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Linguaholic
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Okay, it's more a little challenge than something I hardly need since I succeeded to understand the meaning. But, understand the meaning and being able to express it is your own language, or to explain it, is not the same thing. That's why, for those who wants to do the challenge, I would ask you two things:
1. Try to find the appropriate meaning. I'll provide the idiom that bugs me below.
2. Translate it in all languages you're fluent in. And try, if you want, in languages where you learn. As you want.

So, the idiom is the "fire-fueled haze" that affects a country. It affects a country because it cause problems to the agriculture.

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"fire-fueled haze" isn't an idiom; you can figure it out by understanding each word individually. And in theory it could have figurative meanings too, so it's alway good to give a lot of context, but I'll tell you what it most likely means.

In Thailand farmers often set huge fires in the countryside to quickly and easily clear land for future cultivation. The smoke from the fires makes the air hazy for miles around. This is a form of pollution, and causes health problems in humans. It can also cause health problems for livestock, and could negatively impact other agriculture. The fire is what creates and sustains, or "fuels", the haze, so you can call it "fire-fueled haze".

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"fire-fueled haze" isn't an idiom; you can figure it out by understanding each word individually. And in theory it could have figurative meanings too, so it's alway good to give a lot of context, but I'll tell you what it most likely means.

In Thailand farmers often set huge fires in the countryside to quickly and easily clear land for future cultivation. The smoke from the fires makes the air hazy for miles around. This is a form of pollution, and causes health problems in humans. It can also cause health problems for livestock, and could negatively impact other agriculture. The fire is what creates and sustains, or "fuels", the haze, so you can call it "fire-fueled haze".

This is a kind of idiom since it is a very specific (but it's the way it should be written) way to write the meaning of what you said. It could have been written other ways, and fuel made me think at a first glance that fuel powered the fire and got me confused. After, this isn't only traditional to East Asia, I already saw this in the past from local farmers, so maybe it is more widespread at that location, but I think it happens a bit everywhere, or in a lot of places at least.

Doesn't look so good, the phenomena, after.

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