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Linguaholic

Delayed training


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Okay, that's not a clear name, but let me describe the idea and you'll get it right straight away. I hope.
When we think about a teacher interaction, it's either you read a book with exercises and you're doing it basically alone, or someone is correcting you but is not making the book or writing it, they just give comments to help you, or it's a teacher speaking and trying to make you learn things by hearing what he's saying, in real time.
But what about another approach: you read a first chapter of a book the teacher made. You answer exercises, send back to the teacher, but this time, he will write few paragraphs of notes about weaknesses, what should be corrected, he would explains concept to help you, and let continue his "book" but with that in mind.

That would allow training with a teacher without especially being tied to it at fixed hours. What do you think?

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That's basically what edx courses do. In the one I'm taking, I watch a video the teacher made (which comes with notes and subtitles), and do homework. The homework is automatically corrected, but she will give personal feedback for anything above and beyond the auto-corrected stuff, for example, if you decide to submit a short essay. There is a midterm and a final too. I think this system works fairly well, but I'm not sure if it's as good as a "normal" class.

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That's basically what edx courses do. In the one I'm taking, I watch a video the teacher made (which comes with notes and subtitles), and do homework. The homework is automatically corrected, but she will give personal feedback for anything above and beyond the auto-corrected stuff, for example, if you decide to submit a short essay. There is a midterm and a final too. I think this system works fairly well, but I'm not sure if it's as good as a "normal" class.

 

Why would it certainly take longer than in normal class? I mean, in normal class, what happens is that you can get slices of time with your teacher when you ask questions, but outside of that you don't have many communication: you just hear what the teacher says. And between watching a video, reading his teaching book or having in front of your, the difference for learning isn't sharp.

I think it would take longer but may be worth it.  It gives you time to absorb what you are learning before moving on.  It also allows the teacher to correct with feeling rushed, therefore reducing mistakes.

The basis of current teaching is to learn a block, then another block, bundle them together to talk about a third block. If you don't understand the first or the second block, it's just a big problem and that's when it's too much linear, after all.

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Why would it certainly take longer than in normal class?

Why are you directing this question towards me?

And between watching a video, reading his teaching book or having in front of your, the difference for learning isn't sharp.

Sharp? I don't understand your sentence.

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Why would it certainly take longer than in normal class? I mean, in normal class, what happens is that you can get slices of time with your teacher when you ask questions, but outside of that you don't have many communication: you just hear what the teacher says. And between watching a video, reading his teaching book or having in front of your, the difference for learning isn't sharp.

The basis of current teaching is to learn a block, then another block, bundle them together to talk about a third block. If you don't understand the first or the second block, it's just a big problem and that's when it's too much linear, after all.

See, that's kind of the problem.  Some people learn differently.  For instance, I am dyslexic.  I can only study with notes that are different colors.  Granted, I can use the current methods of teaching, but not everyone can.  There are many learning disabilities.  I just don't think that people who can't understand the teaching methods (not won't...can't) should be penalized.  A lot of people end up hating school or never learning something they have been struggling with because their brains can't process the way they are being taught. 

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