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So, just finished learning hiragana and katakana, reading and writing, got it all memorized. and with that, was my first goal. now, I'm just keep exercising for one day or two, but then will come the kanji phase... and for that I still don't know what to do. Should I try to learning how to write or just the reading? how do I first approach it? what articles should I read before starting it?
Till now, I just have read some history, and some superficial stuff, I also got a app that show images and the kanji... but, I feel that it's completely different from my kana study. Well, how did you approached it and it worked? give me a light "(>__<)9

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I'm currently using WaniKani, which works like a charm.
I memorise more and more Kanji AND vocabulary every single day!

Before I used WaniKani, I tried some flashcards from KanjiDamage and even though they have everything you want and need to know, KD also has some Kanji that are meaningless to me.
It's almost like you're required to have a PhD to understand the meaning of a particular Kanji, because they won't explain you any synonyms.

By the way, KanjiDamage has an awesome page filled with Kanji facts.
I highly recommend you to read it: http://www.kanjidamage.com/kanji_facts

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Just now, Blaveloper said:

I'm currently using WaniKani, which works like a charm.
I memorise more and more Kanji AND vocabulary every single day!

Before I used WaniKani, I tried some flashcards from KanjiDamage and even though they have everything you want and need to know, KD also has some Kanji that are meaningless to me.
It's almost like you're required to have a PhD to understand the meaning of a particular Kanji, because they won't explain you any synonyms.

By the way, KanjiDamage has an awesome page filled with Kanji facts.
I highly recommend you to read it: http://www.kanjidamage.com/kanji_facts

Thank you so much Blaveloper! man, I'm having so much fun reading the 'kanji facts' section on KD, you don't even know! also, just finished to make my account on wanikani, and did the tour, the site and the system seems so professional! but I'm kinda afraid that I'll have to pay something in some part... like I live in brazil, and here a dolar it's worth 4 times the local currency, I basically can't afford nothing from other countries" (oAo)"

Can clarify if there is any kind of service of those links you passed that I'll have to pay, and if so, how much? like, both look pretty essential, so if theres a moment I gotta pay to continue, maybe if save some money... I don't know, but I'm really motivated and feeling ready to start!

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@keslersan After you get passed level 3 on WaniKani, you'll need to pay 10 dollar a month, 100 dollar a year or 199 dollar for a lifetime (which is currently a discount, it's 299 normally).
KanjiDamage is free of charge and so is the Anki flashcard app (except for the iOS version).

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@Blaveloper man, I was hoping I would be able to fully use wanikani, the system really got my interest... oh well. Do you think would still be [time-consuming] useful to still do the only lv3 on wani kani? also, can I manage with just the KD and the anki app?

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Depends.
If you have absolutely no knowledge to Kanji, going up to level 3 may give you a nice entry point to the rest of the Kanji.
If you already know basic Kanji, you may rather be wasting your time.

As for KanjiDamage, it's doable and maybe even faster if you set your app to 50 new flash cards a day.
But be cautious about that, it may either overwhelm you or bore you out, especially when you set the review cards to anything higher than 100 cards a day as well.

Learning all the Kanji can be a pain, but once you know them it always feels rewarding.

全部学ぶことになっていましたか? (Did you already decide to learn all of them?)
チャレンジをとると思いますか? (Do you think you can take the challenge?)
(Just to demonstrate some more advanced grammar here, lol.)

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haha what a show off!

Since I'll stop with wanikani midpoint anyway, I'll just stick with KD and Anki combo. Although it's less material than I'm used ot, but, I that with the information on 'how to kanji' it's best to focus on only one source.

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