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Is English part of your education?


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English was always a primary part of our education in school. It is the same in the major towns and cities across India. All subjects like Maths,Science,History etc are all taught in English. Besides, we also studied English as a separate language!

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English has also been a fundamental part of the education in my country. But that doesn't mean that people speak it perfectly, as with any subject. But that is not surprising. In order to be fully capable of taking part in this world, you need to be able to speak and understand English.

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Wow! That's something new. An English course in an English country!

Yes, that was also my experience growing up in the U.S. In the public schools I attended, we had English classes of some kind in grades 1-12; elementary school, middle school and high school. 

In the lower grades, the emphasis was on learning grammar and spelling, and to a lesser extent writing.  In middle school we branched into study of literature and composition.  High school, it was more advanced, leaning towards literature it its various genres.  There were also advanced composition classes; essay writing and expository writing for instance.

Foreign language study was elective.  It's a shame that it was not mandatory.  But that's not typical in the U.S., at least not in public schools. 

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Actually English is part of education in many countries because in this global world who doesn't speak English or at least understand it a little bit, will be easily left behind when it comes to find a job.

However and beyond work and business matters, English is essential to communicate one another because it's an universal language that is taught around the world, even if just the basics.

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Yes, growing up in Canada, English has always been part of our education since the very beginning. We have mandatory English classes all the way up to post secondary school and a lot of the requirements to go to college or university here is to have a good grade in our English classes. I've grown up on writing essays and doing book studies and even though English is not my mother tongue, I do consider it my first language since it is my primary language I speak when I communicate.

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  • 2 weeks later...

English used to be the secondary language in my country, China. Now, every students in China are required to take English classes. English has become the main course in most school, especially in colleges and university, where international business courses are needed. English has been my education for life.

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I'm from Canada, English is one of our national languages (next to French) so yes, it is taught in school. English is mandatory from elementary school all the way until high school, where we learn to write essays properly rather than the "sandwich" approach. You can continue learning English through University and earn degrees in them as well.

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Yes, English is part of my education. I am in a college and have to study English as my main subject. It is a very easy and meaningful language, but if I fail in English then I will have to repeat my complete English classes.

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I live in the USA, and of course, English is taught in our schools. However, I never took a class on grammar after 10th grade. However, it never ceases to surprise me how many people don't have proper grammar figured out. Learning English as a second language and becoming fluent will already put you ahead of plenty of Americans.

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I live in the Philippines. English is the second language here. It is taught in all schools and many parents teach their kids how to speak in English at a very young age. In fact, there are kids here who are even better at speaking in English than in Filipino. The Philippines is also known as one of the best English speaking nations in the world.

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Guest isabbbela

In Brazil English is a mandatory class for most schools. As I went to a private school (public schools are really bad here), I had English from when I was 11 until High School graduation. Then in College I took English too, but as my English was already advanced I chose to do Business English. But yes, it's definitely a part of education here.

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Yes, we study English, not only as a subject, but most other subjects are also taught in English rather than the native language. It's even made me a lot more adept to reading and learning in English as opposed to my own language, which at this point, only makes me dizzy when I try to read it. I speak it fine, though.

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It is. In Spain we have to study English until we have 16 years, but I think that we study a very low level of the language at school compared to other countries... I had to study it out of the school because I wanted to know more and more. With the school level you could reach a FCE level after 18 years though.

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English is definitely a part of our curriculum. We are taught to speak English since preschool. The in college, we have 2 semesters that includes units for this subject. I had a blast during those years too learning English.

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Yes it is. It's a major part of our education. It's almost as important as our primary language, because at the end of High School we have to take a test on 5 subjects, and English is mandatory.

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English is the main language in our country, so yes, it is a huge part of our education. In my original country (India), it's a big part of education and it's generally the second or third language of anyone living there.

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Yes, I live in New Zealand where English is pretty much the only language widely spoken. It's compulsory to do it until year 11, although we never seem to learn a huge amount... I'd much rather learn some other languages instead, instead og going over grammar over and over again.

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Hey there. I've finished my studies already but by what I've seen during my school times, yes, english is one of the classes you've got from very early to the last years, depending on where you decide to finish, obviously. It's the same both at Portugal and France.

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English is part of the greek education system as well. Even though we reach a basic level at school, in Greece it is considered absolutely necessary to speak english. We are a country heavily based on tourism after all, so I can understand why this is normal.

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English is generally part of the school curriculum in my native country.  Since in the elementary grade, middle school, high school  and up to college level English is being taught and being used in the daily conversations at school. So I may say I am lucky because aside from my native language I had learned English since I was a kid and this helped me a lot for being able not to be afraid to travel and to communicate with English speaking people and as we all know English is the universal language.

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English is definitely a part of my education. It has been the first language since we studied in from the time I've joined school. Since my school is Anglo-Indian, i.e started by the Britishers in the 1800s, English has had a great impact on my life. You could say English is my native tongue rather than Hindi. India being a country with an immeasurable number of regional languages it becomes impossible to know all of them. Hindi used to be the language that binded us all but now for the current generation I'd say that it's English. Almost everyone in India knows English, if not fluently at least they can understand bits and pieces enough to get small work done.

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