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Do you prefer British English or American?


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@reverserewind
Note that American English is more likely to be used in the USA and maybe Canada only.
Any other English speaking country leans more towards British English, so it actually does make sense they teach you British English.

Of course it's even more important to have a basic understanding of the other variety too, lots of Americans seem not to be aware of British English to be a thing at all.
Because when I phone Nintendo of America, I obviously speak the British variety of English (though closer to Australian) and some of them have difficulties understanding me while I have no such problems while calling Nintendo of Europe (native speakers only, since the company is located in Germany) or Sony's UK headquarters.

On the other hand, the problem exists here in Europe too.
Last time I have been in Italy and Spain (I was in both this very summer), I had to force myself to lean more towards American English (which was difficult after using British/Australian English for so many years!) in order to be understood.

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Аmеriсаn Еnglish is simplifiеd Еnglish fоr thоsе whо саnnоt spеll. It's аs simplе аs thаt. I'vе hаd disсussiоns with Аmеriсаn tеасhеrs whо, whеn аskеd аbоut thе inсоrrесt usе оf z in wоrds suсh аs оrgаnisе аnd rеаlisе, sаy it's duе tо thе sоund. Whеn I аskеd thеm hоw thеy spеll sсhооls, misеr, lizаrds аnd оthеrs, thеy lаugh. Thе truth is thаt thе U.S. is pоpulаtеd with mаny diffеrеnt grоups оf immigrаnts. Thе ассеnt mаinly соmеs frоm thе Irish (think оf thаt r sоund). Rеgiоnаl ассеnts аlsо сhаngе prоnunсiаtiоn: vоwеls in pаrtiсulаr. Hоwеvеr, I digrеss. Spеlling аnd misspеllings саmе аbоut duе tо illitеrасy оf thе immigrаnts аnd thе еvеr-dеvеlоping еnglish lаnguаgе. I hаd а friеnd whо usеd tо sаy оf thе U.S. fоlk, "If thеy саn't kill yоu with а bullеt thеy'll kill yоu with а burgеr." I'd оnly аdd tо thаt, "If thеy саn't kill yоu, thеy'll kill yоur lаnguаgе." оnly kidding, оf соursе. I'vе gоt (thе Yаnks wоuld sаy "I hаvе") tоns (with аn s, nоt а z) оf U.S. mаtеs. I blаmе Miсrоsоft, аs I'm bеing wаrnеd thаt my pеrfесtly spеlt еnglish hаs mistаkеs.

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Personally, I prefer American English, Mid-Western has the cleanest 'accent' free-ish.  Accents are a matter of perspective but I understand American slang better.  If I listen to a group of British people talk in full English English, I don't have a clue what they're saying.

Like this.  So while some British speakers for movies and books can be very eloquent.  I don't think I would understand them in a normal conversation.  While British English is very charming, I enjoy the bluntness.  I might like Irish English though, it seems blunt and fun.  (He uses the n-word after 1:15.  If you it offends you please don't watch.)

Canadian English is very pretty though.  I watch a ton Youtubers from Canada and while they have an accent to me, it's not so foreign that I don't have a clue what they're saying. One thing that does bother me about British, Canadian, and Australian English is that they add extra letters to their words.  Like favorite becomes favourite has an extra u in it.  The subtitle difference in spelling I think is what ultimately affects how words are conveyed when speaking.  Though words like draught (British) and draft are completely different.  I personally just like the simplified American English because it seems to try to economize the spelling aspect of their words and how they speak.  

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Personally, I like both of them, for real. I really like the way that British English sounds, as you say, it's more sophisticated in some way, even more than the American one, but I feel way more comfortable when using an American accent since it's easier for me to flow as I speak. It is kind of a tricky thing to understand, but learning to speak with a British accent could be a good thing if you also have an American accent. The fact you can switch between languages makes it really cool, indeed.

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I appreciate both and while I like British accents I do dislike a few of their pronunciations and spellings as well as some of the word choices but that's mostly because I'm a lot more used to American English since that's what we were taught and that's what I'm most used to and additionally I watch a lot more American media. Even in books I don't think I've ever read one that had British spellings and writing style. 

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British English for me because that's the language I grew up with. However, when I communicate with Americans, I try to change my spelling to the American version, just so that I won't be the odd man out. Actually, I suspect that my American friends must have found my English a bit odd because of certain phrases I use and the structure of my sentences.

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American English is easier for me to understand, I do like the sound of British English more but I think there are areas where the accent is much thicker making it even harder to understand. What I love the most  though is Australian English, it sounds sexier and softer than British English in my opinion.  

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