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All kinds of English?


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Have you ever heard people speak English but differently? I mean Koreans speak English and most of them cannot utter the correct pronunciation and syllabication but it is still English, so it's like Korean English. For the English people literally from England they have another accent for how they pronounce English which is again different with American English and further more Australian English. So in reality each country or people have their kind of English based on how they pronounce words and use them.

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I don't know that I would say that it is different kinds of English but rather the different accents that people have. Even within the United States, there are different accents from all over. I'm from the south and I know that I have a southern accent. When I travel up north people act like I don't speak the same language as them because my accent and pronounciation is much different from theirs.

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I love certain Indian accents of Indian people (from India), they remind me of Appy from the Simpsons and I find that amusing. I'm sure that not all the Indians speak like that though lol.

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Not quite "different english" but certainly different accents. I live in Scotland and my accent is different from the other countries within the UK. The various regions within Scotland have individual accents,and also dialogue, depending on the district you reside.

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English is spoken as a native language in so many countries -- including the UK, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand among others -- and so it's inevitable that there are some wide variances in the language and its usage. 

We find that vocabulary, pronunciation, spelling and even grammar have evolved differently not just country by country but even within regions.  In the UK think of the sound of the accent of someone in Dublin and the accent of someone in London.  Or in the U.S. a native New Yorker and a Texan.  Quite different.

That's part of what makes English so fascinating to me as a native speaker.  I enjoy hearing the nuances of accents and vocabulary. 

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Have you ever heard people speak English but differently? I mean Koreans speak English and most of them cannot utter the correct pronunciation and syllabication but it is still English, so it's like Korean English. For the English people literally from England they have another accent for how they pronounce English which is again different with American English and further more Australian English. So in reality each country or people have their kind of English based on how they pronounce words and use them.

My mother language-- I don't only mean figuratively, I mean like the language of my mother that I grew up speaking-- is American English.

This caused some trouble when I began to study at an Australian school, and my classmates and teachers would look at me as if I were very strange, just because I said "faucet" instead of "tap" or "trash can" instead of "rubbish bin"!

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There are definitely many versions of the English language. Even within the United States, there are many, many words that are pronounced differently. There are also many phrases or words that though they may mean the exact same thing, are completely different. A couple examples would be pop versus soda and creek versus crick

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People speak differently according to their education and experience, that's pretty normal. I don't think it's another kind of English, it's just who we are, language is a tool and we use it as we know or please.

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I wouldn't say we speak different types of English but I do know that accents vary from country to country and even within the same region. Our English is most likely the same because whenever we write, we usually use the same words, so it is only when we speak that it is different due to diversity.

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English is spoken as a native language in so many countries -- including the UK, the U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand among others -- and so it's inevitable that there are some wide variances in the language and its usage. 

We find that vocabulary, pronunciation, spelling and even grammar have evolved differently not just country by country but even within regions.  In the UK think of the sound of the accent of someone in Dublin and the accent of someone in London.  Or in the U.S. a native New Yorker and a Texan.  Quite different.

That's part of what makes English so fascinating to me as a native speaker.  I enjoy hearing the nuances of accents and vocabulary.

Yes. English really becomes fascinating due to instances like this. It's really unpredictable and surprising how the English language is used, presented, and spoken by people whether of the same region, country and origin. Here in our country, every region and place speak English differently, and most of them have different accents depending on their native tongue. Some can pronounce it well and others don't so it really is fascinating to hear people speak English.

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Yes, I have noticed there's a part of the world where there's a lot of English speaking community, but still, English is not their native language. The vocabulary used are smaller in number compared to countries where English is the local or most commonly used language.

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Yes, I think different countries and their cultures tend to use English differently, whether it be pertaining to the usage of words or just the accent, while still maintaining the core elements enough for them to still be understandable to any English speaking nation or person. I find the Indian way of speaking English to be one of the more fascinating ones because they are influenced more by the British English, as far as I know.

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Have you heard a Singaporean person speaking English?  I'm not saying it's funny or anything, I actually think it sounds sooooo cute!  But it's incredibly hard to understand for me sometimes.  There are times I need to ask them to speak more slowly to me, because I just couldn't get the last word they used.  I think their English is really good and nice :)  Not my favorite accent, but I still think it's a really nice one :)

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