Jump to content
Linguaholic

How Do You Study?


Recommended Posts

There are a ton of different methods of studying when it comes to learning a language. There's immersion, the L-R (Listening-Reading) method and the FLR method just to name a few. Some methods focus more on a particular area of language learning such as speaking over writing, reading and listening.

I was just curious, how do you study? Do you follow a specific method or focus on one area of language learning over the others?

I personally prefer to follow a textbook (with a CD) when I first start off. I really enjoy highlighting, using post-it notes and writing in a textbook. There's also something satisfying about finishing a textbook. For each chapter, I hand-write the vocabulary words and grammar points before adding the vocab to anki. Then I might do a few exercises either on paper, in the book or in my head. Once I get out of the beginner phrase, I try to switch to as much native materials as possible with a focus on reading, writing and listening over speaking.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't really have that much time to study another language nowadays, but whenever I do have time to spare, then just use the internet to translate certain words to another language, since I'm pretty much a beginner. I just casually study for fun, so I don't have any textbooks aside from a translation dictionary.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Right now it's mostly listening and reading, I have no choice, because that's how the course I was structured.  So I mostly have to try memorizing some vocabulary for each lesson, then test my listening skills. Read while I listen, then repeat.  After that I complete some exercises to check if my listening and understanding skills. Pretty simple, not so effective, they don't really cover grammar, but it's government course, so I wasn't expecting much.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to start with the basics first so I have a much better foundation for the language I'm about to learn. I've tried doing shortcuts and just memorize phrases, which does work to some extent as it gives me the ability to have simple dialogue with native speakers but I found that it's way more difficult to advance that way since there is no foundation to sport learning the more complex sentences.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Scribendi: World-Class Editing and Proofreading

With the main language I'm trying to learn it is immersion. But when we first began, we had 3 months of learning Mon-Friday every morning for 4 hours and then we would go out in the afternoon and practice what we learned. (I was doing volunteer work that allowed me to practice so this is a unique situation not everyone has). But now that I am working on a secondary language within the country, I'm not yet satisfied with my study schedule. It is very sporadic and therefore I easily forget what I have learned. Your post has me realizing I need to sit down and really make a schedule where I am doing a specific amount of language learning each week.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

I don't place a lot of emphasis on studying now but when I did I prefered to do it the old fashioned way with a text book and my dictionary. I'd practice by studying vocabularies and using new words to make sentences. By best results also came from having someone to study with.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For the past 13 months I've been reading Der Spiegel (German newspaper) for 4+ hours daily. Also have been listening to German version of Euronews and German-language radio (about 20 minutes per day). Am I satisfied with my German proficiency? Certainly, not. But I doubt I would have learned as much as I actually did through any other manner,--except for immersion, of course.

Link to post
Share on other sites

With language learning, immersion and using the language is SO important. I know too many people who have spent years learning English and probably have great knowledge of grammar, but they're just too shy to speak it!

If you want to learn vocabulary, I highly recommend anki. It's a great flashcard app that helped me learn like 300-400 new words in a month for my SAT exam.

For listening, news channels are a great source of vocabulary with not much slang and a correct accent.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not studying any language at the moment, sadly. But when I am, I personally prefer to start off learning through a Basic Grammar text book with the guidance of a teacher, to build my foundation. Then If I have the option, my ideal learning environment would be through immersion, especially where the natives speak little to no English. This would be the ideal scenario for me :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I always have to read and then listen in order to learn. If I don't see the spelling of the word then it just does not click in my brain. I am a visual learner so seeing the word first helps me retain it. I then listen and try immersion in order for it to really stick.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey I usually go through the following programs to study a language:

Beginner:

-Pimsleur and Michel Thomas during my commute to work. This is good because it is during "dead" time. Pimsleur is especially very good at getting a base, functional level of conversation down. Michel Thomas is okay but better than nothing to help during this "dead" time.

-I use Rosetta Stone a little for vocab but its not the greatest - money or time wise.

Intermediate/Advanced:

-Anki flash cards - EXTREMELY helpful to learning vocabulary. It is a spaced repetition program that will program the cards to reappear at a specified interval for you to be able to retain. There are several shared decks available in each language or you can create your own.

-Read newspapers: any new vocab I put into an Anki deck

-Read books: start off with children's stories and work up. If you have a kindle you can get a english translation dictionary and every word you highlight is translated and saved. Later on I go and put these words in an Anki deck.

-For listening practice I watch TV, movies and TedTalks.

-Grammar books of course.

-Skype one on one tutoring - definitely the method I've progressed the most with. I use http://www.italki.com/?ref=1555469 which basically connects students and native speaking teachers. You can take advantage of exchange rates so the avg lesson is about $10/hour which pretty much beats any other paid course you can get. You can also connect with other students and exchange languages on Skype for free.

