterwards).
And I'm hoping to work in Japan after getting this degree.

I didn't start yet, since my application is still pending as we speak.

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I have the opportunity to if I want, primarily as a mentor. I'm not really interested in that, but it seems reasonably lucrative so I might consider it a little bit down the road. It's not something I see myself doing though. 

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  • 3 weeks later...
On 28.04.2016 at 8:09 AM, Blaveloper said:

I haven't, I'm a web- and game developer.
However, since lots of other people are web- and/or game developers too, I'm struggling to find a job for 4 years now (and ongoing).
For that reason I decided to study to become an English teacher through home studies (but with an internationally recognised bachelors degree afterwards).
And I'm hoping to work in Japan after getting this degree.

I didn't start yet, since my application is still pending as we speak.

Really? I have been studying English Philology from 8 months to teach English in Japan (or maybe in Thailand) too. :)

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2 minutes ago, Voytek said:

Really? I have been studying English Philology from 8 months to teach English in Japan (or maybe in Thailand) too. :)

Yeah, and I gave up after just looking at the lesson material. :P
Good thing I had a 14 day money back guarantee, I would have been fucked for 4 years otherwise.

Yes, I still have plans to move to Japan, but I'll just stick with my web- or game developer career instead, preferably self-employed.

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8 minutes ago, Blaveloper said:

Yeah, and I gave up after just looking at the lesson material. :P
Good thing I had a 14 day money back guarantee, I would have been fucked for 4 years otherwise.

Yes, I still have plans to move to Japan, but I'll just stick with my web- or game developer career instead, preferably self-employed.

Yeah, studying English at university sucks but I want to have a diploma because it might help me to get a job, but, actually, I`ve heard that if you have degree it`s enough to get a job in Japana or Thailand. of course,m you must be fluent. :)

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