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Constructed Languages and Natural Languages. (Ancient Post)


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Various languages have been artificially created, such as Esperanto or Klingon.  Some of these (Esperanto, Bolak, etc.) have been academic attempts to create an universal language.  Others (Klingon, Vulcan, Lapine, Nadsat) have been constructed to use in fiction. Have any of you ever studied any of these? Elvish (to go with Tolkien) seems to be particularly popular.  I suppose Elvish poetry could be fun, I'll have to see if my feeble old mind can handle it. Seems to me that a serious linguist would have fun with some of these.

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I have looked at Elvish a few times.  I think it is a beautiful language but I don't have time to really study it.  I tried briefly, but it was too hard and I don't have anyone to practice speaking with, so I gave up.  It's just a for fun language anyway.

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I hope to try learning enough Elvish to write poetry in it. I also once hoped to be an astronaut.  I remember years ago that there was a theory that there is an instinctive language that is natural to humans, but is now repressed or lost.  Does anyone out there remember this and have any further information on this?

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After looking at elvish I realize that there is inadequate vocabulary to write any poetry that would be up to my standards. I haven't looked at Vulcan or Klingon, but might consider lapine and use whatever vocabulary is there since lapine poetry would need a limited vocabulary to fit the mind of a rabbit.

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I tried learning Lojban for some time but to be honest saw no point in that after a while - I can always appreciate that a language looks pretty but in the end the practical aspect is the most important.

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To tell you the truth, apart from Esperanto, I haven't really heard much about the other languages that you mention. I am a practically inclined person, so I don't really feel attracted to things that don't serve me in my daily life, and that includes languages. I am sure these artificially constructed languages have their place in the scheme of things, but to me they are useless.

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While replying to a question about language on a forum that has nothing to do with the topic I thought about "speaking in tongues" and it made me think back to this thread.  Also known as glossolalia, this form of speech is thought by some to relate back to natural language.  There has even been academic research into the phenomenon.  Have any of you had experience with this?  Have any of you seen this from different language backgrounds, such as in an English speaking church and then a Spanish speaking church. Do Spanish speaking Pentecostals sound different from English speaking Pentecostals?  I believe the phenomenon exists in different religions, does the glossolalia differ?

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When I started reading the Lord of the Rings series and The Hobbit, I got interested with the Elvish language so I did some research and had tried learning it. Unfortunately though I didn't pursue it as I got distracted with other things however I still want to learn it and will probably do it once I can squeeze some time to focus on it.

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I've never attempted to learn it but I have heard of these languages and I do find them interestingly. Growing up the most prominent fictional language I've heard of was only Klingon and now I'm finding that more and more fictional stories are coming up with their own language and I think that's pretty neat. I don't think I'll be learning them anytime soon but only mostly because I have no one around to use it on but if I had that culture around me I'd probably be more motivated.

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  • Linguistanerd changed the title to Constructed Languages and Natural Languages. (Ancient Post)

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