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Linguaholic

One on one class or group class


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I imagine that they would both have their downsides and benefits. I've never taken a one-on-one class before, but I have taken group classes. In a one-on-one class, you would be able to go at your own pace, whereas in a group class you have to either linger with the students who don't learn as fast as you or you end up left behind because the class needs to move on. With a group class, you can work together to help each other learn and study, which isn't something you can do with a one-on-one course.

I feel like the best way to do it would be to have a group class but also have a lot of one-on-one time with your instructor.

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Both have their pros and cons. One on one is good because it allows the tutor to focus on you only so any questions can be answered without interruptions. Bad thing is you'll be alone and after the class is over, you'll have no one to discuss with. Group study is more or less the opposite of one on one. Of course, there are more to them I'm only giving one example.

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I'd say that for starters it's a lot better to go for the one on one: better time use, it is easier for the teacher to correct your mistakes, you learn vocabulary at triple speed and you don't have the chance to get distracted... Because let's be honest, at the beginning when you are newbie it is easy to lose focus especially what you are not grasping the general meaning of a conversation.

For a more proficient user it is better to go on a group class because when you are proficient you need to train different skills, you are not concerned anymore on grammar or vocabulary, you start to worry about how to enter an ongoing conversation, how to understand the conversation when somebody is not speaking to your advantage and how to live submerged by that language...

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There are pros and cons to each. The success of either depends largely on the teacher and methods he/she uses.

In a group class, each student can become an "instructor." There are various types of methods/lessons that will expose the student to the target language in ways that a one-on-one lesson cannot. These methods encourage dialogue and are fun and interactive. Games, songs, role-playing, etc., can be very effective in learning and retaining various language points. This, of course, must be closely monitored by the teacher. And for students who are more timid or shy, this may be a more comfortable setting for them.

A one-on-one program is probably, in the end, more beneficial. The teacher can focus on the student's individual needs and identify weak and strong areas. The entire lesson can be tailored to that one student. The student will be forced to use the target language more than in a group lesson. Plus, during the lesson the student is only hearing native pronunciation, grammar, sentence structure, etc. (if the tutor is a native speaker).

I've taught both. I enjoy teaching group lessons more because I like the fun, activity-driven environment. It's harder to maintain this type of environment in a one-on-one lesson for 30, 60, or more minutes. This is especially true if the student has a more laid back personality. A sedate, boring lesson where the teacher is doing most of the talking is absolutely the worst environment in which to learn.

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I personally prefer being in a group because then I don't notice so much that I'm trying to learn whereas if I'm in a one on one class I'd feel like I'm forcing myself to learn too much and thus probably won't learn it as subconsciously as I would if I were having fun learning it with friends.

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This definitely depends on each individuals liking. Everyone has different preferences and experiences and so it would be up to each person to decide what works best for them. However, both can certainly be effective methods of learning.

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For learning languages it is best group class because you get to talk in different situations that occur with your classmates, but when learnig Chemistry for example, there is no much need to interact with a lot of people, the only person needed is the one teaching you. But it is a matter of choice at the end, because if you want the social part of learning then you might consider group classes.

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I prefer to learn a new language one on one with a tutor, because I think I could use the specialized attention to focus more. I noticed that I learn a subject easily like Math if a person teaches me one on one as compared to listening in class as a group.

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  Well, I'm certain that most of what will follow has been mentioned already, so I shall be brief.

  Speaking as a teacher, my current preference is for one on one interaction. I find the students to be more focused, relaxed, and openly curious.

  Groups can be standoffish, both with the teacher, as well as other group members.

  In the final analysis, it really boils down to where you feel the most comfortable.

  Was that brief, or what?

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  Well, I'm certain that most of what will follow has been mentioned already, so I shall be brief.

  Speaking as a teacher, my current preference is for one on one interaction. I find the students to be more focused, relaxed, and openly curious.

  Groups can be standoffish, both with the teacher, as well as other group members.

  In the final analysis, it really boils down to where you feel the most comfortable.

  Was that brief, or what?

Yes, I agree. (I am an ESL teacher.) The maximum benefit results from one-on-one teaching. In order to make group teaching effective, the teacher needs to consciously create the proper atmosphere - relaxed, fun, interactive. The students must want to get involved and feel comfortable doing so. When everything is "clicking" in a group class, it is lots of fun and a great environment for learning. Of course, most of this depends on the teacher.

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The obvious answer for me is one on one. I will not ask anything and would be embarrassed to try in front of a group. When there is a one on one class I will become more comfortable and the techniques will be guided more towards me.

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Class group I think would be best. Since language is our main form of communicating to one another, being able to practice it is crucial to learning the language, so if you're surrounded by people who is trying to learn the language, you are now pressured into speaking the language henceforth sharpening your speaking (and possibly writing) skills. If you get to interact with a whole group it will make the learning experience more fun and genuine.

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I think both have their cons and pros, but a one on one class would definitely be the best option f you have the money to pay for it.  I know because when I was younger I was having trouble with a specific school subject, so my mom paid a private tutor for me for one on one study sessions!

I learnt a lot thanks to that, it wouldn't have been the same in a group class, because the teacher is so close to you and is explaining ONLY to you, if you have any doubt you can just ask him to explain something again and show you examples.

The only downside of one on one study sessions I can think of right now is the price, nothing else.

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Well both options have their pros and cons but I'd prefer being in a class. Since language is communication, being able to use the language your learning to interact with others can be really beneficial for you. On the other hand having a one on one session can also be good since you can really focus on learning the language but I'm more for the class.

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  • 3 weeks later...

I think it would depend on the person. Some will do better at one on one because they'll have much more attention from the instructor, and some people just don't like feeling silly by having to answer a question while a lot of people are listening. Others would probably enjoy learning with more people, because they can also learn from their classmates, and may enjoy that type of atmosphere.

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I think that one-on-one classes are more effective than group ones when it comes to teaching language. The teacher can focus more on the progress of the student, and the student will not have many distractions during class. Before, I studied Korean in a group setting. I learned a lot, but I found it difficult because of the noise that my classmates were creating.

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I think a small group class would be the most effective.  You get the benefit of lots of interaction with the teacher but you also get to listen a lot to others so you can practice speech comprehension.  I found that I was very good at learning to read in a new language, but understanding what I was hearing was very difficult so I would want more of that.

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I've seen it also depends on the students and the teacher. Some students work much better one on one, and some require the input of a larger group. I've seen some teachers are more suited to one teaching style too.

I personally like to have a bit of both. When it's one on one, I like I can ask more questions. When it's in a group, I like that others' questions and mistakes help me to notice about my own issues with the learning process.

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I prefer to be in a group class than learn on my own. All the attention is on me if I have to learn in an individual class. I cannot handle that attention. I also enjoy competing with other students as it motivates me to be the best I can be. Besides having someone to talk to about the subject is an added advantage.

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At first, I thought a group setting would be most beneficial, but the differing levels does throw a wrench in things. I think it would depend on if a native speaker were present. That would be most beneficial because I wouldn't want to adopt something as correct when it is not - but was used often enough in the group to be accepted as correct. In the end, I'd prefer one on one.

Has anybody ever hired a native speaker for practice? I met a woman once who did that as a job; she hired herself out for an hour of German conversation with somebody who was learning the language. The idea is tempting, but I imagine it would be awkward. I'd love to hear about some other experiences.

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