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Words that are not used anymore.


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Do you know of any words that are no longer used in the English vocabulary? I remember reading words like "twattle" in classic novels, meaning "to gossip", or "beef-witted" meaning "stupid or imbecile". I quite liked these words and feel they should never have gone out of use. Are there any such words in your mind that you wish were still there?

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I love learning old words, too. I have a couple of books with such terms in them.  Here are a few random examples:

pumpkinification:  exaggerated praise or acting in a pompous manner. 

Trantles: articles of little value

Foofing: A dog howling or crying in a pathetic or sad manner.

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I am also a fan of obsolete and archaic words.  Some of them are so memorable it's a wonder they have gone out of fashion.  Here are a few that I like.

Apricity = warm sunshine in the winter.  A really beautiful word!

Scriptitation = continuously writing.  Yes, I can relate!

Sweven = a dream or vision.  Another gorgeous word that's been lost. 

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Great job finding all those words above.  I had never heard of any of them.  Thank you for the information!  Did you have to look them up or did you really know what they meant etc?

I always like to look words up to double check their meanings and spellings.  It's a persistent habit of mine when writing, especially with words that I don't use on a daily basis that suddenly seem to fit the context. 

I had heard of all of these words, but wanted to make sure of spelling as well as definition.  I can remember "sweven" from way back in college, I encountered it in a classic novel somewhere and I remember being really struck by the sound of the word as well as the look of it.  I just thought it was such a cool word! 

There are also words and slang expressions from old Hollywood movies that are not used anymore that I like.  "On the lam," for instance, is an expression you hear a lot in the film noir classics of the 1940s and 1950s.  It means to be on the run, as in being a fugitive.

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Some older words and phrases are retained in some dialects while becoming obsolete in others. For example, "pitcher" is still commonly used in the United States while most British English speakers (there might be some areas in the UK where the word is still maintained), would say "jug". To most British people, using "pitcher" to refer to a container for pouring water sounds almost mediaeval!

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I agree apricity just sounds lovely and the meaning is quite nice too.

Did anyone ever hear of eyelashes being called eyewinkers? I heard my grandma use it--didn't know if it were her word of a real word? I spent a lot of time with her, I should remember more words she used.

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I agree apricity just sounds lovely and the meaning is quite nice too.

Did anyone ever hear of eyelashes being called eyewinkers? I heard my grandma use it--didn't know if it were her word of a real word? I spent a lot of time with her, I should remember more words she used.

Actually "eyewinker" is in the dictionary and it mean "eyelash"  and "eyelid."  It has a third meaning, too;  it refers to a foreign object that gets into the eye and causes irritation, leading someone to start winking to try to dislodge it. 

I think it's a great word; I hadn't heard of it before.  I think it's kind of poetic.

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There are some words in english that I haven't heard in a long time (guess they're dead now), which is a pity because it seems people nowdays is trying to communicate using less words than before.

- Snoutfair: A person with a beautiful face

- Wonder-wench: A true sweetheart

- Spermologer: Not what you are thinking, lol!  It's basically what we know as a columnist nowadays :)

- Tyromancy: Divining by the coagulation of cheese;

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I never hear people use the word "dais" anymore.  It means a stand that you step onto when delivering a speech at a podium.  I've seen the word in written text but I've never heard anyone actually say the word in all of my life.  Whenever I use it in conversation nobody knows what I am talking about!

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I never hear people use the word "dais" anymore.  It means a stand that you step onto when delivering a speech at a podium.  I've seen the word in written text but I've never heard anyone actually say the word in all of my life.  Whenever I use it in conversation nobody knows what I am talking about!

Actually, the word is in pretty common use in schools in colleges here. Its not like you hear it every day but once in a while someone will use it at an important function while calling someone to the 'dais'.

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Actually, the word is in pretty common use in schools in colleges here. Its not like you hear it every day but once in a while someone will use it at an important function while calling someone to the 'dais'.

Where is "here"?  I don't see your location below your name.  I am in the United States.  I never hear anybody use the word.  When I say it people look at me like I am an alien.

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I'm not really old but I remember "gay" used to also mean happy. I'm not exactly sure if it's being used these days to mean happy although I know it's more popularly used for "homosexual".

That is a good one.  I'll see the word "gay" used in literature from time to time.  Usually older English authors like D.H. Lawrence used it but I don't hear anyone using it nowadays unless they are referring to someone who is a homosexual. 
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I take note of words that aren't much in use anymore and add them to my vocabulary. It throws people off sometimes, they'll understand the meaning but will ask where I learned it. Of course, I never use antiquated words with second language speakers, as it would be inconsiderate.

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Here are some words which are no longer in use in the English Language:

1. Uhtceare    This word means to "lie awake before dawn and start worrying." I found out that recorded

                    being in use only once.

2. Expergefactor This is anything that wakes you up. This could be an alarm clock or a very noisy person.

3. Mugwump      This means an authority figure who is above petty squabbles and fights.

These words sound so weird!  :amazed: It's hard to believe that these were actually used in the English Language.

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Many times I'm confused about oftentimes.

I read that "oftentimes" is actually an archaic form substituted by "many times" but I have found "oftentimes" in articles published by serious online sites including The New York Times.

So that, it's "oftentimes" that nobody uses anymore or is still used "oftentimes"?

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I often use obscure or archaic words that I like the sound of. I told my nephew once in a golf match that I thought he was trying to 'hornswaggle' me. He asked what that meant. I told him it meant to cheat me. He said it was a silly word. I retorted that it was a great word that just did not get used nearly often enough and I was trying to change that. He laughed. Now, whenever he thinks someone is cheating, he accuses them of hornswaggling him. We do what we can to enrich and revitalize the language. :smile:

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Very true!

I remember to have read some archaic words that cannot remember right away because they aren't longer in use, but that sound appealing, original or more self-explanatory than those for which were substituted.

Would be worth dare to rescue them and get them back to life in our daily vocabulary.

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