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14 Other Ways to Say “It was a pleasure speaking with you”

14 Other Ways to Say “It was a pleasure speaking with you”

We say good things to people all the time. This keeps our relationships intact and intimate.

One of the things we say is “It was a pleasure speaking with you.”

This expression is used as a goodbye message to a person or group of people after spending time with them.

However, we sometimes feel like saying “It was a pleasure speaking with you” again and again could be a bit mechanical and dry.

So, in our post today, we list down different ways of expressing the same intent as with “It was a pleasure speaking with you.”

Most of these expressions can be found in both written and spoken discourse. At the end of this article, I will point out a couple of expressions that are mainly found in email correspondence. 

Here’s a quick list for you, including all the expressions and set phrases:

 

Alternatives to “It was a pleasure speaking with you”

 

  1. It was a pleasure talking to you
  2. It was a pleasure talking to you today
  3. It was nice talking to you
  4. It was great seeing you
  5. It was lovely seeing you
  6. It was good talking to you
  7. I enjoyed talking to you
  8. I had a lovely time with you
  9. I had a great time with you
  10. It was an honor to speak with you
  11. It was a privilege to meet you
  12. Nice catching up with you
  13. It was a privilege to meet you
  14. It was a pleasure talking to you yesterday/last week/this morning

 

The nitty-gritty of the expression “It was a pleasure speaking with you”

Parting messages are common in both written and spoken conversations. We make use of such kind of language to let the other person know that the discussion is over.

Apart from that, these positive parting messages also serve a deeper social purpose. These messages maintain peace and harmony in society.

The expression “It was a pleasure speaking with you” generally has a formal connotation. This means that it is also suitable in formalistic situations.

Example:

A: Thank you so much for coming today, Finn. It was a pleasure speaking with you.
 
B: I had a great time too, Ash. Thank you for setting this meeting up.

 
To digress a bit to sentence structure, the difference between “Speaking ‘with you’ and “Speaking ‘to you’” is subtle enough to be neglected.

However, if we are to make it more visible, the preposition “with” conveys more warmth than the preposition “to”; this nuance makes “speaking with you” the default choice.

Saying or writing this message to someone we have interacted with implies professionalism, respect, and cautiousness.

The message itself also signals the idea that the conversation or interaction went well or at least as planned and expected.

In a similar vein, we would also hear the relevant phrase “It has been a pleasure working with you” when one wants to express gratitude in work-related contexts.

To make “It was a pleasure speaking with you” more casual, we can conveniently replace it with either “Nice talking to you” or “Nice catching up with you.”

“It was a pleasure speaking with you” is just a slightly more formal version of “It was a pleasure talking to you,” but both essentially suggest the same meaning.

To respond to either “It was a pleasure talking to you” or “It was a pleasure speaking with you,” we often say “And you too” or “The pleasure is mine.”

Now that the basics have been laid out, it’s time to take a look at some of the most effective alternatives for “It was a pleasure speaking with you.”

 

Alternatives to “It was a pleasure speaking with you”

Having a bunch of alternative greetings at the back of our heads is a handy skill to have because it saves thinking time. In other words, it makes social interactions a lot easier.

Even responding to a question as common as “How’s your day?” can come off as a little discomforting if we don’t have enough responses in our word bank.

So, we have collected ambiguity-free ways of expressing the goodbye message “It was a pleasure speaking with you” to make conversations less awkward.

Here they are with example dialogues for contextualization:

 

1. It was a pleasure talking to you

If we want to show the person that we are excited to meet him or her, we would most likely use “Looking forward to talking to you” in speaking or writing.

With this idea in mind, it follows that “It was a pleasure talking to you” is something we say in contrast with “Looking forward to talking to you.”

We can use “It was a pleasure talking to you” after meeting or talking with another person. In language studies, expressions like this are what we refer to as leave-taking devices.

Moreover, the expression “It was a pleasure to talk to you” is an even more widely-used alternative for “It was a pleasure talking to you.”

However, “It was a pleasure talking to you” is meanwhile more popular than our expression today which is “It was a pleasure speaking with you.”

