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Misuse/Abuse of words - That is So Wrong!


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I am not sure if it works the same way in English. Because in Dutch, the verb 'annoy' comes with the extra 'themselves', it cannot be substituted for 'irritate', but this is probably not the case in English.

Some people may say that 'irritate' is used for a longer period of time, while 'annoy' is for shorter annoyances. "My neighbour's loud music every day irritates me" vs The screaming child on the bus annoys me".

Eudora13, your use of "irritate" was correct.

Daedalus,  yes, you're right about the distinction.  It's a very slight distinction, as the two words in English are very similar and people tend to use them interchangeably. 

But "irritate" can also refer to a physical sensation.  If someone is allergic to wool and wears a wool sweater by mistake, she might say, "That sweater irritated my skin." 

And even when we use it with a non-physical reference -- as in this case "The sound of his voice irritates me" -- it implies that the person is so troubled by that sound that she almost feels a physical revulsion. 

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I live near Boston, MA and I hear that word A LOT! I think it must have originated here. I remember an episode of Saturday Night Live with Ben Affleck as the host; there was a segment where he was using a wicked Boston accent and he used the word irregardless. Very authentic! I am very surprised that a news anchor used that word though. I've heard lots of people use that word and I know it's wrong. I'm not sure how she thought it was a real word.

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Hmmm, for me I don't hear this misused too much. Sure I hear it exaggerated but there's usually some truth in what they're saying.

For example:

"You were so sick yesterday. You were LITERALLY throwing up all over the apartment."

Of course this person wasn't vomiting everywhere but he/she was throwing up a lot in different places.

I believe you though. For some reason people exaggerate excessively. You never know how intense a situation was, it's annoying.

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Had an argument with an old lady at my writer's group, former writer's group actually.The bone of contention was reiterate and iterate. I looked it up and either seems fine! What do you think about this word? Do I iterate and then, later reiterate or can I reiterate any time I choose? My dictionary leads me to believe these words are interchangeable.

One more complaint---my ex says aks (ax) instead of ask. It is so stupid; the kids have even told him and he is very very well read! What is up with aksing me a question, bozo?

Oh, big no-no in my book. Misusing the word boisterous! Some say voicterous, which is not even an actual word that I know, anyhow.

Somewhat of a grammar nazi or maybe a grandma nazi?

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Had an argument with an old lady at my writer's group, former writer's group actually.The bone of contention was reiterate and iterate. I looked it up and either seems fine! What do you think about this word? Do I iterate and then, later reiterate or can I reiterate any time I choose? My dictionary leads me to believe these words are interchangeable.

One more complaint---my ex says aks (ax) instead of ask. It is so stupid; the kids have even told him and he is very very well read! What is up with aksing me a question, bozo?

Oh, big no-no in my book. Misusing the word boisterous! Some say voicterous, which is not even an actual word that I know, anyhow.

Somewhat of a grammar nazi or maybe a grandma nazi?

The two words are similar, but not quite interchangeable in my view.  The definitions have some subtle differences that are worth keeping in mind. 

"Iterate" means to perform or utter repeatedly. 

"Reiterate" means to say something again, or many times, especially for emphasis or to clarify.

If someone were to say "Let me reiterate again" that would be redundant as the "reiterate" already means to say "again."

As for "boisterous" pronounced as "voicterous," I've never heard that one before.  Maybe that's a regional difference?    But yet, it's definitely incorrect!

Same with the mispronunciation of "asked."  People get into these bad habits of mispronunciation. 

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Interestingly, the TV cartoon show Futurama is set in the year 3000. One of the things they did, hardly noticeable, is make minor adjustments to the language. One of them is 'ask', they changed that into 'aks'.

Which reminds me of something else, I can't stand it when people get 'etcetera' wrong. When abbreviated, many writ 'ect.' when it should be 'etc.' and, probably because of that, a lot of people pronounce it 'ect-cetera'.

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Interestingly, the TV cartoon show Futurama is set in the year 3000. One of the things they did, hardly noticeable, is make minor adjustments to the language. One of them is 'ask', they changed that into 'aks'.

Which reminds me of something else, I can't stand it when people get 'etcetera' wrong. When abbreviated, many writ 'ect.' when it should be 'etc.' and, probably because of that, a lot of people pronounce it 'ect-cetera'.

I have never noticed anyone write etc as ect.

Irregardless is one of those words that when written looks completely wrong but doesn't sound so wrong. Probably that's why it's so commonly used.

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This is so weird! I was thinking the same thing today and I hadn't even seen this thread yet. Anyway, I don't understand how people think this word makes sense. It's a double negative! Oh well, let them make themselves look stupid if they want to :)

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I would reiterate that I am glad to hear the truth about reiterate and iterate or should I have iterated? I think I should have iterated!

I find it strange that you never heard people speak of their voicterous children, etc. Very common over this way! Makes me feel like choking them but I can't very well choke everybody!

