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g2narat

Rarely Used Tagalog Idioms

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What I like about Tagalog is that it has quite a variety of idiomatic expressions. I find some of them funny and others perfect for their intended use. I'm miss some Filipino idiomatic expressions that used to be so common though. Idioms such as "namamangka sa dalawang ilog", "kabiyak ng dibdib", and "pag pumuti na ang uwak". They used to be so common, but I rarely hear them nowadays.

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The Tagalog idioms that you have mentioned are the rare ones that are not used anymore. The idioms that came to mind are the more common ones like "Aanhin pa ang damo kung patay na ang kabayo", at "balat-sibuyas". They also don't sound too formal or awkward to use in casual conversations as compared to the idioms that you mentioned.  :smile:

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What is an idiom in Tagalog? Gosh I think I had forgotten the right term.

Some of the idioms that I still hear are :

Isang kahig isang tuka

mahirap pa ako sa daga

mababa ang lipad

kapit sa patalim

I heard one new phrase from a friend lately and it is Pecha de peligro I find it funny and interesting not sure if this is just an informal thing or used colloquially

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Pecha de Peligro pertains to Friday the 13th right? Heard my uncles use the term.

I thought that was the right meaning  but I was wrong. Petsa de peligro means the day before payday and you do not have enough money. I heard it from two of my friends and both of them gave me the same meaning. Funny is it not? Maybe it was just something they coined on their own.

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I tried to search the translation of idiom, and Google gave me "salitain."

Anyway, one idiomatic expression that I had not heard  in recent times is "nagbubuhat ng sariling bangko." This pertains to someone who highly thinks of himself. Can be narcissistic, if you may.

Another rare gem is "makapal ang bulsa," which literally translates to "thick pocket." It means someone who has lots of moolah.

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