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Linguaholic

Nandito vs. Narito


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  • 4 weeks later...

Both have the same meaning in my opinion. But "nandito" is mostly used for a person (especially on the first degree).

Example:

"Nadito na ako sa Maynila"

"Narito" is for objects. It can also be used for a person but it sounds horrible.

Example:

"Narito ang bahay ni Jose Rizal"

Take note that this is just based on my opinion.

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I may be wrong, but I imagine it follows the same rules as Dito vs Rito. Dito is used when the preceding word ends with a consonant, while rito is used when the preceding word ends with a vowel.

I can't agree about Narito sounding horrible when used to refer to persons. The song that comes with the line "Narito ako" comes to mind.

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I'm also not an expert but I've seen both terms used as >> "Nandito ako" and "Narito ako", in books and song lyrics ("narito" in earlier songs), so I don't think its usage depends if it pertains to a person or an object.

Again, I'm not an expert but I think the word "narito" was commonly use in earlier times while "nandito" is like a newer version of the word and commonly use today.  Like a deeper (or "mas malalim") Tagalog word.  :grin:

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'm also not an expert but I've seen both terms used as >> "Nandito ako" and "Narito ako", in books and song lyrics ("narito" in earlier songs), so I don't think its usage depends if it pertains to a person or an object.

Again, I'm not an expert but I think the word "narito" was commonly use in earlier times while "nandito" is like a newer version of the word and commonly use today.  Like a deeper (or "mas malalim") Tagalog word.  :grin:

I agree. Narito and even rito, are almost never used these days. You would always hear people say dito and nandito. At least that's what I experience here in my place. Oh and yeah, I almost forgot about the song Nandito Ako. I'm afraid there'll come a time when rito will become obsolete.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Isn't it more of a dialect difference rather than an inherently grammatical one?

I mean, "na(n)-" is a prefix used to denote where someone/thing is located. It's used when questioning where someone is ("Nasaan sila?") and in the response expressing where they are ("Nasa mall sila.")

Similarly, there is a rule regarding D and R usage that depends on what kind of letter precedes the word.

- A word ending in vowels and vowel-sound (such as y and w) use the R form "raw/rin"

- A word ending in consonants use the D form "daw/din"

So it's a matter of whether the speaker is using the prefix "nan-" in which case the word is "nandito", or whether they're using the prefix "na-" in which case the word is "narito".

They both mean the same though and is totally independent from whether the topic is a person or an inanimate subject (such as in the song, "Narito ako na lagi ng nakatingin...").

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  • 3 weeks later...

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