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How Long Does It Take You To Learn A Language?


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Honestly speaking, how long would it take you to learn a language from zero to fluently speaking? But not just speaking, we should include reading and writing to this post. Is it  a 1 year or 2 year project or plus, to really immerse yourself and understand a language fully?

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I think that learning a language takes at least oe year or two as you say, sometimes more depending on the intensity of your studies.

If you go live in a country and you're studying the language daily I'd say that after three or six months you can already communicate.

If you are in your country taking classes twice a week and that's it so it might take two years or longer...

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It took me 6 months to start building phrases that made sense in english.  Not bad I learnt this language on my own. It took me 1 year to gain fluency in the spoken form, and 2 years to almost master it.  I'm currently on then process to master it.  I just need to work on my weaknesses, like for example expanding my vocabulary and learn new phrasal verbs.

I'd say learning a language is a lifelong process, because once you learn it you have to keep on using it so isn't lost! If you don't, then it will be lost! 

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I think that learning a language takes at least oe year or two as you say, sometimes more depending on the intensity of your studies.

I agree with this wholeheartedly.  I find that the more I am forced to not speak/think in English, the easier it is for me to integrate the target language into my mind.  I am able to review everyday objects around me in Spanish often, which doesn't happen if I'm constantly surrounded by English speaking individuals.  I do try to do this at University often.

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A few years ago I made two friends that can from Moldova do work here in Portugal. They knew nothing from the language and only after a couple of months they could speak the language. That is what necessity and being in the country do to a person, I'm not saying it's easy, but it's faster this way when you literally live for it.

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Yeah I have noticed that when you are in a country you learn the language faster. The more I'm in England, the worse my Portuguese gets. But when I'm in Portugal or surrounded by a lot of Portuguese speaking individuals, then I learn faster and better.

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I think that 2 to 3 years would be the ideal time to learn a new language, but I think that it only covers fluently speaking the basic words and fluently forming sentences and writing them, especially if you're living in your native country because there's no immersion for you.

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It depends on your attitude, where you are and the time you spend learning the language. If for example you meet people who speak the language you're learning regularly and get a chance to hear it used [and for you to practice using it] within two years you'll be fluent enough to speak like a native albeit with an accent.

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Well, I've just started learning Spanish. Looking at how things are going at the moment, I would say it would take me a year to be proficient in the language.

I agree that it all depends on how much effort one puts into it.

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It depends on how hard I work. It also matters significantly where I'm living. If I'm living in a place where the dominant language is the language I'm learning, obviously that helps me way more to absorb as much as possible. I also spend a lot of time building vocabulary lists and memorization cards, etc. to make the words stick. I try to listen to music in that particular language as well. Reading a lot, even if you're starting with children's books in the beginning, will help you also. If you really work at it, I think you could be fluent in about a year, but that's pretty difficult.

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It really would be a matter of how much dedication I was putting into learning the language. If I were to fully immerse myself in a new language, I would say six to eight months. However, if I wasn't immersed in it, I believe that it would take years for that new language to really take hold.

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It is not easy to learn a new language and it needs more time and effort and constant practice for you to be able to express the language. Right now I am just in the initial stage of learning a new language and I have to be serious because I really want to learn it well and to be fluent with the language.

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Learning another language should be continuous if one wants to really improve on his level like for instance learning English. The ability to learn the language fast and effectively for non-native English speakers depends on the individual himself and there is no definite time duration before one can say he is already fluent. :)

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