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Fegg

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Fegg last won the day on October 21 2015

Fegg had the most liked content!

About Fegg

  • Rank
    Language Newbie

Converted

  • Currently studying
    German
  • Native tongue
    Spanish
  • Fluent in
    English, Catalan
  1. Homonymous are words that are written the same but mean different things. Paronimous sound very similar but mean different things. Do you know any homonymous/paronimous? I´ll let here a classic: Ay (expression) --> Hay (verb) --> Ahí (adverb) Another: Azar (noun)= Fate --> Azahar (noun)= Orange blossom Anyone can guess this next homonymous? Cojo/Cojo
  2. ¿te gusta tocar con tus gatos? ¿música? o ¿tocar a los gatos?:P
  3. Write a word that you know in Spanish

    Tikismikis, with the accent on the "mi"
  4. Teaching in English?

    Thanks so much for the answers:) I will share it when it is actually published, I´m still recording.
  5. Song from Desperado

    I never heard it or used it, but "jinete" is a rider and actually exists as a verb as I could find in the RAE here: 1. tr. Am. Domar caballos cerriles. 2. tr. Arg., Bol., Nic., Pan., Par. y Ur. Dicho de un jinete: Montar potros luciendohabilidad y destreza. 3. tr. Méx. Tardar en pagar un dinero con el fin de sacar ganancias. 4. intr. Andar a caballo, principalmente por los sitios públicos, alardeando de gala yprimor. U. t. c. tr. 5. intr. Cuba. Realizar negocios ilícitos con extranjeros con el fin de obtenerdivisas. 6. intr. Cuba. Dicho de una mujer: Ejercer la prostitución con clientes extranjeros. 7. prnl. Col. Montarse y asegurarse en la silla. By the context in the song it must be the translation I gave you (you can even go further and say he is kind of showing off while riding), but it has another figurative meanings depending on the country and context, some completely different.
  6. Hmmm didn´t show everything, I was wondering how do you deal with it yourself? I think in the Netherlands they speak more English than in here, that´s not good for learning:(
  7. Basically I allow myself to acquire it as naturally as I’m able to. Yes, I try to understand all grammar, that is basic because we need to find rules and patterns, but if Dutch is similar to German you know that for us, these languages imply also to think very different while talking, and that, I’ m afraid will take years. Understanding a text sometimes feels like doing a puzzle, sounds familiar?:) …ok, this verb belongs to this sentence…mmm and 20 words later, ops, wait a moment, it is actually saying the opposite since there is a negation…but wait, is she who likes him or he who likes her, and after 3 pronouns altogether one after the other where you don’t know who is who and for whom and because of what, oh oh, wait, there is a lost particle here, two letters that don’t mean anything…let’s see in the dictionary…mmm nothing, what is thatttttt??? and just before you are about to give up….oh! wait, that actually belongs to the verb 35 words before that changes completely the meaning of the whole piece!! This is what it looks sometimes German to me, an indecipherable code with morphologic rules that seem to have been thought just to make us go mad. But all jokes aside, somehow I got to like this language more and more, it feels like kind of an architectural piece of art, I can imagine that someone who masters it, can express himself with such an accuracy and variety. I´m going 3 hours per day to German language lectures, play local radio one hour most of the days, even if I don´t get much, as a background helps my year. Also, force myself to deal with doctors and elemental burocracy (next step, dealing it on the phone:)) Make visual / coloured notes with gender of nouns. Talk often with someone that doesn´t know English and has the patience to adjust his speech to you, you learn so much from those key people. I also help here and there friends that have a lower level of German than I do, helps a lot too. But, just like you, shame on us that we do not practice with our partners...I mean language:))
  8. Sounds nice though:)) I´m still A2 because I had a daughter soon after arriving here and the first year I couldn´t do much more but to take care of her. And yes, it is hard and the worst part for me is precisely that crazy sentence order they make with verbs at the end and so on, I didn´t know Dutch was the same, but it makes sense somehow. My fault is that I speak with my husband in English and not in German, but we can´t help it. Does it happen the same to you, or you speak Dutch with him?
  9. Something special about my language, and that I specially noticed once I got in touch with other languages is that we, in Spain, make too much use of swearing words. It is a pity and really shameful. Also found differences between Latin-American Spanish and European one. I have to admit that I was amazed how they tend to use much broader range of vocabulary in countries like Mexico than in my motherland, like they have much more respect and love for their own language than we Spaniards do, generally speaking.
  10. Oh là là Trellum, guess what... love basically, my husband is German. I´m from Barcelona, but still (except the weather), I like it here. And you in the Netherlands? I´ve heard some Dutch on tv and looks sooo hard! Actually I bring my keyword here also because I don´t get used to the fact Germans have 2 letters switched (the z in the place of the w, it says qzerty actually) and I´m used to type fast and without looking.
  11. Hello, I have been using Spanish to teach this language in the past and used English here and there to explain some tricky grammar parts or translate some words, but now, I´m starting to record some online videos for youtube where I start from beginner's level and I´ve been doing it in English to explain at least some basic grammar. The problem is that even though I´m fluent in English, I know it is not exactly perfect, still make some minor mistakes and my accent sounds to me soooo bad that I´m considering switching to Spanish or having my friend speaking those lessons for me. Still, I´ve never had a problem to be understood. I was wondering what do you think, does it feel not very professional for a native Spanish teacher using English if it is not completely perfect? These videos are completely free, I really enjoy teaching for the sake of it, but still, don´t like to give a low professional image. Another solution is to subtitled them, but I was thinking about that just for higher levels, I really believe in the value of being taught in the same language you are learning.
  12. Hola Enrico, encantada de conocerte. Pero cuando lo dices tú, que eres hombre, es "encantado de conocerte":)
  13. Which is more correct?

    The first one is correct too. The difference is that you are emphasizing that is YOU who touches or not the turtle and not for example the kid that is close to you. We do this a lot in Spanish; sometimes we "double" the pronouns only to emphasize that is YOU, or ME and no one else. "Dame eso a mí" versus "Dame eso" or "Dámelo" to remark: give it to me and not to someone else. ¿Dónde vas a ir tú? --> Normally is ¿Dónde vas a ir? because the subject is already referred with the ending of the verb (vas--> 2nd person of singular). In the first case we add "tú" to remark about YOUR option and not mine. "Dónde vas a ir tú? Porque yo me vuelvo a casa." --> Where are YOU going? Because I´m going home. Even in English I heard people doing this emphasis by raising their voice when saying "you". On the other side, if there is no emphasis intended, that kind of structure sounds very typical from non-native speakers(sounds no natural) whose mother language need always the use of the subject pronoun.
  14. Our lovely "ñ", I live in Germany and I need to bring the Spanish keyword with me. Even though it is not my language, I will comment something special about German. The order in which Germans say numbers let us foreigners with this face :/ when trying to find out how much did the supermarket cashier told us to pay:)
  15. Song from Desperado

    It means something like "Riding my horse"