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Linguaholic

Judhie

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  1. Whoa, thank you so much for sharing about this application here. This is the first time I discovered one and I think I can really use a lot of this. I've been reading about it on the link that you shared and it seems it doesn't just offers lessons but various exercises as well to help us improve our skills! That's really something. I'm so excited to give this one a try. I hope that even if I just get the free version for now a lot of resources will still be available for me. Not sure what I'd do with their colorful images though because it's the lessons that I'm after. Anyway, thanks again for
  2. I mean there are many other websites that are offering this right? And I'm not sure how many people actually enrolls themselves to one of these tutorial sessions but with all the English language resources already available online, do you think online tutorials will still be of big help? I'm thinking of enrolling to one to further improve my English language but I seem to feel the youtube lessons to be okay ha ha! I know, there are many free tutorial videos in youtube and I really love watching them. I don't know about improvement yet but do you think online tutorials can be good for us? Or ar
  3. Ha ha I was thinking the same thing before between idioms and metaphors and asked about it with my English teacher. The main thing to remember is that, correct me if I'm wrong with this, when you are using a metaphor, you are comparing two things. And I believe you do it without using the words "like" or "as". I'm gonna think of some examples, right now I really can't think of any good ones. As for idioms, it is how it's been defined. An idiom or idiom phrase is something that means something different than the words used for it. Maybe like the phrase "you are an eyesore" or something like tha
  4. I think it's because of the different sentence structures from different languages. Specially those words that doesn't have a direct translation but is just being described into works when translated to other languages. So the software translator gets confused and choose to just continue the entire translation even if it already has a wrong grammar. Whenever I need to translate some languages and wanted them to be accurate, I try to just translate the entire paragraph via sentence to sentence or sometimes even word by word. That way I get to see whenever the phrases still makes sense or not.
  5. How do you guys diagram sentences with more than one phrase? And I don't mean to say the ones that only has prepositions, I can still handle that. But it confuses me when I'm diagramming sentences that has two ore more complete phrases that are separated with commas. They still have the usual S TV DO patterns but there's 2 or more of that. Whenever I encounter that in exams I can't help but be confused about them. Are you having the same problem too? What's the usual technique that you do to diagram those kinds of sentences? I always try to look at the patterns and start the diagram from there
  6. Awesome! I just read the entire list and I'm really glad I did. To be honest, I don't think all of them can be effective for me but I'm sure it will work out for others. For now, the most effective way that helped me that's included in your list is watching English shows and reading books and magazines. It's always the best because I can really remember the words and phrases there that I can use in conversations and apply in my English exams.
  7. Yeah English is tricky even for native american sometimes. The second idiom phrase you shared is easy to understand because anyone can get the idea right away about bats not being able to see at night. So you can associate that with the action that someone has done. And there are many other idioms to talk about. Some aren't being used frequently will be mentioned to you all of a sudden specially at a job interview which can be very annoying. For example, "case in point". Easy enough to get what it means right? But how about "wet behind ears" or "on a power trip" and it starts to swirl my mind
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