Jump to content
Linguaholic
Accredited Online TEFL

Learning a new language with pictures


Recommended Posts

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. I remember when I first started learning to read and write I could only memorise the alphabet in pictures at first. A for apple, B for bread, and so on. To this day I have that pictorial alphabet in my mind.

When I started learning English in school, I remembered new vocabulary words if I created a mental picture of them, even better, when I doodled an associating image next to the word. I figured that I could almost tell an entire story word for word if there were pictures to underline it.

In college, when I took up French, the teaching methods seemed very "dry" and boring to me. There was nothing creative or challenging about it. I was urged to just learn everything by heart and pass the exam, that's it. As a result of this soulless type of teaching, many students didn't pass their tests. I myself, had to look for other ways and means to keep myself interested and motivated in learning French by reading children's books and short stories for teenagers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

In general, pictures will appeal more to kids as compared to words, but when they grow up, words will appeal just as much pictures. I think in your case, you are more of a visual type of learner. As for me I don't think I depended on pictures when I was trying to learn the alphabet until now.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pictures definitely help when it comes to learning a new language.

I'm recently learning Spanish on Duolingo, which provides you with an image for every new word. It's much less boring this way. Of course, different people prefer different teaching methods, and it doesn't really matter which one you choose as long as you work hard.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think many people are "visual" learners.  I too grew up with an alphabet board and a chalk board and all of my siblings and I were early talkers and writers.  If a picture helps you with the concept as opposed to just looking at the characters of the word, by all means use it.  I believe people can learn from imprinting a visual especially in learning a complex system like a language.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Scribendi: World-Class Editing and Proofreading

In college, when I took up French, the teaching methods seemed very "dry" and boring to me. There was nothing creative or challenging about it. I was urged to just learn everything by heart and pass the exam, that's it. As a result of this soulless type of teaching, many students didn't pass their tests. I myself, had to look for other ways and means to keep myself interested and motivated in learning French by reading children's books and short stories for teenagers.

I agree that motivation to learn a language is affected greatly in part by how you are taught. Different methods work for different people and if a certain class only teaches one way then there are some students who are bound to not enjoy the class. You have a good method there by reading books. Even if it's children's books. They're much easier to follow and the pictures do help. I actually learned English by beginning with Dr.Seuss books!  :grin:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Any visual stimulation is always more friendly that just text text text, but everything considered a letter can be considered an image, just after we learn that letter it's no longer an image...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...