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pinkdrizzly

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About pinkdrizzly

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    Language Newbie
  1. It may happen more in typing, but I am in college and I see it a lot. Many people just use your for both a possessive situation and a descriptive situation. They don't even realize there's a difference. I think it's common within my age group, for some reason. It's really grating.
  2. Of course! I think English is the simplest language for me, so I don't have to think so much when I speak it. It's my native tongue. It may have flaws, but I don't believe any one language is without flaw.
  3. Do you get your and you're confused? I personally think that it's pretty easy to remember which one to use, but I see it incorrectly used a lot. Mostly by people my own age. You're is there for you are. I think the apostrophe makes it easy to remember, but not everyone agrees. Do you have trouble with this or have you got it down pat?
  4. I never understand that, either. It makes me think, "is it really fresh or are they just calling it fresh?" There is a restaurant here that has a sign that says New "Fresh" Baked Buns! Makes me wonder what it was before.
  5. Tips for choosing a good translation of a novel should be the same for any language, if I am honest. You should just research the different versions of it. Look at ones that have many reviews, preferably highly rated reviews. There should be some that are pretty popular and they're usually popular for a reason. It should be translated by someone or a company that knows the material well. If the blogs and reviews go crazy for the version, it's probably a good sign for it.
  6. Very true on all points. If a school can only afford a few languages, then Spanish should definitely be one. It's especially useful in my area because we have a very high Spanish population. That class would fill quickly, too. French was the only one that always had an opening.
  7. I saw where someone said they learn some Japanese from anime and that they disliked the dubbed versions of the shows. They preferred the subtitled versions with the original Japanese left in. I find this to be really true and helpful in learning any language, to be honest. I try to avoid English dubbed movies or shows at all costs because things get lost in the translation and it really is just not the same. I also learn so much about emoting and enunciating in the language when I can hear it being said, while reading the translation at the same time. Are you the same? Do you like to watch things that are subtitled or do you want something that is dubbed over?
  8. The high school in my hometown starting offering a German class the first year after I graduated. It has gone on to become one of the most popular electives in the school and people scramble to get into it first. I do believe the teacher is really amazing and he makes it fun to learn the language, but the class itself is just spectacular. The schools in my current city now do not offer German as a language and it got my wondering, do you think it should be offered as an elective? Is it as commonplace as Spanish or French? Would you have taken a German class if you were a high school student?
  9. My name is Meg. I have taken 4 years of French and during my life have attempted to teach myself Russian and Japanese at different points in my life. I hope to get back into my French because I do love it. I got honors in my classes, but was a little shy. So, therefore I am making myself speak the language a lot more. One day, I will go to France and not feel like I don't know what is going on, right? So, hi! :kiss:
  10. I used many of the resources at About.com when I was in my French classes. I thought they were very helpful. I have never tried BBC. What do you like better about their videos? My teacher actually recommended about.com, among a few other sites, to us, so that is what I have stuck with. I really find their proficiency tests are very nice.
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