These usage differences go to show that using less formal alternatives to “It was a pleasure speaking with you” is generally harmless and acceptable.

Example:

A: Thank you for giving us this interview, Mr. Lee. It was a pleasure talking to you.
 
B: Thank you for having me here. I had a great time. 

 

2. It was a pleasure talking to you today

If we want to specify the time when we interacted with the person, we can also add adverbs of time like “today” at the end of our message.

Needless to say, “today” can be conveniently replaced by other time expressions like “this morning,” “this afternoon,” or “this evening,” depending on the conversational context.

Having said that, “It was a pleasure talking to you today,” “It was a pleasure talking to you this morning,” “It was a pleasure talking to you this afternoon,” and “It was a pleasure talking to you this evening” are all possible alternatives to use.

We can use “It was a pleasure talking to you today,” for example, after having a discussion over breakfast, lunch, or dinner with another person.

Example:

A: It was a pleasure talking to you today, Carl.
 
B: No. I should thank you for inviting me instead, Dan. Thank you very much.

 

3. It was nice talking to you

When the situation is even more casual, it also follows that we would want to wrap the conversation out in an informal manner too.

In this view, “It was nice talking to you” should be more suitable. We can make use of this expression after bumping into a friend in a public place and shortly talking with that person.

In situations like the one below, it would be inappropriate to use highly formal language because the relationship between the two people is quite close or intimate.

Example:

A: I still need to do the groceries, so I should get going. It was nice talking to you, Tom.
 
B: Pleasure having you in town again, Mrs. Murphy. See you around!

 

4. It was great seeing you

Meanwhile, we may also use “It was great seeing you” if we do not want to specify the act of “talking to” or “speaking with” the other person.

A more general and casual alternative than “It was a pleasure speaking with you,” “It was great seeing you” works well in close-knit relationships as well.

Example:

A: Hi, Remy. It was great seeing you this morning. Hope to catch up again soon!
 
B: Wish we had more time to talk earlier. We should have dinner or lunch sometime.

 

5. It was lovely seeing you

If we want to convey more warmth to our message receiver, the expression “It was lovely seeing you” should do the job pretty well.

Although this one practically conveys the same meaning as “It was great seeing you,” “It was lovely seeing you” definitely conveys a cozier feeling than the former.

Example:

A: It was lovely seeing you, Mrs. Anderson. You should come for dinner with us this weekend. Please let Mr. Anderson come too.
 
B: Thank you for the invitation. We could do that, for sure.

 

6. It was good talking to you

Leaning towards the neutral side, “It was good talking to you” is something we would use if we want to avoid sounding a bit over the top.

Plain and simple, “It was good talking to you” is something we could use with relatively distant connections, such as those we do not necessarily interact with all the time.

Example:

A: It was good talking to you again after a while, Reese. We should hang out again soon.
 
B: I missed having these conversations with you, too, Farrah. We could meet for coffee tomorrow if you’re free.

 

7. I enjoyed talking to you

Like “It was good talking to you,” using “I enjoyed talking to you” also helps in avoiding impressions of being overrated.

We can use this expression, for instance, when dealing with business acquaintances with whom we bump into at random.

Example:

A: This is such a wonderful day. I enjoyed talking to you, Mark.
 
B: Yes. Same here. Thanks for your time, Bob.

 

8. I had a lovely time with you

Similar to “It was lovely seeing you,” “I had a lovely time with you” also bears a warm and intimate connotation.

The difference is that “I had a lovely time with you” sounds even more pleasant than “It was lovely seeing you” because of the deliberate use of the pronoun “I.”

We can make use of “I had a lovely time with you” to sound way more likable and genuine than “It was lovely seeing you.”

Example:

A: Such a great party! I had a lovely time with you, guys. Until next time!
 
B: Thank you for coming tonight, Jane. Take care!

 

9. I had a great time with you

Another simple and direct goodbye expression we can use is “I had a great time with you.” This one also implies the act of “speaking” or “talking” with the other person even if it is not stated.

“I had a great time with you” works well in contexts where we want to thank multiple individuals for inviting us over to a small event or gathering.

