Jump to content
Linguaholic

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'ancient post'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Linguaholic.com | Language Forum |
    • Language Learning
    • Language Study Apps
    • Translations (Theory & Practice)
    • Language Teaching
    • Online Language Learning Resources
    • Language Exchange Corner
    • Promote your Website/App/Game/Video
    • New Forum Members
    • Forum Suggestions / Requests
    • Forum News / Announcements
    • Sinologie Forum
  • English Language Learning Forum
    • English Language Learning
  • Chinese Language Learning Forum
    • Chinese Language Learning
  • German Language Learning Forum
    • German Language Learning
  • Spanish Language Learning Forum
    • Spanish Language Learning
  • Japanese Language Learning Forum
    • Japanese Language Learning
  • French Language Learning Forum
    • French Language Learning
  • More Languages
    • Study Other Languages
  • Conlang Language Learning Forum
    • Conlang Language Learning

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Facebook Profile


Currently studying


Native tongue


Fluent in

Found 4 results

  1. Hey guys! I'm a girl who is really interested in languages and have been since I was 16. One of the first new languages I came in contact with when I started to get interested in new languages was Esperanto. Back then I thought Esperanto would become a widely spoken language, to the point of becoming an international one! I read all about its history, I thought this language was full of a great potential, but sadly it seems it fell short. This makes me wonder... why isn't esperanto so popular? This language was created to be used as an international language, that's why is so easy to lear
  2. This may sound like a joke post, but it really isn't. I am not a Star Trek fan, but my fiancé and his mother are huge Trekkers. I was wondering if (even though it was developed for a television show) Klingon is actually considered a language. It has a syntax, vocabulary, and is associated with a specific culture (because Star Trek fans take their fandom seriously).
  3. Various languages have been artificially created, such as Esperanto or Klingon. Some of these (Esperanto, Bolak, etc.) have been academic attempts to create an universal language. Others (Klingon, Vulcan, Lapine, Nadsat) have been constructed to use in fiction. Have any of you ever studied any of these? Elvish (to go with Tolkien) seems to be particularly popular. I suppose Elvish poetry could be fun, I'll have to see if my feeble old mind can handle it. Seems to me that a serious linguist would have fun with some of these.
  4. So there are a couple of well developed fictional languages out there, I think the two most famous ones would be Klingon from Star Trek and the Elvish langue from Lord of the Rings. I'm personally quite a big Star Trek fan and a keen linguist so I tried my hand at Klingon but I found it rather difficult to learn. Marc Orkrand the man that created the language specifically said that he wanted to create a unique language so he took the most difficult rules from all kinds of languages and mashed them together. The language is definitely speakable, I know a lady that likes to translate poems into
×
×
  • Create New...