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That being said or that been said?


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"that being said" or "having said that" transitions to the following topic or effect from the prior information that you discussed.

For example, "Our company has lost $1 million this quarter, that being said, we will not be making any further investments"

Been is the past participle of to be and being in the present progressive form of the verb. In that sense "that being said" is a confusing phrase because it refers to a past action but that is just how the saying works.

Hope that helps.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Spanglish has covered it well, and I hope that helps you some. I'm not surprised you are struggling to distinguish between been and being, because I have observed it's a problem even for some native English speakers!

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That being said is the correct one, I think and that would be the same as saying "that said". When you say that being said, you are saying that there is something that has been stated and you are ready to move on, so you phrase it by saying something to the effect of "now that I have finished saying my previous statement...".

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@Baburra, I think what the OP struggles with is the distinction between the two i.e been and being. Some people just seem to struggle with this, for some reason. It's similar to people using borrow and lend interchangeably. I see it a lot in my country and always wonder why there's that confusion because the two have two different meanings

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I writing a paper and I'm very confused with being vs been. What is the rule? Can someone help?

Both are different forms of the verb to be, but being  can be used both as a gerund and present participle. Been is just the past participle of to be.  So it's use is a bit more restricted, when in doubt use being, specially with phrases where you are trying to hint an activity is taking place, but when an activity has already taken place and has come to and end you use ''been'.

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I think you are rarely going to have to use the expression, 'that being said,' unless you are going to do a good deal of public speaking. That being said, it is a great way to make a point you want to make while acknowledging counter arguments that are going to be lingering in peoples minds. It is sort of like you get that counter argument out of the way and then can move on to your topic. "I've been there done that!"  :laugh:

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I think you are rarely going to have to use the expression, 'that being said,' unless you are going to do a good deal of public speaking. That being said, it is a great way to make a point you want to make while acknowledging counter arguments that are going to be lingering in peoples minds. It is sort of like you get that counter argument out of the way and then can move on to your topic. "I've been there done that!"  :laugh:

Hehe, Saholy, you make a good point actually! "That being said" is not really an expression you'd use in every day language unless you were in a formal setting and/or wanted to appear a bit more eloquent, so if I were the OP I'd avoid it altogether if I were having problems with it. That quickly solves the problem :)

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  • 5 years later...

I have noticed that among my younger colleagues the term "that been said" appears in their emails during explanations. The reason for this misuse is that they have misheard the expression and the usage is reinforced by their peers copying one another. That is, "being" sounds like "been" if it is not clearly enunciated.

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58 minutes ago, Don said:

I have noticed that among my younger colleagues the term "that been said" appears in their emails during explanations. The reason for this misuse is that they have misheard the expression and the usage is reinforced by their peers copying one another. That is, "being" sounds like "been" if it is not clearly enunciated.

It's a common trend worldwide for younger generation people to edit the language until it becomes the default.
And I have the feeling like if this has been the case throughout the history of human people.

Like in Japan in order to say "to eat", you had to say 食べる (taberu), but younger people made it into 食う (kuu) instead for casual speech only.
And nowadays this is a widely accepted way of saying the exact same word, and both words happily co-exist (because it's rare for Japan to remove something once it's already there).

Likewise, the phonetic sound "tu" (テゥ) is pretty new (so new, there's no single sillable for that sound specifically) and younger people have no problem to pronounce it at all, while elderly can't say nor hear it, so they'll hear and say it as "tsu" (ツ) instead.

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