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Daimashin

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About Daimashin

  • Rank
    Wordsmith
  • Birthday 09/29/1984

Converted

  • Native tongue
    Cantonese
  • Fluent in
    English, Chinese

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  1. Not much can be said other than to practice, practice, and practice. Watch and listen more to how native speakers talk and repeat the words until it comes close. I know this sounds silly but Sesame Street is a great show to learn.
  2. I think it depends on the person learning it. I have a couple of friends that are absolutely horrible at the language even though they have studied English all their life. However, they are amazing at Chinese while I struggled with it back at school. Some people are just better at learning one language than others.
  3. I was under the impression all along that sign language is universal but seems not like it. Glad I asked otherwise I wouldn't have known about this. Seems like really inconvenient.
  4. I'm wondering if sign language is universal. Is it like spoken language where different ethnics use different versions of the sign language? Or everywhere around the world uses only one form of sign language?
  5. Maybe Maths for me but never the languages that I've learned. It's been a few years since I've written anything in Malay but on the other day, I was required to do a translation from English to Malay and I had no problem at all. I think learning a language is like riding a bicycle, once you know it you won't forget it. Even if I get rusty, all I need is to read up on it again.
  6. I recommend in the morning because just like everything else. Morning is the time of day when you feel the freshest and most awake. In the evening is when all your energies are used up during the day and lose focus.
  7. I don't think it has to do with DNA or anything. Personally, I think that it just needs a lot of practice. My sister had the same problem last time. She couldn't roll Rs too but she was persistent with practicing and she worked it out. Maybe hers was a special case but doubtful.
  8. Actually out of my entire life, this only happened once. My sister wanted to test my Mandarin skills and asked me to translate while watching a Taiwanese drama. Of course, I had no problem and managed but I do understand the feeling. It's annoying as though I'm really incompetent.
  9. The first thing that is taught is not a sentence but we are taught words. We start with A which is "awak" which means "you". From there we learn to build sentences from that word.
  10. If you're taking a language course right now, I want ask how much are you paying for the fees? Is it on monthly basis or a lump sum payment? Anyone that has taken a language course before are welcomed to reply too.
  11. Not currently but I used to have a couple of friends that spoke the Malay language even before I started learning it. Very handy because they helped me in a lot of aspects like grammar, sentence building, and pronunciations. I'm starting to do the same thing myself for a friend that is learning Chinese now.
  12. In my country, English is not the first language and is considered a high class language. People here generally think that people that uses English as their native are showing off or arrogant. It's kind of frustrating that people still have this kind of thought.
  13. The first step to tutoring is always communication. From the verbal exchange, you can tell the level of her English. I'd suggest inquiring about her progress like what she has been working on for her test and her understanding of the test. Also take a look at her study material, e.g books, previous exam papers.
  14. Both have their pros and cons. One on one is good because it allows the tutor to focus on you only so any questions can be answered without interruptions. Bad thing is you'll be alone and after the class is over, you'll have no one to discuss with. Group study is more or less the opposite of one on one. Of course, there are more to them I'm only giving one example.
  15. What I did to improve my listening was to watch movies with subtitles on. While reading the subtitles I'll listen as it goes. I find that this way, other than learning to listen I can also improve on my pronunciation. When I'm comfortable, I stopped reading subtitles and straight up just listen to test how much I could catch.
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