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"I love you" in all the languages of the world!


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2 minutes ago, naiara said:

"Eu te amo" this is the Portuguese version, it  looks a lot like Spanish, both beautiful languages. I would give Portuguese a shot, good luck! 

This is more similar to Italian :D

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On 12/12/2015, 7:24:54, Richard.H said:

사랑 해요 (salang haeyo)

I wanted to note that I personally pronounce that as saranghaeyo or sah-rahng-haee-yoh. The only thing that is a bit tricky is that the Korean 'R' sounds a bit like an 'L' so it would be pronounced with a letter half way between an R and L.

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3 minutes ago, aliangel3499 said:

I wanted to note that I personally pronounce that as saranghaeyo or sah-rahng-haee-yoh. The only thing that is a bit tricky is that the Korean 'R' sounds a bit like an 'L' so it would be pronounced with a letter half way between an R and L.

very true!

same thing with Japanese. R is R but it does lean towards the L a little bit. Latin characters don't really have a way of making this distinction clear though.

I'm open for suggestions though :P

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@bmcleod19 You're welcome! :)

@Richard.H Since when i'm studing Korean i have to admit that the pronunciation of some words is really hard, because is way different from western languages! But i think that the the R in "Sarang" is more like an R than like an L, it's just less marked. Correct me if i'm wrong :)

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6 hours ago, Mameha said:

@bmcleod19 You're welcome! :)

@Richard.H Since when i'm studing Korean i have to admit that the pronunciation of some words is really hard, because is way different from western languages! But i think that the the R in "Sarang" is more like an R than like an L, it's just less marked. Correct me if i'm wrong :)

Think of a mix of L and R for the east-Asian languages.
In the case of Japanese, I always use a 'pure' R sound and I still get understood.

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On 14 December 2015 at 7:15:18 PM, rtorir said:

The expression I love you in Swahili is `nakupenda', followed by the the name of the one you love. For example. Nakupenda mama literally meaning I love you mom.

Oh I remember that from a friend teaching it to me years ago, @rtorir! I do love sound of Swahili, it sounds very melodic. I think 'nakupenda' sounds so romantic, too :) It's a shame I never learnt much more than that from my Kenyan friends. 

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  • 1 month later...

I think it's really neat how so many languages have two ways of saying "I love you" (one for a romantic partner and the other for a close friend etc.). Even though many of my relatives are Italian, I didn't know how to say "I love you" until reading this thread so thank you Mameha for teaching me! As an American, I know how to say "I love you" and even though there is no other way to say it in English, I think what makes it different from when we say it to a love interest versus the way it's said to your son or daughter is HOW it's said or delivered through body language. The only other way I know how to say "I love you" is in Russian (Ya libloo tibya). As far as I know, as in English this is the only way although that seems a little odd as Russian does break down other words in a male or female, familiar or unfamiliar structure. A thread like this shows me (as if I didn't really know already LOL!) that there are many things about languages I should know but have yet to learn! For instance being of Italian/Russian heritage but only knowing a few words, being Jewish but not knowing how to say "I love you". I guess the universal way to show affection is with a smile, everyone understands that.   

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Well since my native tongue is English, body language is important in how you deliver the phrase/term "I love you", but the thing that I find the most important is whether or not you mean it. Because in the end no matter how many times you say it, the fact that they/you mean it makes it all the more meaningful <3 (Happy Early/Late Valentines Day!! <3) 

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  • 3 weeks later...
15 hours ago, Wanda Kaishin said:

大好き is about 10 times more common. 

But unlike 愛する, you can't make a verb out of 大好き (I think). :P

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3 hours ago, Blaveloper said:

But unlike 愛する, you can't make a verb out of 大好き (I think). :P

It's by far the most common way for Japanese people to express "I love you", which is the topic of this thread. Is it a verb? I think it depends on how you define a verb, but this is completely irrelevant to the thread topic.

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