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justinp

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About justinp

  • Rank
    Language Newbie

Converted

  • Currently studying
    Spanish, German
  • Native tongue
    English
  • Fluent in
    English, Spanish (semi-fluent)
  1. When I was in third grade they taught us cursive. I have never had to use it again since then, except to read other people's writing and to sign documents. I really don't think there is much of a point in learning cursive, because it isn't used much anymore. I know a lot of historical documents were written in cursive, but textbooks will include a typewritten version of them. I've always thought that cursive varies too much and is too sloppy to be used much outside of personal notetaking.
  2. I imagine that they would both have their downsides and benefits. I've never taken a one-on-one class before, but I have taken group classes. In a one-on-one class, you would be able to go at your own pace, whereas in a group class you have to either linger with the students who don't learn as fast as you or you end up left behind because the class needs to move on. With a group class, you can work together to help each other learn and study, which isn't something you can do with a one-on-one course. I feel like the best way to do it would be to have a group class but also have a lot of one-on-one time with your instructor.
  3. Haha, it looks like we have opposite views! I wonder why it is that some people prefer certain languages over others.
  4. No, actually the beta version is already available! I looked through it a little bit about a week ago, and I have access to the Dutch lessons. I don't plan on taking Dutch though, so I'm planning on doing more German instead.
  5. I have a lot of problems with grammar and conjugation. I'm really good at memorizing and using vocabulary, I'm good at reading, but I just have a really hard time trying to figure out what order the words should go in or how to conjugate them.
  6. I've been wondering for a while about spanish language internet slang, and the ways in which spanish speaking people shorten their writing. I only know a few examples a10 = adios +o- = mas o menos b7s = besitos mxo = mucho m1ml = mándame un mensaje luego Does anyone know any others?
  7. My favorite language to hear has always been German. I was really into German music when I was in middle school, especially the band Oomph! I love how German speakers can be so hard and so soft with their language, and can sometimes seem to speak harshly and softly at the same time. I also really like Spanish, but that might just be because I have worked with it for so long (I took four years of Spanish in high school, two of which were at college level). This is an unpopular opinion, but I really don't like the French language. It always seems to be everyone's favorite, but it just sounds like they need to blow their nose. I also have a hard time differentiating between words, as many French syllables seem to sound nearly exactly the same. But that's probably just me. I really wish that I liked French, because there are so many great films and books written in French but I just don't.
  8. I guess I don't listen to that much latin music. I used to listen to a lot of Ricky Martin, but I haven't listened to him in a long time. I'm definitely going to have to check out the music you guys have recommended. Here is a good spanish language song by Ricky Martin, by the way. Lo Mejor De Mi Vida Eres Tú
  9. It really depends on the article you are translating. Some of the articles they have on there are very difficult, but others are very simple, and don't take too much skill. On the right hand side, there should be a section of options that says "Difficulty" with a list saying "Easier," "Medium," and "Harder," make sure to only have "Easier" checked off. Another suggestion, if you are know the translation to a sentence but you aren't sure about one or two words of it, is to click on the sentence and on the right it should say "Duobot translation." This translation isn't completely accurate, but it should give you an idea of what is trying to be said. I was going to write this in my original reply to this topic but I forgot; one thing you can do in the immersion section is to vote on whether or not a translation looks right. This can help your reading ability.
  10. I'm a big fan of cult films (and LGBT films) and I've heard a lot of great things about the spanish film director Pedro Almódovar, but I don't know where to start with his films--He has made so many, and they all sound really good! My boyfriend has just about every film he has made, but I wasn't sure if I should start watching them starting with his first film, or if there was a fan favorite that people seem to like the best. I also wanted to watch his films because I thought that they may help my understanding of the spanish language. I took four years of spanish in high school, but it has always been difficult for me to understand what native speakers of the language are saying. I've heard good things about La Mala Educación, Mujeres al borde de un ataque de nervios, and Laberinto de Pasiones, but I wanted to know what you guys think. So, what do you recommend? Is there an order that I should watch them in? Are there any fan favorites? What are your favorites? Thank you.
  11. I can read spanish fairly well, and my spoken spanish is ok, but in the future, when I am more fluent than I am now, I plan on going to mexico and spain for vacation. It will be nice to be able to talk in spanish there. I also think that it will be a fantastic asset in my career. I am studying to become a funeral director, and it will be nice to be able to communicate with people who need to organize their families funerals. There are a lot of people in my area who only speak spanish and do not speak english, and they need help too. I imagine it must be very difficult for people to go through such a tough time and not even be able to effectively communicate with the people who are organizing the funeral Another thing is that my boyfriend used to be a spanish teacher, but that was decades ago. I want to be better than him at spanish, just so I can rub it in his face. It will also be useful to be able to speak to each other in spanish so that other people don't know what we are saying.
  12. There are times when it is ok to use google translate, but you should not use it for translating full sentences; it will not give an accurate translation. I use it if I am totally clueless as to what a sentence could mean, and it will give me context clues to try to figure out the sentence myself. Google translate can be used to translate individual words, or to make the meanings of words more clear, but keep in mind that it might not be completely accurate, or that it might give you a word that is only related to it's translation. Google translate is also very bad at grammar. You need to know the grammar conventions of the language you are learning well before you attempt to use google translate to understand sentences in foreign languages. It is also important to keep in mind that idioms do not translate well without context.
  13. I've been using duolingo for a while too, and what I find helps the most is to do the "Strengthen Skills" exercises much more often than learning new skills. I also recommend using the immersion feature as much as you can, depending on your skill level. The act of translating text from the language you are learning into your native language is very helpful in making those words stick with you, because you are using them in a meaningful way outside of the random phrases that duolingo gives to you. I would also suggest that if you make a list of words that you have difficulties remembering, and make flashcards out of them. If you prefer to do them online, there are plenty of online flashcard websites, and I'm a fan of quizlet. Good luck!
  14. I haven't read much, but I have read a Spanish translation of Flat Stanley by Jeff Brown for an assignment in my fourth year of spanish class. I've also read a book of legends from latin America. I have a book of legends from Spain, but I haven't read it yet. I actually forgot I still had it! There have been a few books that I want to read in spanish but I haven't gotten my hands on them yet. I want to read Plata Quemada but it seems to be out of print. I also want to read La Virgen de Los Sicarios, which is on Amazon for only eight dollars, so I should probably buy that soon!
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