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"Tu me saoules"

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We're talking about popular idioms? Here's a good one. "Tu me saoules !", basically meaning "You get me annoyed" (I am not sure it is correct English, but idioms is idioms!), and have probably nothing related to the fact of being drunk, is something you will hear often in French language when you are annoying in someone's else eyes. Yes, it's not something you would like to hear, but often, the idioms you need the hardest to understand...is the negative ones. Just so you don't look like someone lost because some throw words at you in their native languages (feels a bit easy, no?).

That's why I post about it. Please comment about the quality of the translation in your opinion (I think I'm correct, just not perfect) and about other idioms that feels negative in French and you would like to know more about.

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Indeed, it basically can be translated as "You annoy me", although as you know when it gets to the point where you actually do say "tu me saoules" (or "tu me gaves"/"tu me gonfles") to someone, the level of annoyance that person has generated is fairly important, and in English to pinpoint out the level of exasperation the equivalent would be " You annoy the living hell out of me".

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I would say also in English ''you feed me up'' or ''I'm fed up with you'' as ''saouler'' and ''gaver'' are two verbs that describe also fill up/feeding up something/someone in English.

Quote

 

Je me saoule avec du vin - I'm filling up with wine

Je me gave de pizzas - I'm feeding up with pizza 

 

3

But notice that both expressions implement the idea of ''too much'' of something, it's used to literally say that you either eat/drink to much and so, in this context, when you use it like ''tu me gave / tu me saoule'' it has too be understood as ''you feed me too much'' which at the end of the day result in ''I'm fed up with you''.

 

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13 hours ago, Felix Brassier said:

I would say also in English ''you feed me up'' or ''I'm fed up with you'' as ''saouler'' and ''gaver'' are two verbs that describe also fill up/feeding up something/someone in English.

But notice that both expressions implement the idea of ''too much'' of something, it's used to literally say that you either eat/drink to much and so, in this context, when you use it like ''tu me gave / tu me saoule'' it has too be understood as ''you feed me too much'' which at the end of the day result in ''I'm fed up with you''.

 

very interesting! thanks Felix!

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On 12/20/2015 at 11:01 AM, Kangoo said:

Indeed, it basically can be translated as "You annoy me", although as you know when it gets to the point where you actually do say "tu me saoules" (or "tu me gaves"/"tu me gonfles") to someone, the level of annoyance that person has generated is fairly important, and in English to pinpoint out the level of exasperation the equivalent would be " You annoy the living hell out of me".

Indeed! The favorite idiom of my daughter when she was 15 years old. " Papa, tu me saoules" when asked if she has done her homework or  where she is going out (and with who). Could be used in order to not give an answer... Grandfather is nowadays teaching her granddaughter "tu me saoules" in order to answer mum :-)

Aussi "tu m'emmerdes" ou "tu me casses les pieds".

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