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Language Success linked to Love For Reading


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Do you love reading? Do you think that only persons who love to read do well in English exams and challenges? I know a few people who do remarkably well in writing and speaking English, yet they are not avid readers. I love to read though. It's what accounts for my success with the language so far.

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Do you love reading? Do you think that only persons who love to read do well in English exams and challenges? I know a few people who do remarkably well in writing and speaking English, yet they are not avid readers. I love to read though. It's what accounts for my success with the language so far.

Well, when an individual loves something, he or she will find him/herself spending most of their time doing that something. So, I don't find myself doing a lot of reading, which translates to mean that I don't really love reading. I don't have a problem if I get a reading assignment however. I'm up for it. I still think I do well in my English reading and writing though.
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I agree, and I'd almost contest that both are almost symbiotic, by which I mean a love for reading will most likely increase your language skills and having more knowledge of a particular language might also encourage one to read more. I can only speak from personal experience, though, as I read a lot of comics when I was younger and I attribute a lot of what I now know about English and English grammar to it, and it in turn has also made me want to read even more comics until I grew up and moved on to actual predominantly literary books.

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Indeed many people choose to learn a language either because they want access to more reading material, or they want to read material it its native languages. Many students of the ancient languages learn so that they can read great works in the languages that they were composed.

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I can see the link between the two. People who are avid readers are more likely to read in different languages. They are probably more likely to pick up a few language books and check them out. I also think that they read quickly and so they can quickly absorb information.

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Yes, to a certain extent. Loving to read does help to improve ones language. Reading is great for expanding ones vocabulary. Also, people are known to excel in the things they love so when one loves to read, naturally they'll be good at the language.

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In order to write well one must read regularly. There are no two ways about this. By write well I mean knowing how to manipulate words and phrases to put forth an idea is an appealing/catchy manner. Only through reading can we really learn the ways of language, learn how different authors write. It's amazing how the same thing can be said in so many different ways! Also reading helps in expanding your vocabulary which then improves your writing.

However, if you're not into writing seriously I don't think not reading will make that much of a difference. If you speak the language regularly that should help you know enough to write decently. But then again, between reading and not reading, the former is ALWAYS a more sensible and obvious advice.

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From my personal experience, reading does help tremendously in improving one's language skills. I read I used to be an avid reader in high school, and always received good grades for my English exams. Essay-writing was easier for me because I have a wider range of vocabulary to fall back on.

Of course, doing the love for reading also makes language-learning an enjoyable experience. As such, you're more likely to find success.

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I actually don't. I would rather listen to my professor than read. I find it that what we hear or I hear is the most effective way of remembering things. Only when I'm interested in things, thus I read and it really retains. I guess it is a matter of interest.

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Reading helps with learning how the language is actually used without the constraints of rules and other few technical facets of learning a language that make it seem difficult. Exposure to written material that observes the rules without sign posts [that tell you the learner] that some grammar rules has been broken etc, makes you be more "natural" because in real life, no one bothers about grammar as long as you get your point across.

Yeah, reading definitely does help you learn a language faster. 

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