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Question on the word Overview


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Dear all

Up to now I have always seen the word "Overview" used as a noun. However, recently I have come across the word "Overview" used as a verb:

Exercises a full overview .... over something!

I just wanted to be sure if in this case the word "Overview" translates to Full supervision, or maybe something else!

Please if somebody can elaborate.

Thank you, beforehand

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"Overview" is never a verb.
The verb in that sentence is "exercises".
You can simply add "he" or "she" before "exercises" to see it.
Although unless the sentence was used at a gym or something, it does seem pretty weird to me.

Overview is usually meant to mean something like a summary, or a bunch of stuff which you can see everything in 1 sight (example: table of contents found at the beginning of most books, or at the top of long Wikipedia articles).

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31 minutes ago, 宇崎ちゃん said:

"Overview" is never a verb.
The verb in that sentence is "exercises".
You can simply add "he" or "she" before "exercises" to see it.
Although unless the sentence was used at a gym or something, it does seem pretty weird to me.

Overview is usually meant to mean something like a summary, or a bunch of stuff which you can see everything in 1 sight (example: table of contents found at the beginning of most books, or at the top of long Wikipedia articles).

Thank you for replying, and I do agree with you

However, in this Agreement for establishment of a "certain" Association the use of the word "Full Overview" is odd! Or maybe, it was used as what they call a "constructive ambiguity" in Politics! In the context of sentences below I see the word "Overview" as a verb, as it denotes an action (the association is exercising an "action" in...). Please, see sentences below:

In accordance with the First Agreement, the Association/Community will have as its main objectives in delivering public functions and services to: a) exercise full overview to develop local economy; c)exercise full overview in the area of education; d)exercise full overview to improve local primary and secondary health and social care; e)exercise full overview to coordinate urban and rural planning;

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Ah, legal language!
Still, "exercise" is the verb, not "overview".
In the case, "exercise" is used to write an as detailed report as possible...I assume.
Legal language is always vague on purpose so that the slave regular citizen doesn't notice any of the double standards their masters the politicians always tend to employ.

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7 minutes ago, 宇崎ちゃん said:

Ah, legal language!
Still, "exercise" is the verb, not "overview".
In the case, "exercise" is used to write an as detailed report as possible...I assume.
Legal language is always vague on purpose so that the slave regular citizen doesn't notice any of the double standards their masters the politicians always tend to employ.

I could not agree with you more

Yet, "exercise full overview" in my opinion translates to "Exercise full supervision", and supervision can be used as a verb or as a noun. I have been working as a professional interpreter/translator for more than 20 years and for god of me I would not be able to translate it differently than "Exercise full supervision".

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1 hour ago, kastriot said:

I could not agree with you more

Yet, "exercise full overview" in my opinion translates to "Exercise full supervision", and supervision can be used as a verb or as a noun. I have been working as a professional interpreter/translator for more than 20 years and for god of me I would not be able to translate it differently than "Exercise full supervision".

That's indeed the best way to describe it, yes.
There is indeed a verb "to supervise", but that doesn't mean that any word that replaces "supervision" automatically makes it a verb.

Consider for example "to eat dinner" and "to eat fruit".
"Dinner" can become a verb "to dine", but "fruit" can never become a verb, and maybe you have fruit for dinner.

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13 minutes ago, 宇崎ちゃん said:

That's indeed the best way to describe it, yes.
There is indeed a verb "to supervise", but that doesn't mean that any word that replaces "supervision" automatically makes it a verb.

Consider for example "to eat dinner" and "to eat fruit".
"Dinner" can become a verb "to dine", but "fruit" can never become a verb, and maybe you have fruit for dinner.

Thanks

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