Jump to content
Linguaholic
Improve your knowledge of any language online

What sources do you use to learn a new language?


Recommended Posts

There are many ways to begin learning a new language. This may include books, the internet, or taking classes. As I began to learn the Spanish language, I learned basic phrases and correct grammar through foreign language courses at my public high school. However, at the same time, I desperately wanted to learn how to speak my native tongue. So began to research websites on the internet that were most helpful to me. Of these websites, was the website: 'mylanguageexchange'. This website basically a social networking site that connected you to other users who spoke the language that you were attempting to learn. In a way, they were connecting you to a pen pal that you could email, Skype, or connect with in other forms of communications. What resourcess do you guys tend to use while attempting to learn a new language, and how have they helped you more than others?

Link to post
Share on other sites
Improve your knowledge of any language online

I think the website and app Duolingo is the best way to learn a language for me. I have tried reading books or using old video tapes I have found lying around the house but I think the thing that makes Duolingo better than most methods is how it is personalised and will recognise weaker words until you have learnt them better. It allows you to go at your own pace and only when you are ready can you move on to the next level.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on what language it is, but I think no matter what language it is I would use the internet the most. Books are limited in the library, and buying books is not really a good option if you ask me. I mean, the book might not work at all for you, and then you would have wasted a lot of money on that book...

As far as Japanese goes, I'm currently reading Japanese The Manga Way (physical book, basic grammar) which I found at the library. (It was literally the only decent book the library had about japanese learning. They also had some very old and used book that the university supposedly used/uses for teaching japanese, but obviously that isn't a book good for self-learners, since it's used in the classroom) After I'm done with that, I will start Tae Kim's guide to japanese grammar. (website)

Aside from that, I use flashcards for vocabulary and the kana/kanji (the characters). I use Anki for flashcards, which is a program/app for the PC and the smartphone. I may also use the flashcards for grammar when I start Tae Kim's guide.

Tae Kim's guide is also pretty basic grammar, and I know where to look to find more advanced resources, but I don't really know of any right off the bat. I'm not a big fan of classes, since they limit your studying speed. The only good thing with classes is that you get to study with other people, and it's good if you want to learn how to speak the lagnuage in question properly. If you are fine with being able to passively understand spoken and written (insert language here) then I think self-studying is superior. Atleast if you have assistance to get somewhere, like... This forum, the internet in general, or a friend who knows the language. No matter how good books you have, you'll probably need help at some point, and being able to ask for help on a forum or something, is really awesome.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I wanted to learn a basic of Japanese last year but I had no one to interact with and it wasn't easy to find a website online that can help me teach the basic as I did not understand the writing as well.

I found an application on Android and installed it and it was actually very good and helpful. Every words were spelt using times roman and the speaker was a Japanese. It was all about numbers, basic questions, and pretty much all the things I wanted to know and learn.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Scribendi: World-Class Editing and Proofreading

My number one source is book. Book is a great reference for learning things and language is not an exemption to this. I use books for learning language. It has the necessary information I need, and other supplementary details, say about the culture. Not only that, it also has different exercises that are really helpful to test the things I've learned. Next to books are audios. Because language doesn't not involve just reading and writing, but also speaking, it is necessary that how the word is said, supposed to be said be learned. Audios take this part. They are great for making me familiarized with the words and the enunciation. And because we're living now of the internet age, I take it also as my source, the most convenient one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to use a lot of different sources to get as much experience as possible. I also try to go for things that are entertaining. So I have a regular textbook but I also watch movies in the language (German for me), usually with English subtitles, or put German subtitles on an English movie I was going to watch anyway. I listen to a lot of music in the native language and memorize the lyrics. I've also gotten a lot of mileage out of watching YouTube Let's Plays in German. That's probably only a good option if you already like those but the options are really limitless. For more focused study I prefer reading stories and books that are in both languages and I also memorize poetry in German.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also use Duolingo and its mobile app because the "gamified" aspect of learning language is so enticing for me. The community of language learners that use Duolingo are also very helpful in dissecting each sentence or quiz item and so you begin to build a more real-world based idea of the language. 

:grin:

Link to post
Share on other sites

I also use Duolingo and its mobile app because the "gamified" aspect of learning language is so enticing for me. The community of language learners that use Duolingo are also very helpful in dissecting each sentence or quiz item and so you begin to build a more real-world based idea of the language. 

:grin:

Same here! It makes learning a new language fun. Admittedly it does not go extremely deep into a language but that's why I always either get a text book, or find some sort of document online that can assist me alongside Duolingo.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I started learning Spanish, I did it with the help of a correspondence course and a friend in Latin America who interacted with me on Skype every day.

