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advise vs advice, price vs prize

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Some people are confuse with these words. When do we really use the word advice vs advise, price vs prize?

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They are the same.  The difference in spelling is simply due to regional variations: British English v American Spelling.  There are other words, such as excercize, exercise that are similarly variable.

Generally, words ending with /ize/ are British and words ending in /ise/ are American.

Canadian spelling usually uses the same as British, with a few variations. 

I hope this helps!

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Generally, words ending with /ize/ are British and words ending in /ise/ are American.

Hey SarahRTW, I think it should be the other way around:

Words ending with /ize/ is American English and words ending in /ise/ is British English.

regards

M

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They are the same.  The difference in spelling is simply due to regional variations: British English v American Spelling.  There are other words, such as excercize, exercise that are similarly variable.

But... Price and prize aren't the same word at all, are they?  :confused: Price is like, how much something costs, while prize is an award.

Also, I thought advice was a noun ("Let me give you some advice!") and advise was a verb ("I like to advise.")

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Advise vs Advice

Czarownica is correct. "Advise" is the verb, whereas "advice" is a noun. For example, you could say "I'd advise you to give him some advice". A similar one which sometimes cause problems is "practise" vs. "practice". "Practise" is the verb e.g. "I'm going to practise the piano", but "practice is a noun e.g. "I'm going to choir practice".

"Price" and "prize" are both nouns but mean totally different things: "price" is how much something costs, and "prize" is an award you would get for winning a competition.

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Czarownica is correct. "Advise" is the verb, whereas "advice" is a noun. For example, you could say "I'd advise you to give him some advice". A similar one which sometimes cause problems is "practise" vs. "practice". "Practise" is the verb e.g. "I'm going to practise the piano", but "practice is a noun e.g. "I'm going to choir practice".

"Price" and "prize" are both nouns but mean totally different things: "price" is how much something costs, and "prize" is an award you would get for winning a competition.

Absolutely correct. You could not have explained it better.

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"Advise" is a verb, an action word while "advice" is a noun. "Price" is used in products,items or commodities which means the monetary value of something while "prize" means a reward which either cash or something else. :)

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I'm not sure on what the official usage is, but I usually use advice as a noun, and advise as a verb, but even then to me it has a different connotation to the verb version of advice. To me it's more of a suggestion than advice when you say advise. As for price and prize, I use price for the cost of things, and prize as a bonus or winnings such as prizes won at carnivals and arcades.

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Advise vs Advice

Price belongs to how much an item costs. Prize is an award that your receive. They are very different in meaning and cannot be used as meaning the same.

 

Advice is the noun. These nouns denote an opinion as to a decision or course of action:

 

Advise is the verb. These verbs mean to suggest a particular decision or course of action:

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Sometimes an image can help. Check this image out: Advise vs Advice and hopefully you will be able to remember this forever.

56ee8fe59a8d9_AdvicevsAdvise.jpg.ea4cb71

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On 29/08/2013 at 1:48 AM, linguaholic said:

 

Hey SarahRTW, I think it should be the other way around:

 

Words ending with /ize/ is American English and words ending in /ise/ is British English.

 

regards

 

M

I know it's 2.5 years old, but I'd still like to correct it:
"ize" and "yze" = American English.
"ise" and "yse" = Australian English.
British English is OK with both, depending on the context.

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regarding the word "Advice" its more to do with the parts of speech and which English you speak.

 

But when it comes to "Prize" and "Price", the meaning is entirely different, at least in the way in which we were taught English in school.

 

Prize = You have won the first prize in the competition.

Price = What is the price of this game?

 

So the meaning is entirely different here. Hope that helps.

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I'm not sure if British English is different from American when it comes to these terms, but I can speak for American English. Advise is a verb; it is something you can do. Like "I advise you to check the weather". Advice is a noun. Like "I can give you advice on the weather". Price and Prize are both nouns, but they have two completely different meaning and are not related. Price is a word to describe how much something is. "The price of that drink is $1.08". Prize is an award or reward. "Your prize for winning the race is a trophy".

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As has been pointed out, price and prize are two different words with distinct meanings. To complicate things further, there's also prise (pronounced identically to "prize") which means to force open, as in "I had to prise open that jam jar with a knife."

Advice is a noun (to give advice) while advise is a verb (to advise somebody). That's the case in both American and British English. They're also pronounced differently ("advise" rhymes with "prize").

Two other problematic pairs of words that are worth mentioning are "licence"/"license" and "practice"/"practise".

In British English, licence is a noun ("I've finally got my driving licence") while license is a verb ("the restaurant is fully licensed").
In American English, license is used for both the noun and the verb.
"Licence" and "license" are pronounced the same.

In British English, practice is a noun ("I'm out of practice") while practise is a verb ("I need to practise my listening").
In American English, practice is used for both the noun and the verb.
"Practice" and "practise" are pronounced the same.

So a British doctor has licence to practise whereas an American doctor has license to practice.

None of this has anything to do with the "-ise"/"ize" spelling difference which is really another topic. Blaveloper is 100% right on that point though.

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I ink advice and advise is a little more forgiving when used interchangeably while price and prize are completely different. Advice is used when offering your opinions and thoughts whereas I think advise is a much stronger form of suggestion and also it is different in the sense that it is used as a verb rather than a noun which from what I know advice almost always is. Price is very different from prize and I think the confusion is just due to the spelling and how American and British spellings differ so sometimes this might be misconstrued as just one of those small differences but it's very different. 

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Baburra,

The difference between "advice" and "advise" is clear, and best summed up by the picture in linguaholic's post. The two words are not interchangeable. If a student wrote "I received some helpful advise" it would get the red-pen treatment from me. Otherwise I wouldn't be doing my job properly.

Language does evolve. Give it 50 years and perhaps the two words will be interchangeable. I certainly won't be teaching English then!

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