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Hi everyone,

I want to introduce an iOS app which is very useful for learning Japanese, especially Japanese's accent and pronunciation. The app' data is referenced from famous Japanese's websites so that it is completely reliable. Below are the app description and download link, please take a look at this.

JAccent is an offline Japanese accent dictionary for Japanese teachers and learners.
You can search for the Tokyo dialect accent, and you can also search for kanji's meaning.
Also, you can easily find opposite words, Japanese counter suffix, Japanese surname and so on.
Absolutely, you can use it daily for checking the meaning of the word.

※ Features:
・Over 45,500 accents
・Over 5000 opposite words
・Over 12,000 kanji's meaning, Onyomi, Kunyomi, writing etc.
・Adjectives and verbs' forms
・Japanese counter suffix, Japanese surname, Japanese place name, overseas place name
・Audio listening
・Kanji's handwriting recognition
・Internet is not necessary (Except audio listening)

※ Coming soon features:
・Words and Accents' contribution
・Accents' quizzes

※ App's data referenced the following page:

- http://accent.u-biq.org/
- http://www.gavo.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp/ojad/
- http://kanjivg.tagaini.net/

 

※ Download link on AppStore:

https://itunes.apple.com/jp/app/id1252200087?mt=8

Screenshot_ja1.jpg

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