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What do you think about the Taglish problem? Or do you think it isn't a problem at all? I can't help but feel sad that people nowadays couldn't seem to finish one complete sentence in Filipino. There would almost always be an English word or two in there. And then there's the thing about parents raising English-speaking kids, as if being fluent in English and ignorant in Filipino make their kids smarter.

Any thoughts?

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  • 1 month later...

I don't mind commonly used English words being included in the conversation like mall, floor, ref, elevator, escalator, etc., but when I heard my brother say, "Gusto mo ng water?" it sounded annoying. I think the Taglish problem is ok to use in many cases like "Anong floor ka ba bababa?" That sentence is perfectly acceptable, since "palapag" is too deep, but the sentence my bro said is not pleasant to hear, it's like pa-sosyal, you know?

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Hmmm....I'm not really sure how I feel about Taglish. 

I'm Filipino but my Filipino is horrendous.  Coming from a non-Tagalog speaking region, I don't speak Filipino very well and don't have many opportunities to use it.  I'm more conversant in English than Filipino.  So, in the rare occasions that I have to speak Filipino, I have to admit that certain English words would creep in.  I don't really like mixing languages but I can resort to Taglish when I'm desperate.

However, when I hear someone speaking Taglish, I have to admit there is a part of me that feels that that person is being pretentious.

I guess that makes me a hypocrite.  :tongue:

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  • 2 weeks later...

I don't mind this at all. For instance, even if I am a Filipino, I am not that good in Filipino. I think this is because ever since I started going to school, English has been the primary focus of schools.

I don't mean to offend you in any way, but don't you think this is exactly the problem? I think that "not minding" is a serious issue, because it's paramount to saying that there's nothing wrong in Taglish being the norm. This is just my opinion, so again I don't intend to attack you personally. I just feel like we are gradually losing our identity because our native language isn't being used as much as we should.

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  • 1 month later...

I've gotten use to speaking in a mixture of Tagalog & English or Taglish too and so are my kids.  Just like what Sidney mentioned, there's so many Tagalog words that are so "deep" to be use in daily conversations like "floor" instead of "Palapag".  But I think using "water" instead of "tubig" is just...

  :bored:

But now I think schools are going with this full Tagalog instruction thing with some subjects.  Like recently I helped my daughter with her Economics subject (taught in Tagalog Ekonomiks) and it really gave me a headache. 

:sweating:

The tagalog words/phrases are so deep that I have to look it up online to understand what the book is saying.  Example:

"Tanto ng Paghahalili" means "Rate of Substitution" while "Kurba ng Pantay Layon" means "Indifference Curve".

I wonder what words/phrases they will come up with when they decided to teach Math in full Tagalog too.  :confused:

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Most Filipinos are trying to learn English and has lost focus on their original language I guess. It is similar here, people don't think you are smart if you talk strictly creole, so everyone is teaching their children English and when they try to talk our native Patois they mix it with English. It is not always pleasant but as Sidney said, some things may be acceptable.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm not a native speaker, I just have a friend teaching me a few words in Tagalog. However, when I learn a language then I don't like to mix up the sentence with a different language when I speak. I don't know why it gets to me but I just don't like to do that. The water sentence would probably be annoying to me too if he constantly said that yet knew the word in it's original language.

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I've gotten use to speaking in a mixture of Tagalog & English or Taglish too and so are my kids.  Just like what Sidney mentioned, there's so many Tagalog words that are so "deep" to be use in daily conversations like "floor" instead of "Palapag".  But I think using "water" instead of "tubig" is just...

  :bored:

But now I think schools are going with this full Tagalog instruction thing with some subjects.  Like recently I helped my daughter with her Economics subject (taught in Tagalog Ekonomiks) and it really gave me a headache. 

:sweating:

The tagalog words/phrases are so deep that I have to look it up online to understand what the book is saying.  Example:

"Tanto ng Paghahalili" means "Rate of Substitution" while "Kurba ng Pantay Layon" means "Indifference Curve".

I wonder what words/phrases they will come up with when they decided to teach Math in full Tagalog too.  :confused:

I'm an Economics major and this sounds really odd to me. But I like the idea that schools are doing this. I also use an English word here and there when speaking in Filipino. But I try my best to avoid foreign terms. Some friends even laugh at me because I speak "weird." When I explain to them, they find me even weirder. I don't care, though. I will never find it normal saying things such as "nagfo-fall in line."  :confused:

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  • 2 weeks later...

No, I don't mind Taglish at all because there are English words that we cannot directly translate to Filipino. This is allowed in Philippine Universities. Some college students I know wrote their theses using the Filipino language with a mixture of English words. But I remember some of the English words are spelled in Filipino. I cannot exactly remember the words, but it was allowed. It is acceptable.

Maybe what's annoying is how some people use Taglish. The way it is constructed and said have a lot to do with it.

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