One of my favourite sources of getting more familiar with this beautiful language were illustrated books for children and young adults. Not to mention the treasure of having an illustrated pocket dictionary for all occasions. :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think the best sources are the ones you feel most comfortable using. When I first started studying Spanish, I only used a book. When I learned Korean, I had a language exchange partner. When I studied French, it was in a classroom. I think the best source is the one that helps you the most.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with what you say fortuna, the best best sources are the ones that make you comfortable of the ones you can afford or have time with. In my case I would go to a language school if I had the time and money because I think it's the easier way to learn, with a teacher.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I tend to use a little bit of anything and everything that is available where ever I can find it. I use online materials a lot. Plenty of websites for learning various languages. Books, exposure to a different written language nearly everyday in various places and so on. I tend to just sort of soak it up as I go along.  :tongue:

Link to post
Share on other sites

For the past 6 months I've been using An app called Duolingo. Its been very helpful in teaching me new words, & phrases, because it teaches you with audio sentences spoken by a fluent speaker. This makes recognizing words spoken in that language easier to identify, when heard on TV or the radio (Or in person).

I've also been using Music & Television to expand my my vocabulary. I believe this can be a very effective way to acquire an ear for the language you're learning if you can't be fully submerged in an environment of fluent speakers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was learning Spanish I found books to be the most helpful.  I used both textbooks and workbooks. I found it very helpful to have my own books as this gave me the freedom to write notes in the margins, to underline or highlight helpful passages and to use Post-It notes and book marks so that I could refer to various sections. 

Same with dictionaries; I always liked having books, and similarly being able to write in them and underline.  I found that it helped me both to focus and to remember what I was studying and learning.

I agree that the Internet offers vast resources these days that we didn't have even five years ago.  I think this is making language learning much easier but at the same time, I still believe that having physical books is also very important too.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I start out with language learning I used Rosetta Stone for the basics and then I purchased a lot magazines and reading materials written in that language and once I've fully grasp how it works, I move to speaking and learning the proper accents. Watching movies and shows has helped with the accent one.

Link to post
Share on other sites

A dictionary is a must. Other than that I use Google Translate a lot to gather new words and study their meanings in a lot. Beyond that Duolingo helps master new phrases and words in a very convenient and easy way. This makes learning more fun, that's what a lot of people who I know have used the app say.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have found just searching the internet for guides and tutorials to be the best way for me to learn a language. I tend to get tired and bored of language programs, so I use the internet keeps things fresh and new.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 weeks later...

I only use the internet, various media like movies and songs, and various reading materials like books and cd's when I'm trying to learn a new language. I can't afford to hire a tutor for now, so I'm content with just self-studying.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I watch video lessons on YouTube,  download pdf articles and create vocabulary lessons myself through searching the net so I can review them when I'm not using the Internet.  I also use Livemocha italkinand Lang-8 to practice and get help from native speakers.nI also use Duolingo, found their app very useful and great to use.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally search up words from websites that I find on Google that I need to or should learn. There are a lot of websites that are helpful in this way. Then I usually talk to friends who know that language to try and become more fluent in it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a list of websites bookmarked on my browser but I also have books that I bought way back when I was still enrolled in a language class. In addition to these resources I've downloaded language apps in my phone so that whenever I find myself not doing anything, I can just open my phone and continue studying.  :grin:

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, when I learn a new language, I sort of rely on the books that I buy. They're usually meant to be easy and teach you the basics of the language, and then you work on it from there. I occasionally use translators if I don't get words, such as Google Translate. Also, reading a dictionary can actually be helpful. You might think that it's silly, but if you think about it, you can really expand your vocabulary by reading a dictionary.

Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many ways to begin learning a new language. This may include books, the internet, or taking classes. As I began to learn the Spanish language, I learned basic phrases and correct grammar through foreign language courses at my public high school. However, at the same time, I desperately wanted to learn how to speak my native tongue. So began to research websites on the internet that were most helpful to me. Of these websites, was the website: 'mylanguageexchange'. This website basically a social networking site that connected you to other users who spoke the language that you were attempting to learn. In a way, they were connecting you to a pen pal that you could email, Skype, or connect with in other forms of communications. What resourcess do you guys tend to use while attempting to learn a new language, and how have they helped you more than others?

For me I usualy use the English-Spanish dictionaries, I also use movies and some websites on the net, and I seem to be improving in learning spanish.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...