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Mabuti Po or Mabuti Ko?


OddVisions

When Learning a new Language, do you use traditional methods (i.e: writing on paper?)  

12 members have voted

  1. 1. When Learning a new Language, do you use traditional methods (i.e: writing on paper?)

    • Yes, Everyday
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    • Most of the time
      4
    • Occasionally
      2
    • Never
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I can't remember if asking something whether their alright is mabuti po or mabuti ko. I'm relatively sure both mean something. I think one is asking for a person, while the other is asking how a person is feeling. I'm not entirely sure which is which at the moment, or if I'm even remotely right about one or the other. I think it's mabuti po though.

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I can't remember if asking something whether their alright is mabuti po or mabuti ko. I'm relatively sure both mean something. I think one is asking for a person, while the other is asking how a person is feeling. I'm not entirely sure which is which at the moment, or if I'm even remotely right about one or the other. I think it's mabuti po though.

I am a Filipino, so I know this.

When you are asking a person how he is, the answer is "Mabuti po." "Po" is a particle used to denote politeness. It is a response to a greeting of "How are you?" I have not encountered "Mabuti ko." Instead, I know "Mabuti po ako," which is a longer version of "Mabuti po." "Ako" means "I," so by replying "Mabuti po ako," it means "I am fine/ I am good," and "Mabuti po" also has the same meaning.

If you ask a person if he is all right, the answer to that (in formal speech) is "Ayos lang po ako" or "Ayos lang po." "Ayos" means order (such as an to make a room in order) or "to be all right," but in this context, it means "to be all right." "Lang" is like a particle that is almost equivalent to "just." So the whole sentence of answering to "Are you all right" would sound like "I am just fine/ okay/ all right." Sometimes, Filipinos have this mentality of hiding feelings, which is why the "just" part is included in speech because we usually don't want the other person to worry too much about us.

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