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alieangeles

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Posts posted by alieangeles


  1. On 12/14/2015 at 9:50 PM, OmniHead said:

    Don't worry means literally "no te preocupes" in Spanish.

    Spanish speaking people may say someone;

    "No te preocupes, todo va a salir bien" (Don't worry, everything is going to be okay") and this is the grammatically correct way to use the term.

     

     

    This is correct. It is also common in some countries to say the word "descuida", which basically means don't worry. Literally it translates into disregard or neglect.


  2. On 10/21/2015 at 4:29 AM, Fegg said:

    Homonymous are words that are written the same but mean different things. Paronimous sound very similar but mean different things. Do you know any homonymous/paronimous?

    I´ll let here a classic:

    Ay (expression) -->  Hay (verb) --> Ahí (adverb)

    Another:

    Azar (noun)= Fate --> Azahar (noun)= Orange blossom

    Anyone can guess this next homonymous? 

    Cojo/Cojo

     

    I believe cojo has several meanings! First as a swear word, then as a verb, then as a name for someone with a limp. Another good one is:

    halla - haya - allá


  3. On 2/9/2016 at 1:04 AM, Meow said:

    I'm not currently studying ASL, but it's a fascinating language. Have you found any good resources for it? I don't really want to ask anyone to practice with me until I have at least a little knowledge because I feel like I'm wasting their time!

    I'm studying ASL and I agree, it is a fascinating language! It also has many resources to be found online. My favorites are:

    signingsavvy.com

    handspeak.com

    lifeprint.com

    I'd be happy to answer any questions!


  4. It can also be ggggg, as the G is pronounced as j. This is mostly used amongst youngsters. As well as using a 2 at the end of a verb instead of "do/s". E.g: *lloran2*

    An x as "por". Or xq as "porque".

    "Khe" as "Que".

    Similar to the first one: 100talo or 100timientos. Basically anything that uses a number instead of spelling out the sound. 


  5. My name is Alie and I am from Anzoategui, Venezuela, but I grew up in the United States. My main native language is English and I am fluent in Spanish as well. Languages and linguistics are a passion of mine, especially sign language, which seems to be a pretty unpopular language interest in this forum, but it is a huge interest of mine. I am intermediate in ASL and am learning my own country's sign language. I like YouTubing, drawing, reading, writing and of course, learning. If anyone wants to chat or do a language exchange, please don't be shy, I don't bite! Thanks for reading, have a wonderful day. :)

    Me llamo Alie y vengo de Anzoategui, Venezuela, pero me criaron en EE.UU. Mi idioma nativa principal es el ingles, y también hablo español fluidamente. Los idiomas y la lingüística son una pasión mía, especialmente lenguaje de señas, lo cual no parece ser muy popular como idioma de interés en este forum, pero si es un interés grandisimo mio. Estoy a nivel intermediado en el Lenguaje de Señas Americana (ASL) y estoy aprendiendo el lenguaje de señas de mi propio país. Me gusta YouTubear, dibujar, leer, escribir y, claro, aprender. Si alguien quiere tener un chat or hacer un intercambia de idiomas, por favor sin miedo, que yo no muerdo! Gracias por leer, ten un día maravilloso. :)


  6. I recently discovered this app while looking for an offline translator and something to expand my vocabulary in either language. Let me tell you, it has a VERY nicely done design and aesthetic. Not only that, but it has quick games and quizzes that are incredibly helpful if your vocabulary quantity is lacking in either language (though it is mainly targeting English learners who speak Spanish I believe). Its games are quick and challenging, and I'm pretty sure it all works offline as well.

    Here's the Google Play download link:

     https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.nglish.spanish.english.translator&hl=es_419


  7. I think I might have an interesting take on this, since my third language and current focus is American Sign Language. It's very common to get your start in sign language through music. To this day, there's nothing more fun for me than signing along to a song as it plays, or watching someone else, on YouTube usually, sign to or teach how to sign a song. You get extremely expressive, learn new words, and really have fun doing it. Music is always a great tool to use when learning languages. Even babies and toddlers participate in this; it's probably part of the reason they learn so much quicker than we, as adults, do!


  8. Finding time throughout the day can be tricky; try starting out by putting some time away as soon as you wake up, and right before you go to bed. Other than that, if you try and become more aware of what you're doing and how, you'll find you have more time than ever. Try putting on a podcast, audiobook, radio or TV show in that language while you're doing chores or other tasks that need to be done but aren't extremely important. Use the time you have to do both learn and take care of your to-do list.


  9. It's not essential, but it would help tremendously. If you have nothing to lose and the means, then go for it! I learned more Spanish in three months of living in Venezuela than I would have in three years just studying it. Of course, mostly no one has the means to do this, and like I said, it's not required. It doesn't even work for everybody, but it often helps. BEWARE of culture shock however!


  10. Media. YouTube is a personal favorite of mine, but things such as television, movies (dubbed or with captions!), books, news, articles, podcasts, games. I've always said it's the best you can do when learning a new language to surround yourself with it. Everything you use on a daily basis is probably quite easy to use as learning technique. I also pair this with translation as a handy hobby - translate in your head or even on paper as you go along!


  11. I think I might have an interesting take on this, since my third language and current focus is American Sign Language. It's very common to get your start in sign language through music. To this day, there's nothing more fun for me than signing along to a song as it plays, or watching someone else, on YouTube usually, sign to or teach how to sign a song. You get extremely expressive, learn new words, and really have fun doing it. Music is always a great tool to use when learning languages. Even babies and toddlers participate in this; it's probably part of the reason they learn so much quicker than we, as adults, do!

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