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Tagalog words that are rarely used nowadays.


What should you use in this sentence? Question) 나는 그를 만나(거나/이나) 도망갈 것 이다  

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  1. 1. What should you use in this sentence? Question) 나는 그를 만나(거나/이나) 도망갈 것 이다

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Let's talk about Tagalog words that you don't often hear people say nowadays.

Napagtano (to realize something) - this is a word you would only encounter in text books as people would just normally say "napagisip-isip".

Marikit (beautiful) - the often used term is "maganda". Just try saying marikit to describe a pretty woman or something beautiful and you would see people staring at you like you are a weird person.  :laugh:

Dulay (to climb) - "umakyat" is the word that is usually used to describe this verb.

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  • 1 month later...
Napagtano (to realize something) - this is a word you would only encounter in text books as people would just normally say "napagisip-isip".

Nice topic. :)

Actually it's "Napagtanto" not "Napagtano" (but I guess it's just a typo error.  :grin:)  Also, I'm not very familiar with "Dulay".  Maybe it's a local dialect?

Anyway, from my own observations, here are some of the Tagalog terms that are currently not being used in casual conversations and maybe can be found only in Tagalog poems.

1. Sapagkat >> translation "because".

2. Sapantaha >> I think the closest translation for this word is "intuition".

3. Busilak >> referring to something "pure" or "white" or "kind".  I guess it depends on the usage.  :confused:

I'm not an expert so feel free to correct me anytime.  :grin:

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  • 2 months later...

Here's a few more to add to the list:

labaha - razor

durungawan - window (I have to admit I usually just use bintana)

piging - party (I thought this one was hilarious, it sounds like a body part and not a party to me)

sambat - fork (Apparently tinidor is not that formal/old)

:wacky:

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Here's a few more to add to the list:

labaha - razor

durungawan - window (I have to admit I usually just use bintana)

piging - party (I thought this one was hilarious, it sounds like a body part and not a party to me)

sambat - fork (Apparently tinidor is not that formal/old)

:wacky:

I usually refer to a razor as "pang-ahit".  :grin:  "Sambat" is really new to me, can you tell it's spoon counterpart?

Anyway, here's two more...

>> Kalupi - a "wallet" in English ("pitaka" is usually use than kalupi).

>> Alimusom - "scent" in English ("amoy" is mostly use than alimusom.)  :smile:

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Here's my humble addition:

-Alumpihit - I can't remember the exact meaning, but I usually associate this with feeling or being bothered

-Naninibugho - means feeling jealous

-Panimdim - means a deep sense of loss

-Arok - means to understand

-Salumpuwit - means chair

And I probably shouldn't continue anymore, since this conversation would likely turn weird. Haha.

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Nice posts @ang.diwata.  :smile:

I believe "alumpihit" means "restless".  Like when you're worried about something or when you feel pain and doesn't know what to do.  Now we usually say "hindi mapakali" instead of alumpihit. 

"Salumpuwit" is really funny, very literal.  :laugh:

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Hey, thanks! Actually, if you'd read tagalog pocketbooks, some of the old authors use these rarely-used tagalog words.  :smile:

Salumpuwit is probably the most innocent of those 'salum-' words. Haha. Somebody once asked me what's the tagalog word for panties, brief and bra, and I literally laughed out loud.  :laugh:

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  • 4 weeks later...

This one's a funny thread because when you think about saying these things now, you'd look so old school. Let me share with you some more.

1. Tampalasan - traitor (we now use 'traydor' or 'manloloko', sometimes even just 'hayop' or 'siraulo', just kidding hehe)

2. Salipawpaw - airplane (now it's just 'eroplano')

3. Batalan - washroom (now 'banyo')

4. Kubyertos - spoon & fork (this is definitely shorter than saying 'kutsara at tinidor', don't you think?)

5. Katipan - boyfriend or girlfriend (even nobyo/nobya is rarely used nowadays, syota is still used somehow)

:laugh:

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  • 1 month later...

Nice list. I only remember the words "naatasan", which means to be assigned, and "naitala" which means to list things down. I think it would be nice if we try to revive these words by using them more often in public, lol. It might make a comeback, you know?

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  • 2 weeks later...

I usually refer to a razor as "pang-ahit".  :grin:  "Sambat" is really new to me, can you tell it's spoon counterpart?

Anyway, here's two more...

>> Kalupi - a "wallet" in English ("pitaka" is usually use than kalupi).

>> Alimusom - "scent" in English ("amoy" is mostly use than alimusom.)  :smile:

To be honest I have no idea what the spoon counterpart of sambat is! These words are so archaic and it's so hard to find resources mentioning them. Anyway, I found those words in an old textbook and it probably also has a spoon counterpart but I can't seem to find it. Argh, I hate when I want to find something out and it's one of those rare occasions that the internet can't help. lol

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  • 3 months later...

This is a nice thread that reminds me of the words used by my grandparents before. :D

I remember my grandfather used to tell me to buy "pomada" in the store which I think is gel in English (correct me if I am wrong if the pomada is a brand :P)

Some other words that I think are seldom used are:

batugan - lazy

marikit - beautiful/pretty

magiting - heroic

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Why was the word for climb 'Dulay' changed into such a confusing to remember word like umakyat? It seems much easier to pronounce and spell if the first word had been kept. Maybe it's still used in books but not commonly said in speech or something akin to that?

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Why was the word for climb 'Dulay' changed into such a confusing to remember word like umakyat? It seems much easier to pronounce and spell if the first word had been kept. Maybe it's still used in books but not commonly said in speech or something akin to that?

I haven't heard of the term dulay before. Maybe it's from another dialect? The word umakyat is a very common word in the Filipino language. Only sounds confusing since you're not a native speaker.

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  • 3 years later...

I'm not really good with deep tagalog words because i'm just 14 but I'm working on it now. Btw, here's what I know:

• Marimacha- A girl who acts like a boy
• Siphayo- sadness.
• Agam-agam- hesitation; doubt.
• Lamukos- to crush; crumple.
• Mapanglaw- gloomy.
• Palalo- arrogant.
• Pusikit- dark.
• Lingap- concern; care.
• Pantyon- Cemetery
• Sansinukob- World
• Pagdadahop- Poverty


• Maniniyut- Photographer

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3 hours ago, asymptote said:

I'm not really good with deep tagalog words because i'm just 14 but I'm working on it now. Btw, here's what I know:

• Marimacha- A girl who acts like a boy
• Siphayo- sadness.
• Agam-agam- hesitation; doubt.
• Lamukos- to crush; crumple.
• Mapanglaw- gloomy.
• Palalo- arrogant.
• Pusikit- dark.
• Lingap- concern; care.
• Pantyon- Cemetery
• Sansinukob- World
• Pagdadahop- Poverty


• Maniniyut- Photographer

Thanks for sharing asymptote!

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