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VioletSky

How Important is Writing When Learning a New Language?

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Hi All,

I wanted to ask how important is writing for you in your language learning process. For me, I like to write down new vocabularies and sample sentences when I learn a new language so that I can better remember. But I was curious about how often do you write and is writing helpful at all for you when learning?

Violet

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When learning a new language writing is very important for me. I too like to write vocabularies and I also practice writing a whole paragraph at times. When I write I happen to recall things much easier than reading or listening so it is something that I do all the time.

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I don't make it my priority since I usually look forward more to being able to use it for conversation and writing it down doesn't help that much with me at all so I just try and memorize the right pronunciations. However, when I was learning Chinese I found it to be very helpful to learn writing at the start since learning the alphabet afforded me to learn the rest of the characters, pronunciations ,and their meanings on my own afterwards.

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I also believe that writing the language you're learning is important, especially at the beginning when you're building your foundation, learning the rules, the syntax,the grammar etc But after getting that out of the way, I would put more emphasis on the spoken aspect and gaining confidence in your language of choice, because I reckon it then becomes a lot easier to write. I have found that in the past, seeing how words are written can put me off, as the pronunciation can be very far removed from the spelling!

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I like to write new vocabularies that I came across everyday to keep tab of all of them. This way, I ensure that I am improving on a daily basis. Sure, it takes a lot of time, but it's totally worth it.

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I don't make it my priority since I usually look forward more to being able to use it for conversation and writing it down doesn't help that much with me at all so I just try and memorize the right pronunciations. However, when I was learning Chinese I found it to be very helpful to learn writing at the start since learning the alphabet afforded me to learn the rest of the characters, pronunciations ,and their meanings on my own afterwards.

If I were living in the country and among the natives, I would also put more emphasis on learning how to speak the language first, and then maybe later down the line I'd look into going for some lessons. I imagine that would actually make it easier to learn the writing aspect. I wish I could hear from someone who's done it this way, to get a feel of how they found the experience :)

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Writing is only second priority to me. I get more satisfaction if I acquire speaking skill first. Being able to speak the new language is a bit satisfying especially if you can successfully engage another person using the new language. The feedback is immediate compared to writing. But I do believe that acquiring the writing skill should not go far behind in your language acquisition goal.

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Writing is only second priority to me. I get more satisfaction if I acquire speaking skill first. Being able to speak the new language is a bit satisfying especially if you can successfully engage another person using the new language. The feedback is immediate compared to writing. But I do believe that acquiring the writing skill should not go far behind in your language acquisition goal.

I totally agree, takibari. I find that it's also very liberating learning to speak the language as it's spoken, without the rigid barriers that often complicate the learning process LOL Then once you've picked up some skills, adding the meat to the "frame" by learning the formalities doesn't seem as daunting :)

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I totally agree, takibari. I find that it's also very liberating learning to speak the language as it's spoken, without the rigid barriers that often complicate the learning process LOL Then once you've picked up some skills, adding the meat to the "frame" by learning the formalities doesn't seem as daunting :)

I, too, see that writing is a bit more restrictive compared to speaking. But could you care to elaborate on what you meant by rigid barriers, lushlala? I mean, what specific examples do you think beginners struggle with that hinders them from acquiring speaking skills. I'm thinking along the lines that if newbies are aware what these barriers are, they can better find a way to deal with those issues.

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I, too, see that writing is a bit more restrictive compared to speaking. But could you care to elaborate on what you meant by rigid barriers, lushlala? I mean, what specific examples do you think beginners struggle with that hinders them from acquiring speaking skills. I'm thinking along the lines that if newbies are aware what these barriers are, they can better find a way to deal with those issues.

@ takibari, by "rigid barriers" I meant the strict rules that you have to follow in learning a new language in a formal, classroom situation, from which you can't deviate. That's why I used the word "rigid". This I have to clarify, is in reference to my own personal experience, because I don't know how others view it or what their experience has been.

I find the classroom setting and formal teaching can be very daunting and challenging, as opposed to learning from friends and native speakers because that's a more informal and relaxed setting. There's not as much pressure to perform or compete against fellow students. This has always been my experience anyway.

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I think writing is very important when learning a new language. Writing helps you in many ways. Not only do you begin to make the connection with how to pronounce words (because they often do not sound how they are written) but you can begin to recognize these words when spoken at a faster rate. Also, when writing you are using your sight and sense of touch to learn. When we are little, we may learn to speak first, but when we begin speaking fluently reading and writing are usually taught together. For this reason I think it should be learned together when we are trying to absorb a new language.

