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The main purpose of learning French


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Sometimes I feel like myself I'm repeating the same words, but maybe I'm not. Every language is specific, meanwhile they share things as well. For example, the English language is used as a communication language between many countries and the main reason of learning it would be probably either that, or because you would go for UK, US, Canada, or any other English-speaking country (there's a lot, think about it).

Now, for French, it's less straightforward, there's only ~70 million of French speakers worldwide. So, what would be the purpose of learning French? Why are you doing that? Hobby? Real purpose for your future?

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Well, as for me, knowing French is pretty crucial, as it is one of the four national languages in Switzerland. Knowing French improves my chances to get a good job in Switzerland. French is of course not needed for all the jobs here but it is in many cases considered to be at least a valuable asset. Moreover, French is still really international and there are quite a lot of French communities all over the world. All over the world is maybe a little bit exaggerated, though :=)

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My reason for learning French was career wise. I lived in Dominican Republic (island in the Caribbean) for several years, and was studying law there. Even though it is a mostly Spanish speaking country, its Civil Code is Napoleonic. Therefore, anyone studying Law, had to study French as a prerequisite to graduating. I've since graduated, but still continue to study French. It's just such a beautiful language, and hey the more languages you know, the better.  

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I plan to start learning french once I am done with dutch, simply because I will be living in a country that is very close to France and Belgium. There is a big chance I can get a better job if I become fluent in french.  I would also like to learn German after that, for the same reason.  Over there a lot good jobs ask for people who speak English, Spanish,  dutch, German and french! That sounds like a lot languages, but I believe I'm half-way :)  Very soon I might be fluent in Dutch, I am already fluent in both English and Spanish. 

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Well, as for me, knowing French is pretty crucial, as it is one of the four national languages in Switzerland. Knowing French improves my chances to get a good job in Switzerland. French is of course not needed for all the jobs here but it is in many cases considered to be at least a valuable asset. Moreover, French is still really international and there are quite a lot of French communities all over the world. All over the world is maybe a little bit exaggerated, though :=)

You count twice German in the official languages, or I miss something? Because I only think about Italian, French and German (and its friend Switzerland-German). You count the both German because they're different enough, or that's just a commodity, or I'm missing a language? But I understand easily the problem of Switzerland since it feels like the population is polyglot with all these languages.

My reason for learning French was career wise. I lived in Dominican Republic (island in the Caribbean) for several years, and was studying law there. Even though it is a mostly Spanish speaking country, its Civil Code is Napoleonic. Therefore, anyone studying Law, had to study French as a prerequisite to graduating. I've since graduated, but still continue to study French. It's just such a beautiful language, and hey the more languages you know, the better.  

Uh. Wow, I didn't thought about that. French-written Civil laws, but Spanish-speaking country. And no one thinks about translating it instead of keeping it as it is? I mean, law should be easily accessible to the population, that's something severe if they can't understand the laws straight away, since you have to obey to laws you don't understand.

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I want to learn it because I'd love to live in Canada once I'm done studying. I know French is probably only important in places like Quebec. I have a cousin who lives there though, and if I do end up moving to Canada it'll probably be there.

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I want to learn it because I'd love to live in Canada once I'm done studying. I know French is probably only important in places like Quebec. I have a cousin who lives there though, and if I do end up moving to Canada it'll probably be there.

To be more precise, Ontario and Quebec both features much of the French-speaking population, and Quebec more than Ontario. But don't forget Quebec features Montreal, a well-known city of Canada, and Ontario features Toronto and Ottawa, the most popular city of the state, and the Canada's capital, respectively. So, there's important cities with "significant" (it is relative, depending of Ontario vs. Quebec) part of the population speaking French. As well, both languages are officially featured and used. So, even if you don't plan to go to Quebec, knowing French when you're in Canada isn't that stupid. The usage will be low if you live outside of these two provinces, but I guess not useless.

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I want to learn it because I'd love to live in Canada once I'm done studying. I know French is probably only important in places like Quebec. I have a cousin who lives there though, and if I do end up moving to Canada it'll probably be there.

I am American and lived in the states for most of my life, but two years ago I married a Canadian and moved to British Columbia. It's nowhere near the French-speaking mecca of Quebec, but it's on the streets enough to pique my interest. There is also the novelty of every product label being in both English and French (being American, I am more used to seeing Spanish on labels). 

I have been juggling the idea of seriously taking up French since moving, but haven't fully committed yet. I have learned some words and phrases and picked up on things from the aforementioned labels (that immersion aspect is admittedly pretty great). Sometimes I wish I could teleport to Montreal for a few days , to experience complete immersion and see if its something I want to pursue - after learning my first foreign language, I realized seriously committing to a language isn't something I take lightly.

