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Favorite Idiom


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"It ain't over till the fat lady sings" :wink:

History: The phrase is generally understood to be referencing the stereotypically overweight sopranos of Grand Opera. The imagery of Richard Wagner's opera cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen and its last part, Götterdämmerung, is typically the one used in depictions accompanying reference to the phrase. The "fat lady" is the valkyrie Brünnhilde, who is traditionally presented as a very buxom lady with horned helmet, spear and round shield (although Brünnhilde in fact wears a winged helmet[1]). Her aria lasts almost twenty minutes and leads directly to the end of the opera, though the character Hagen has one final line, "Zurück vom Ring!", to sing after Brünnhilde's death, and there is also a substantial orchestral finale.[2] As Götterdämmerung is about the end of the world (or at least the world of the Norse gods), in a very significant way "it is [all] over when the fat lady sings."

Source: Wikipedia.

So, cheer up and never lose hope.  :happy2:

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:love: "Labor/labour of love"

Doing something (project/task) for the sake of pleasure or interest rather than the reward/payment.  :kiss:

Raining cats and dogs

Of course, everyone knows this one.

20_raining_cats_and_dogs_concept.png

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  • 4 months later...
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Bury the hatchet.

This idiom is used in cases where people may be at odds with each other. To bury the hatchet means that you put all the enmity aside and move on.

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One I like is, "Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater." It simply means don't throw away something valuable or desirable along with something undesirable.

A few years ago, an email was circulating with the subject line "life in the 1500's." It contained some ridiculous explanations as to the origins of some popular idioms, and this one was included. Here is what is said:

In the 1500's, water was difficult to obtain, so people shared bathwater. By the time the last member of the family (the baby) was bathed, the water was so dirty and murky, there was a danger of throwing the baby out with the bathwater because you wouldn't even be able to see him.

This is, of course, complete nonsense.

There are many websites that offer explanations of the origins of idioms, and you have to be careful. Many of them contain such "spook etymologies" which just aren't true. If an idiom has been in use for many years, it is often impossible to track down the origin of it. By the time the idiom makes it into print somewhere - a book or newspaper - it has probably been around for several years already, maybe even decades. Since the people who first started using the phrase are unknown and lost to history, it's just not possible to discover the origin.

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I've always loved, '"Yeah, he's crazy. Crazy like a fox."

  It might be because I heard it in the movies, but it also kind of just resonates with me and the way I think about, and go about, life.

  It means, to be unconventionally clever. To do things that seem quite mad, or nonsensical, which prove to be very wise in the final analysis.

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I mentioned it in another thread, but this one is from the American South. (And as far as I know, a small area of it at that.) I like it the most because it is so unique:

The devil is beating his wife.

That means it is raining. Haha.

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My favorite without a doubt has to be the common 'Back Seat Driver'. Its something I have to use at least once a week, especially with friends who still haven't got their driving license. Actually its worse when they know driving. Unless I play some music and distract them, it is almost as if their words are going to drive my car, and I am in a lot of pain when that happens.

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My favorite idiom is "talk is cheap". It means that it is easier to say that you will do something than to actually do it. (Saying this in response to someone who promises you something implies that you do not believe that person will keep the promise.)

I also have my own version of it and I insert that idiom when I argue with someone whom I know is lying to me.

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One of my favorites is "cat's meow", because for one thing, I am very into cats, and second it just sounds very whimsical and old, which kind of makes it comical but in a very positive way. I doubt many people still use it nowadays but whenever I do hear someone use it, even ironically, it makes me feel very pleased.

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It is raining cats and dogs is one of my favourites because I have never understood what it actually means but it sounds good and it seems to work. Another one would be there are plenty of fish in the sea. A good one for heartbreak.

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I also like the "Blessing in Disguise" cause there are just things that we thought are not too good but just saving us from the worst.

Some other idioms that I really like are "action speaks louder than words, barking at the wrong tree, bread and butter and cross the bridge when you get there".

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"Ignorance is bliss", meaning that as long as you don't know something, you don't have to be worried about the implications of that something, which in the end means "happiness" for the one that doesn't know. I use it all the time.

Another one I like is "A wolf in sheep's clothing", for people who pretend to have good intentions when they actually will try to harm you. For some reason, I have a very vivid image, from maybe a movie or a book, of a wolf disguised as a sheep.

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A favorite of my own is the use of "the bee's knees". It means something is high in quality or is very very good. The rough origin is from bee farmers. Bee's carry the large amount of pollen on their knees, and of course , the more the better.

This then became the saying, "this is the bee's knees!!" Or this is awesome!

Another I like is "a dime-a-dozen". This is a very popular term from american movies, as a dime is 10 cents.

The idiom explain the amount of something being so high, that it is rather worthless. For instance, a dime a dozen singer, means that at the moment, the market for a singer / entertainer is so flooded that you could get 12 (a dozen) of the from one dime (10 cents), which is very cheap when one looks at it as such!

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You catch more flies with honey than with vinegar!

I like this saying because of how easy it is to catch on to what it implies and is usually one of the first idioms a person will come across and understand when learning the English language. It's also a helpful hint when it comes to dealing with people.

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"Ignorance is bliss", meaning that as long as you don't know something, you don't have to be worried about the implications of that something, which in the end means "happiness" for the one that doesn't know. I use it all the time.

Another one I like is "A wolf in sheep's clothing", for people who pretend to have good intentions when they actually will try to harm you. For some reason, I have a very vivid image, from maybe a movie or a book, of a wolf disguised as a sheep.

Ignorance is bliss is practically my life motto. I think it also applies to language learning (at time) too. Like if you don't know your word choice is wrong or your accent is horrible, you speak it more because you're not insecure, and gradually become better :grin:

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I have been hearing this English idiom since I was a child, "Let bygones be bygones." I think we should all practice this one into our lives. Let's forget about the past, and be reconciled. Life is way too short to hold grudges against other people. Be happy and move forward.

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The idiom "what goes around, comes around" is one of my favorites, much like the Golden Rule.  If you do good things in life as well as doing good unto others, you will be rewarded with many more good things;  If you do evil, you will reap your deserved punishment someday.

I likewise encounter "talk is cheap," especially when dealing with sleazy vendors and unscrupulous merchants who want to sell their substandard goods to unsuspecting customers.

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My favorite idiomatic expressions would have to be the following:

  • "Come hell or high water" - I like this expression because it sounds so avant-garde. 
  • "Through thick and thin" - This is the same as saying "for better or for worse," which means you'd be there for someone no matter what happens.
  • "Every cloud has a silver lining" - A very hopeful, profound and poetic expression you'd want to use on a whim.
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I sometimes dream about living in an ivory tower. Yet society offers the best school of hard knocks. We all get our share of weal and woe in life. Therefore I'll try to make the best of things and make hay while the sun shines.

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