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Linguaholic

Is English part of your education?


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It is, here in the Philippines. Since we both use Filipino and English in our daily affairs (and considering English is our second language), we have to study it ever since grade-school (kinder, too, if that counts). Which means we both have Filipino and English subjects that both teach us the Filipino and English versions of writing and speaking, respectively.

This is also applicable even during in college - we have an oral communication and writing/grammar class for Filipino and English, respectively, each a semester apart.

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Yes, English language is rigidly part of our education. It is almost our native language as while we grow up, we learn it and most of us speak this more fluently than we do our native language. Even the ones who do not and did not attend school know how to speak this. When we go to school, we are expected to have a good grasp and skill of it. It is the default medium of instruction in schools and universities. I think people here in the country where I live in give it more attention.

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In Romania, English is a staple in education, starting even at the pre-school level. French is also a very important part of High-School. I have been learning English for at least 20 years now, and most of it came from school, but also from the general media, like the Internet, TV Shows and Cinema.

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No, I'm proud to say that I learnt to speak English all on my own!  I started when I was just 16 years old, I'm not bragging at all, by the way, I'm just mentioning this because back in the day they didn't care about teaching English in most schools. 

Actually they still don't care that much about it, but they're doing better than when I was a kid, at least they're putting more effort.  That doesn't mean the kids over here will be bilingual after their education is done.  If you want your kid to be bilingual you have to send them to a specialized school to learn English well, because if you rely on the English they teach at school then your kid won't get too far in terms of learning English.

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Yes, and it's considered the first language (mainly because I was an expatriate). For locals, the first language would have been Arabic, and for me, Malayalam, but as it stands, I have been taught English as my first language!

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Yes, it's a major part of our education.

Since Swedish is a language that has a lot of loan words, and English is so common here: it's an extreme handicap here if you don't know english. English is so common here, that some teenagers even mix Swedish with English, and it's likely that in the future, we will get some mixture between Swedish and English as the modern "swedish".

I think I started learning english at the age of 7 or something, it was pretty early.

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I moved to Canada when I was young so yes, English is a huge part of our education here. When I moved here from my native country I did have a tough time fitting in but I had a lot of caring teachers who took extra time out of their lives afterschool and before school along with ESL (English as a Secondary Language) classes that helped me significantly.

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Yes, English is part of our curriculum and part of our life. I live in a country where there are many foreigners and I go to a university where English is the main language used in teaching. I also have many classmates and friends who prefer speaking English than our native tongue.

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I'll testify to that. The Philippines has a mandatory English subject from pre-school to college. Basically if you live here, there's no way you aren't going to take an English subject while you're enrolled in a school unless you're only taking a vocational course (6 month long courses).  :smile:

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In Hungary, English or German is mandatory in elementary school, from grade 4-5 (out of 8 grades). If you want to study at an university, it is mandatory to have at least one certified B1-class exam. For 80-90% of the student this language is English. Actual use of English is another thing; most of us don't even want to watch foreign series or movies with English language, only if no other option is available. Even then most people use fan-translated version of subtitles.

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In Portugal we start learning it in 4th grade when I was young, now I think kids start learning it since 1st or 2nd grade. I've had it as a class until 11th. I'm in college now and I don't have it anymore cause it's not part of my major, but I still need to for some of my classes, for books and progams we work with. So we're expected to know English.

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It's a major part of our education system, although there is a movement to increase the role of the local language in the teaching process as studies have shown that it is best to learn in through the mother tongue as the medium of instruction. As it is now, English is the main teaching language in almost all subjects of pre-primary to tertiary education.  :angel:

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English language is definitely a part and an important subject in our education system right from pre-school to college or University. Even though it is not our first language but failing English in exam means a student needs to retake it again.

For most people in my country, knowing the basic of English is very important in order to pass an interview and get jobs.

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It's kind of a requirement because while Filipino is our native language (as in, the one Filipinos native to the Philippines use), and English is our official language (as in, the one in the Constitution that should be used as a major medium in education, businesses, etc. except in subjects dealing with the native language).

So I guess it's been with the student ever since he or she begins studying, because from nursery to university education, English is somewhat a requirement for the students to be tackled. Of course, English proficiency depends on how much every student is willing to improve and learn.

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English has always been a part of our cultural heritage.  Most of the texts I have been reading are in the English language, and I actually feel awkward when trying to read a text in the native tongue.  In addition, the English language has been used not only in schools but in all forms of official business.  Filipino is used only for subjects related to the native language, but outside of the Filipino language, I actually feel uncomfortable using Filipino in subjects such as mathematics and natural sciences.  I'm more open to using Filipino in social science subjects, especially Philippine history.

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I've been studying english ever since third grade. Now I'm married to a native speaker and thinking of getting the qualifications of teaching english in middle/high-schools, so I guess you could say that english has been and most likely will be a pretty big part of my education :) Although I'm still horrible at written english I think I'm pretty fluent with spoken language.

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