MY current husband can't get over  it "being a mute point!" I say "Moot" but he just can't get the hang of it! I only correct him so he won't look idiotic out there in the world; he doesn't mind but cannot remember! :confused:

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Considering that the word (yes like it or not irregardless is actually a word) irregardless was commonly used more than a century, and possibly several centuries before I was born, I tend to accept that some people use it. I get annoyed when people create portmanteau words based on the names of couples "Brangelina" for instance.

It is found in the dictionary often enough despite being considered to be a colloquialism. It sounds odd, and I do not recall using it, ever. However, I won't dismiss it as a legitimate word since people know what it means, it communicates an actual thought, and it was in use before half of the states in America were even states.

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This is the very first time I hear this word in my life!  I'm not a native english speaker, but it sounds really wrong even for me! 

I find it hard to believe that someone on TV used this word, but I had heard that even native english speakers make a couple of mistakes. I guess there are mistakes that are really understandable. This is not the case at all tho, I don't need to be a native english speaker to know that word is just very wrong!

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The word irregardless ... it just makes my skin crawl! The other night I heard it from a very popular anchor on cable news and wanted to throw my remote at my TV. It is not a good word, yet people use it so often thinking they are grammatically correct. Seriously folks?

I love the quote from Urban Dictionary: "Irregardless Used by people who ignorantly mean to say regardless. According to webster, it is a word, but since the prefix "ir" and the suffx "less" both mean "not or with" they cancel each other out, so what you end up with is regard. When you use this to try to say you don't care about something, you end up saying that you do. Of course everyone knows what you mean to say and only a pompous,rude asshole will correct you."

Go ahead, call me the pompous, rude whatever that wants to correct you!

Anyone else have a word people use too much that makes you want to throw something?

Yeah, I'm also pissed hearing that so often.  And even worse, I would see it even in official newspapers!  I think it has become too common that some people, even journalists, think it's actually a correct word.  It's good to review the dictionary from time to time.

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You know what irks me? People who grew up in an English speaking environment with English as the primary language of their country still mess up "you're" and "your". I don't know what to say, but in almost every comment that I see on youtube, facebook, twitter, all sorts of social media websites, there's at least this one person who uses your in stead of you're, or uses you're instead of your. It really enrages me, considering how English is not my first language, and yet I can still differentiate between the two and understand when to use which one.

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You know what irks me? People who grew up in an English speaking environment with English as the primary language of their country still mess up "you're" and "your". I don't know what to say, but in almost every comment that I see on youtube, facebook, twitter, all sorts of social media websites, there's at least this one person who uses your in stead of you're, or uses you're instead of your. It really enrages me, considering how English is not my first language, and yet I can still differentiate between the two and understand when to use which one.

This also boggles my mind. I don't understand it. It drives me crazy. The confusion between "there" and their" is another one.

I wince every time I hear the word "irregardless". I am very surprised that Anderson Cooper used it.

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I mostly have found words with the prefix in- and un- like if they were interchangeable.

In example intolerant and untolerant, infallible and unfallible, and so on.

Of course, I have also seen as common practice removing the apostrophe from many I'm, don't, you're, you've, just to say a few.

Even though, I believe this type of distortions (or whatever they could be called) are non-exclusive of the English language, because I have seen equivalent actions applied to Spanish words.

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For the written language, I giggle when I see people use alot. I know there's "allot" which means to allocate. And there's a lot, means means, well you know! I've used alot before but only when my finger misses the space bar. Anyway, for those who are having problems with it, here's a funny blog about the "alot".

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I've never heard of this used before. But seriously it kind of negates the point they are trying to make! How ignorant of people..

What irritates me to boiling point is the utterly insane use of the word "like"... I, like, went to my friend's house and she was like, you know, why don't you like ever call before you come, like she ever does, i mean like.. What the heck is that?! Like means to simple appreciate or have a positive predisposition to something...or when it's used to compare one with another!  I feel like throwing something at people every time that word drops out of their mouths! UGGHH!!

I agree that when a person uses the word "like" repeatedly in one sentence is very annoying. Sometimes I find it torturous to listen to people like that. I have try hard not to be rude and ignore them while they're speaking. That's just so annoying.

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Where did this word come from anyway?

I've seen a post on Facebook by my previous English trainer and he didn't like the word either. And yeah, I don't want to sound rude but using such word makes someone (who uses it) look stupid. Haha

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I've never heard that word before, but if I did, I would've thought about it myself as I usually do with every new word I hear before searching it on the internet, and I would've came out with the same conclusion, it just doesn't make sense. I must be awkward hearing it from an anchor, I'm curious to know the whole sentence.

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I agree that when a person uses the word "like" repeatedly in one sentence is very annoying. Sometimes I find it torturous to listen to people like that. I have try hard not to be rude and ignore them while they're speaking. That's just so annoying.

I find the overuse of "like" very annoying and torturous too.  :amazed: I really have to bite my tongue. My nephew constantly says, "I was like" and "She was like".  I have no idea what he means. I have talked to him about it to no avail.

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I get really bothered when people say "gorgeous" I have no idea why. I feel like this word is over used, and misused. I much prefer people to say beautiful, pretty, amazing or any other spin off of this word. Many people where I live refer to just about everything as gorgeous and it jut makes me crazy. So I would have to say that is the thing that bothers me the most.

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