Example:

A: Such an awesome evening. I had a great time with you, everyone. Thank you very much.
 
B: Thanks for inviting us over. See you again soon!

 

10. It was an honor to speak with you

Highly formalistic in tonality, “It was an honor to speak with you” is something we would use in special cases.

These special cases entail having a relationship distance, particularly with a message receiver who is most likely an authority figure.

The other person may generally respond with “The honor is mine” to show politeness and gratitude to the speaker.

Example:

A: It was an honor to speak with you, Mr. Johnson. Thank you very much.
 
B: The honor is mine. Thank you for having me.

 

11. It was a privilege to meet you

Like “It was an honor to speak with you,” “It was a privilege to meet you” also bears a very respectful, cautious tone.

We can make use of this expression when we talk to someone that we highly respect or admire a lot.

Example:

A: It was a privilege to meet you and hear some great insights, Dr. Patterson.
 
B: It was great to be here, too, Val. Thank you for the invitation.

 

12. Nice catching up with you

Last but not least, “Nice catching up with you” is something we would tend to limit using among the dearest or closest people around.

When compared to “It was a pleasure speaking with you,” this expression is inarguably more casual because of the usage of the idiomatic verb phrase “to catch up.”

Example:

A: Nice catching up with you, Tilly. See you around!
 
B: You too, Henry. Take care!
 
 

“It was a pleasure talking to you” alternatives mainly used in email writing

While most of the expressions above can indeed be useful in both real life encounters and email correspondence, the following two expressions are mainly used in email writing and other written contexts. 

In email writing, it is very important to provide as much information as possible because we don’t get to see the other person’s gestures and facial reactions.

 

13. It was a pleasure talking to you (earlier) over the phone

If we have had an initial interaction with a person over the phone or any other voice-communication platform, we should say “It was a pleasure talking to you over the phone today.”

Including a detail like “over the phone” makes the writer more visible to the receiver of the message, and it makes the recall process a lot easier.

Also, instead of using “today”, other adverbials can obviously be used such as “earlier” as in “It was a pleasure talking to you earlier on the phone.”

Example:

Dear Miss Cara,
 
It was a pleasure talking to you over the phone today. Thank you for taking the time to take a chance on my job application. Should you be interested in hiring me as one of your sales associates, I will make sure to do my best to contribute to the company.
 
Warmest regards,

 
Jodie Wilson

 
14. It was a pleasure talking to you yesterday/last week/this morning/earlier today

Another detail we can include is the time in which the discussion took place. This strategy also makes the message receiver remember who the writer of the email message is.

We could specify when the talk or discussion happened by using time expressions like “yesterday,” “last week,” “this morning,” and so on.

Example:

Dear Ms. Martin,
 
It was a pleasure talking to you yesterday at the seminar. You were such an incredible speaker, and your innovative ideas have convinced most if not all of us who attended it. I would be glad to hear more about your other programs if given the chance. If you have other upcoming seminars, I would love to sign up for them.
 
Sincerely,

 
Dhalia

 

Frequently Asked Questions on “Alternatives for ‘It was a pleasure speaking with you’”

 

Can we use “It was a pleasure speaking with you” in an email?

We can use “It was a pleasure speaking with you” when emailing a person that has recently been introduced to us by another person. This is a great email opener especially when we want to formally introduce ourselves to a business prospect or a possible employer.

 

Is it correct to say “It was a pleasure speaking with you yesterday”?

It is grammatically correct to say “It was a pleasure speaking with you yesterday” because the time expression “yesterday” precisely coincides with the verb tense in this sentence. “Was” is one of the simple past forms of “be.”

 

How can we thank someone for speaking with us over the phone?

We can thank someone for speaking with us via phone by using the expression “It was a pleasure speaking with you over the phone earlier today/this afternoon/yesterday, Mr./Ms. Doe.”

 

Conclusion

Exchanging positive greetings such as hellos and goodbyes is common across most, if not all, cultures around the world.

These acts make a lot of sense because we need them to maintain both professional and intimate relationships with everyone around us.