The other reason I am curious about French is the music - the music can be so beautiful! For some reason, I especially love rap in French! The flow of the language works so well in it. 

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If I were to learn French, I think it would be because of hobby. Learning French has crossed my mind multiple times, and I see the language itself as 'sexy' and somewhat 'exotic'. But I never actually got myself to learn it yet because I can't see myself using it in the future, and it'd just.. deteriorate, you know? When I learn a new language I also try to take into account how useful it would be for me. Like I wouldn't learn some random African language, because I would never get to use it. And the effort and time I've put into learning the language would just go to waste.

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I'm Canadian and our second official language is French. This means that whenever you are applying for any kind of job involving interacting with people, having both French and English will put you ahead of other applicants who only have one language or the other. Some jobs, especially government positions or positions in more bilingual cities such as Ottawa, actually require you to have at least basic skills in both languages. I currently work in a customer service position in a smaller city a couple hours away from Ottawa and we have French speakers come through all the time. I would love to be able to get confident enough in my abilities to speak to them properly! 

I also have some friends who go to party in Montreal occasionally, which is also just a few hours away by train from where I live. I've heard that Montreal has a lot of English speakers for a city in Quebec, but I'd also like to be confident enough not to worry about finding someone who speaks English when I eventually go with them for a visit! The nightlife is supposed to be pretty excellent...

I guess more broadly I feel like learning new languages generally is a great way to broaden your access to communicating with different people and enjoying different cultural works than you would have access to otherwise. So another reason why I'd like to get a better understanding of French is because I enjoy French media, like music and movies and books, and would love to get to a place where I can enjoy those things without constantly needing to check google translate. :)

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Well Actually I've learnt French in the school, so I didn't really choose it, but once you learn it you'll discover that it's really a romantical language, you can use it to express your feelings lol, also if you start listening to french music, you'll like it ! it's true it's not a really famous language, but it still good to learn an Academycal language like French !

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The reason I started learning French was mainly out of pure interest. I'd grown up going to the school library from a very young age, and I'd see these books in a 'weird' language with interesting characters, and had no clue what it was. We weren't offered any foreign languages in states schools at the time. Years later I found out that the language was French, and my interest grew, until I decided I'd take it as a Minor at university. Upon completion of my studies, I continued to study it privately. I love the language and feel it's one of the most beautiful languages ever. My journey with the French language although on the back burner for now, is far from over.

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I have a few reasons for learning french. One is that I find the language completely captivating and beautiful. It sounds so beautiful when spoken. To me it sounds like poetry. Another reason is that many of my older family members are all fluent in French. My great aunts and my grandparents would all be thrilled if I learned and it will help me feel conected to my heritage. 

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Right now I am learning French because my boyfriend and I want to vacation in France. We also want to visit Canada and dine in parts of the French Canadian areas so we would like to be able to order in French. I think it is fun to learn a new language and it helps with your brain development. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I have a few reasons for learning french. One is that I find the language completely captivating and beautiful. It sounds so beautiful when spoken. To me it sounds like poetry. Another reason is that many of my older family members are all fluent in French. My great aunts and my grandparents would all be thrilled if I learned and it will help me feel conected to my heritage. 

I think that's a good reason to learn French if it can help to connect to your grandparents and so on. Maybe you would discover thing. But also, it's not critical so it eases up the pressure you may have.

Right now I am learning French because my boyfriend and I want to vacation in France. We also want to visit Canada and dine in parts of the French Canadian areas so we would like to be able to order in French. I think it is fun to learn a new language and it helps with your brain development. 

It's simple, but fully relevant. Out of the ~70,000,000 of French native speakers, it wasn't that likely that your boyfriend was one of them, but it happens that yes. Wonder if you find that a luck or rather something to overcome :P

I'm Canadian and our second official language is French. This means that whenever you are applying for any kind of job involving interacting with people, having both French and English will put you ahead of other applicants who only have one language or the other. Some jobs, especially government positions or positions in more bilingual cities such as Ottawa, actually require you to have at least basic skills in both languages. I currently work in a customer service position in a smaller city a couple hours away from Ottawa and we have French speakers come through all the time. I would love to be able to get confident enough in my abilities to speak to them properly! 

I also have some friends who go to party in Montreal occasionally, which is also just a few hours away by train from where I live. I've heard that Montreal has a lot of English speakers for a city in Quebec, but I'd also like to be confident enough not to worry about finding someone who speaks English when I eventually go with them for a visit! The nightlife is supposed to be pretty excellent...

I guess more broadly I feel like learning new languages generally is a great way to broaden your access to communicating with different people and enjoying different cultural works than you would have access to otherwise. So another reason why I'd like to get a better understanding of French is because I enjoy French media, like music and movies and books, and would love to get to a place where I can enjoy those things without constantly needing to check google translate. :)

I also thinks languages are like the borders: if you can cross them, you are suddenly more free to do new things, to discover something else than you know actually. And Canada is in a weird bilingual nature that make French learning relevant. But is it really relevant, or just kept culturally?