Best of luck on your language learning!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 6 months later...

When I am using everyday objects I try to say, for example French, it aloud in another language. I find that it reminds me to always continue learning and to refresh some of the vocabulary I already know. As well, I use apps such as Duolingo because it provides a fun way to learn and keeps me motivated. I also like to watch movies in the language I am learning so I can get used to hearing others speak it. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello everyone! My name is Jorge Solis. I usually study from the book and make notes while I am reading on a separate notebook. Then, I go to Youtube and watch videos to supplement my learning with visual aids. I have found this method to be quite effective. Then, I practice what I learn with other students. Teaching what you learn to others is also a great way of reviewing what you already know. You can't teach something if you do not know it!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well I'm a huge cheapskate so enrolling in a class is a big NO for me. I prefer free methods or other alternatives in learning a new language. Luckily, there are literally thousand of materials available online and in libraries that cost nothing, and I learn by reading those. I also watch Youtube tutorials because hearing the pronunciation and grammar of helps a lot when learning a new language. Finally, there's Duolingo which I think most people on this forum use on a daily basis. It's a great app that offers a bunch of language courses and it definitely works! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I really like to keep a clean and well lighted space around me. Also If my head is on the game (hah high school musical reference) then i can study everywhere. First I do the writing part, vocabulary or something like that because after I while I get bored with work so it's better to do it first, then some listening, conversation, or pimsleur lessons. In the end I like to watch funny youtube videos.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The traditional way: Reading, writing and listening. I prefer a quiet environment when I study, but in my environment I know it's impossible so most of the time I just deal with it and try to study anyway. For the place, I usually just lay on my bed. I believe you've got to t be relaxed to study effectively, and that's what I did.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to get the most out of my days. I do the standard learning process of learning new words and corret grammar, but I also say the name of everyday objects aloud as a use them. I find that this always keeps my vocabulary fresh. As well, I use language apps like Duolingo. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Generally when I study (currently Latin) I write down the word and the translation fifteen times. It takes a while but it sinks in. It is a good strategy.

Writing down things a lot really helps me as well. Especially when learning vocabulary. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Writing down things a lot really helps me as well. Especially when learning vocabulary. 

I've done that ever since I started studying Latin. It has been the only way I have managed to learn as much as I do about Latin.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I like to study in silence and with flash cards. Repetition works best for me. I like to write out what I have to remember and write it down at least five times. It seems to be the only way that I can commit it to memory. I love learning that way. My mind just absorbs it all. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey I usually go through the following programs to study a language:

 

Beginner:

-Pimsleur and Michel Thomas during my commute to work. This is good because it is during "dead" time. Pimsleur is especially very good at getting a base, functional level of conversation down. Michel Thomas is okay but better than nothing to help during this "dead" time.

-I use Rosetta Stone a little for vocab but its not the greatest - money or time wise.

 

Intermediate/Advanced:

-Anki flash cards - EXTREMELY helpful to learning vocabulary. It is a spaced repetition program that will program the cards to reappear at a specified interval for you to be able to retain. There are several shared decks available in each language or you can create your own.

-Read newspapers: any new vocab I put into an Anki deck

-Read books: start off with children's stories and work up. If you have a kindle you can get a english translation dictionary and every word you highlight is translated and saved. Later on I go and put these words in an Anki deck.

-For listening practice I watch TV, movies and TedTalks.

-Grammar books of course.

-Skype one on one tutoring - definitely the method I've progressed the most with. I use http://www.italki.com/?ref=1555469 which basically connects students and native speaking teachers. You can take advantage of exchange rates so the avg lesson is about $10/hour which pretty much beats any other paid course you can get. You can also connect with other students and exchange languages on Skype for free.

 

Best of luck on your language learning!

I basically have to copy this one for the most part!

This is for the most part what I do.

I'm not fan of Michal Thomas as I find it rather boring, though I can see how other people might find it useful. But Pimsleur I love, it's really great to keep up your basics of conversation when you don't get to practice with natives.

Grammar books for structured and organized grammar learning.

Rosetta Stone, this I have never used as it doesn't seem to be my cup of tea.

But Anki, OMG, I could never get Kanji/Hanzi down without it! The best thing for vocab.

TV and other "natural" sources for practice are of course awesome.

Never tried the Skype thing though. There was always some native speaker somewhere with whom I could practice with!

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

I think the easiest way to study for a foreign language is both to speak/listen and write it.  I think in order to learn sentences flow and how to use a word in the past, present and future tense it is important to speak and listen to the language.  On the other hand it is also important to learn how to spell and write sentences in different tenses, and therefore writing is extremely important, especially if you are getting graded on a written test. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×
×
  • Create New...