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Even with English vocabulary words, I hand write the words and definitions.  It really helps it stick in my head.  Sometimes I will even write them more than once.  You might try a few things to see what works best for you.

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Writing is definitely important when you're learning a new language. I think that working on speaking is important as well but writing can make you appreciate the language more and it'd help you dive in deeper in the language and even the culture where the language came from. What I do to practice my writing is if I'm having a hard time with one word or phrase, I write it all over and over again until I feel that I can write it better. Plus, it helps me remember the word more and it'll be easier to read words when you learn writing the language as well.

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Well, writing is just as important as speaking that language to me. I simply can't learn one without learning the other and expect to be good at either without the knowledge one or the other procures for it's opposition. In other words, I think they go hand in hand.

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I think it's safe to say we all learn in different ways and have our own preferences for whatever reason. I can see where everyone is coming from regarding learning writing and speaking at the same time. I agree it probably makes you a better speaker of the language. Whether you learn faster or not, I don't know.

Personally, if I had the choice, I'd do it totally differently. I'd want to go to the country, live among the people and just ease myself into the language for about 6 months without taking any lessons. I would set about laying the foundation for my language learning process, and the way I learn; I know for a fact that once I started formal lessons this would really stand me in good stead and make my learning a lot easier :)

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I'm still VERY bad at writing cursive Hebrew, but I installed Hebrew keyboards on my phone and tablet and have made it a habit to take notes whenever I have a moment. I don't really know a lot of real sentences yet, but for example in a doctor's waiting room I'll open a memo and write down all the animal names I remember, or a list of pronouns, days of the week, whatever I can think of. Once my handwriting doesn't look like a toddler's scribblings anymore I'll be doing that as well. Physically writing things down really helps me visualise and memorise a lot better.

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I think that writing is just as important as speaking, when I first understood English it was really hard for me to write it! And I'm still really bad but with practice it has become more easy and I don't get that frustrated as I used to before practicing, it has helped me a lot with grammar too!

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Writing down words and phrases and even sentences is one way of aiding your memory in retaining what you are learning. Writing is also the best way to remember the correct pronunciation. Like in Nihonggo, there is a word that is spelled SUKA but they pronounce it sa KA only. But still, we have to write Suka so as to retain the correct spelling.

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It does not make sense to me that I can speak but not write. I should be fluent both in oral and written. Writing makes the learning more motivating and you can appreciate the language more as the rules of grammar and punctuation are being applied whereas when you speak you do not get to appreciate all of those.

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I like to write a lot, because it helps me remember conjugations for different verbs. I also like to write down new vocabulary, as it helps me remember it and it's good for me as a reference in the future. But, for me, speaking is definitely more difficult, since I need to be more confident to try and speak in a foreign language!

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Most of the time yes, I used to write on paper or maybe to repeat what it is written in order to practice with the speaking part as this enchance the learning of the language and boost also the time of learning which isn't something that I would underate.

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I strongly believe that writing is very important when it comes to learning another language. Of course, how can you be able to understand the vocabulary of this particular language if you don't even know how to spell a certain word. Language learners should never neglect the significance of language writing.

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It depends on how you want to learn a language.

My preference is to speak the language first and foremost, then learning how to write will become much easier.

However, I combine speaking with flash cards, so I can remember new vocabs much better.

In that case I do write.

It's not poetry, but I still write down new words on flash cards (in the first weeks I do this the entire time, but it gets fewer over time).

When I feel like I can recognise the new word without translating it in my head, I delete that word from my Anki decks (because I like splitting them into smaller decks).

I did this a very lot with Japanese, now those learnt words randomly pop up in my brain by just looking at the object.

Like: I see a bicycle and I automatically think: じてんしゃ (jitensha).

So long story short: writing does make sense in learning a new language, but don't go for poetry yet.

Speaking is much more important.

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In the past, I've been too focused on the written aspect of learning a new language. That has changed now, because I am required to speak and listen more than read or write, but I still think writing is very useful. It's quite obvious when the script is different than the one you're used to, but even with familiar scripts, writing really reinforces the words in my mind. Even if it is just copying out words or texts.

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Yes writing is a very important tool when learning a new and different language apart from ones own. This is because writing new words or phrases will help you recall the things dictated to you as something to always remember and apply later on. With writing, you can organize and structure the learnings you will be getting to form part of how you will apply the language in the oral sense of using it.

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