I am American and lived in the states for most of my life, but two years ago I married a Canadian and moved to British Columbia. It's nowhere near the French-speaking mecca of Quebec, but it's on the streets enough to pique my interest. There is also the novelty of every product label being in both English and French (being American, I am more used to seeing Spanish on labels). 

I have been juggling the idea of seriously taking up French since moving, but haven't fully committed yet. I have learned some words and phrases and picked up on things from the aforementioned labels (that immersion aspect is admittedly pretty great). Sometimes I wish I could teleport to Montreal for a few days , to experience complete immersion and see if its something I want to pursue - after learning my first foreign language, I realized seriously committing to a language isn't something I take lightly.

The other reason I am curious about French is the music - the music can be so beautiful! For some reason, I especially love rap in French! The flow of the language works so well in it. 

But you're still married with her or him? Because if it is no longer the case, maybe you slow down the learning because it makes you remember your marriage. Who knows.

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I'm not sure I know the reason for starting to learn French. Somehow I always knew I would - my mum says that when I was very little, when people asked me what I'd do when I grow up, I replied "I'll learn to speak French!". I got down to it when I was 14 and I've been in love with this language ever since. There are so many exciting things about France and its culture - and I was able to discover it all only when I started to learn French.

I guess some things you cannot really explain. Just as it was with my first visit to Poland: when I came here fist, I knew it was the right place for me to be, even though I hadn't met my partner back then.

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The reason I learn french is because of school requirements. I come from Lebanon where the only extra language you'd learn is French, not Spanish. Thus I took it back there. When I moved abroad, I was still required to take a second language and thus I stuck to my original choice. I like learning the language but I probably won't have much use of it though.

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I'm not sure I know the reason for starting to learn French. Somehow I always knew I would - my mum says that when I was very little, when people asked me what I'd do when I grow up, I replied "I'll learn to speak French!". I got down to it when I was 14 and I've been in love with this language ever since. There are so many exciting things about France and its culture - and I was able to discover it all only when I started to learn French.

I guess some things you cannot really explain. Just as it was with my first visit to Poland: when I came here fist, I knew it was the right place for me to be, even though I hadn't met my partner back then.

That's a nice story, but a story I have hard time to understand logically: how can you like French that young? But it's still a nice story and it feels like you're pretty lucky with how it happened. That's the good thing here: you did what you wanted and you feel happy to have done that. So that wasn't a bad choice and that's what matters.

The reason I learn french is because of school requirements. I come from Lebanon where the only extra language you'd learn is French, not Spanish. Thus I took it back there. When I moved abroad, I was still required to take a second language and thus I stuck to my original choice. I like learning the language but I probably won't have much use of it though.

Just a question: why would you want to rather learn Spanish rather than French? I don't have nothing against it but the fact you quote this one makes me wonder if it means anything or not. Especially since your profile says you still not try to learn Spanish.

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  • 1 month later...
On 11/8/2015, 5:39:27, FlagOnce said:

Just a question: why would you want to rather learn Spanish rather than French? I don't have nothing against it but the fact you quote this one makes me wonder if it means anything or not. Especially since your profile says you still not try to learn Spanish.

A bit old, I know, however, I thought it would be fair to answer it even after all this time has passed. The reason I quoted Spanish is because I am now given the opportunity to learn Spanish at my new school, and also because, it is somewhat of a standard for students to choose between either French, Spanish, and sometimes German in schools as a secondary language. However, this was not the case in my old school in Lebanon, which is why I found it somewhat relevant, to mention the Spanish language.

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 11/3/2015, 3:00:55, anna3101 said:

I'm not sure I know the reason for starting to learn French. Somehow I always knew I would - my mum says that when I was very little, when people asked me what I'd do when I grow up, I replied "I'll learn to speak French!". I got down to it when I was 14 and I've been in love with this language ever since. There are so many exciting things about France and its culture - and I was able to discover it all only when I started to learn French.

 

Awww, that is so cute!  When people asked me what I wanted to do when I grow up I never knew what to say, lol.  Even now I'm not so sure i picked the right path.  But my love for languages started very early as well.  Languages changed my life!  

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  • 7 months later...

I started learning French for school, but I had the option between French and Spanish, and I chose French because my dad's side of the family is French Canadian and their first language is French, and I want to be able to communicate with them easier.

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I started learning French the summer before my freshman year of high school. I absolutely obsessed over it from the moment I woke up to the moment I fell asleep for a good month. The main reason I had for learning French was because of how pretty I thought it sounded (I'm a Libra, I'm shallow  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ ). Although it had the added benefit of giving me something to do during the summer.

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