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andella

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About andella

  • Rank
    Language Newbie

Converted

  • Currently studying
    German, French
  • Native tongue
    English
  • Fluent in
    English

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  1. I would like to learn how to speak German and French. I am wondering, would it be better to learn one language at a time or to begin with both languages? Has anyone here learned two or more languages at the same time. What was your experience? Would you recommend that I attempt to do this?
  2. I am getting ready to learn French. Did you find any similarities between the two languages? I did a little research and was a bit overwhelmed at how many differences there are compared to similarities. I am wondering, if all these differences are going to throw me off, or is there some familiar ground between English and French?
  3. Oh, how lucky you are to speak all the languages you do already. I wish I was at your same level! So, I can not offer advice out out experience, but only personal. My mother-in-laws family spoke Czech, so my vote goes for that, but seriously, whatever you choose, you will be the wiser, learning, yet, another language! I am just wondering, if it is similar, wouldn't it make it a little easier to learn, not harder?
  4. My paternal lines are of German descent. This part of my family emigrated to the upper portion of the United States in the late 19th century. I had the opportunity to spend a year in Germany, years ago. Although I enjoyed myself, my grasp on the German language limited my experience. Next time, I plan to immerse myself more into the cultural environment. The only way to achieve this is to speak the native language of the country.
  5. I am, also, new and enjoyed your list very much! My favorite has to be Schnee von Gestern. I think this is a witty, useful phrase to begin my journey into speaking German! Even though I spent a year in Germany (many years ago), my ability was limited to the basics of hello, goodbye, thank you, sorry I do not speak German, do you speak English? The next time I visit, it would be nice to interact on a more personal level! Throwing in a couple of these idioms would be fun! Perhaps, as a bilingual speaker, you could provide some insight into my post within the General German Discussion section under the title, "Do bilingual German speakers see the world differently?". Nice to "meet" you!
  6. A new study released by Panos Athanasopoulos, a psycholinguist (someone who studies the fields of psychology, cognitive science, and linguistics) suggests there is a difference between the way a German speaker perceives the world compared to an English speaker. Athanasopoulos believes this cognitive difference boils down to how German speakers view and describe events in contrast to English speakers. Actually, he takes his research a step further, with the question, ‘Can two different minds exist within one person?’ ” in relation to a bilingual speaker. He is not merely referring to grammatical vocabulary, so much as, an actual difference in perspectives. Results of his research conclude German speakers are more likely to focus on possible outcomes of people’s actions, whereas, English speakers pay more attention to the action itself. Implying an advantage of being a bilingual speaker (in this case German) is the ability to have alternate visions of the world. I am curious to hear back from German/English (and others) speakers about your viewpoint on this subject. I am not sure, if this study is conclusive evidence; although, there is a certain amount of substance to his theory about the advantages of being a bilingual speaker.
  7. I agree with all the posts in this thread. I would like to add my insight gained from reading this interesting article about the difference between reading (receptive) and speaking (productive) when learning a new language. To fully comprehend this subject, I appreciated how the author separated the attributes of listening (receptive) and writing (productive). To break this down in a more clear format, a chart was included in the explanation. Speaking and listening falls under the auditory function of our brain; whereas, writing and reading is a written (visual) function. Furthermore, writing and speaking is a active form of learning a new language. In contrast, to reading and listening being a passive form of communication. The ability for the cognitive parts of our brain to recall (in order to speak a new language) vs recognize words (read) is easier for some people. In addition, like you and others pointed out, it all boils down to practice and confidence. I hope, as I embark on my new journey in learning other languages, to not fall into the trap of feeling overwhelmed and give up too easily!
  8. Hi, I think, it is great you want to learn sign language. Both of my in-laws (now deceased) lost their hearing at a young age, due to an illness. Coincidentally, I was taking a sign language class, when I met my husband. I think it was destiny! I wonder, what do you mean by, "It is another forum of word communication. I know you can't put sign language into words since it is Braille"? As, lushlala, pointed out sign language is not a universal language; nevertheless, it has universal features. For example, when my mother-in-law traveled over to Europe from the United States, it was amazing how many people she met that spoke sign language. She had no difficulty communicating with all of them! Nice to "meet" you!
  9. Hello, I am happy to join this forum on language! My native tongue is English. I am, also, able to communicate with sign language. I would like to learn German and French. Of course, other languages interest me, too. As my signature line reads, from the words of Roger Bacon, "Knowledge of languages is the doorway to wisdom", and I believe this to be true! P.S. I adore the little smiley icons available on this forum! P.S.S. Happily married with two children.
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