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erronousRogue

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Everything posted by erronousRogue

  1. This one's just evil. She sells sea-shells on the sea-shore. The shells she sells are sea-shells, I'm sure. For if she sells sea-shells on the sea-shore Then I'm sure she sells sea-shore shells.
  2. Race/appearances typically matter more than your accent. Even if you speak in a sophisticated or overly posh way, it won't make people think of you any higher, if anything it sounds somewhat pretentious.
  3. I hold music composition/singing higher than plain old poetry, personally. No idea why, I just don't like the form factor. Words that rhyme being carefully chosen in a rhythmic fashion just demands to be incorporated into a song somehow.
  4. I really don't like Irish for some reason. It just sounds too coarse. I also don't understand the fascination with North American "urban" accents, rap culture and the like. Suppose I just find it boring.
  5. A bit cruel perhaps, but mine's "Wealth doesn't buy happiness, but neither does poverty." I like quotes that are built upon cliché phrases in general.
  6. I'm usually pretty slow. I don't know why, but I tend to lose track of text every now and then, especially when reading long papers or books. I have to wait a couple seconds and start again constantly. My writing speeds are decent at least.
  7. Not particularly in school, but it's pretty important for me when talking to someone or writing a post online. Mostly spelling/typing errors, grammatical mistakes not much. I feel immeasurable levels of hatred whenever I see someone mix up their/there/they're and your/you're though. It's one of my pet peeves.
  8. Oddly enough, I'm told it was "baby". I guess my parents used to say it a lot, hah.
  9. Mine is pure fascination, mostly originating from reading mangas and anime back in the day. Eastern cultures and languages are also pretty unique, and I prefer Japanese out of the lot. I know it shares some of its culture and writing system with Chinese, but there's something about the language that makes me more interested than the other ones. I guess Japanese is the most "refined" out of the lot.
  10. I prefer to watch things in their original language simply because the dubs are worse. The original director of the series put effort into it and selected actors he wanted for the role, based on his own preferences and ideas which are usually not public. The dubs try to recreate them by simply matching how the characters approximately sound, often to the detriment of their unique quirks or personality traits. Subtitles on the other hand don't ruin the experience, and they allow you to recognise most of the original "feeling" of the script, while still being able to understand it. Jokes and puns are also explained instead of being cut out or replaced with translated versions. It's especially true for anime, when copulas and honorary suffixes typically get abridged in the translation, or replaced with completely different Western equivalents that are roughly similar (Japanese wordsmithing and a character speaking in rhymes substituted by urban rap culture, etc.). Different characters also tend to have different traits, and use slang words/add to sentences in a way that's not reflected in the translation.
  11. I make it a point to avoid "but" as much as I can. I do have a habit of starting everything with "yeah" and adding "though" at the end of sentences, though (ha).
  12. Cockney and Formal British are definitely my favourite. Scottish/Irish would also rank near the top. Jamaican is pretty cool too.
  13. Very rarely. "hah" or "haha" sometimes, allcaps if it's really funny.
  14. Here they are in Hungarian (god how do we come up with these things). Kutya (dog): vau-vau Kakas (cock): kukurikú Béka (frog): brek Kecske (goat): baa Macska (cat) : miau Tehén (cow): muuh
  15. I find "excellent" to be one of the most refined words in my thesaurus. It just rolls right off the tongue. "Genesis" is also pretty good, although it's more Latin.
  16. A modern equivalent of the word would be "scam" or "deceit". "Fraud" is pretty much the same, although it's typically used within a more serious, legal context.
  17. "Ostentatious". Alternative is the word "member" being used to refer to male genitalia. Funny how many words we've invented for that.
  18. Out of the available online translation utilities, I'd say that Google's is probably the most accurate. It's terrible for lesser known languages and slang, but works flawlessly for things like shorter sentences in German > English, or when used as a dictionary.
  19. It was a pretty similar process for me, since I didn't learn either of them by "forcing" myself from a book or anything, I just learned it by talking to people. To be honest I'm still pretty shameful when it comes to technical grammar and rules, whether it's English or my native language.
  20. For me it's "Yeah". It's not even a word really, it's more like just a sound. I place it almost everywhere I can, whether it's to start sentences or just to add something.
  21. Pretty early on, since it was somewhat of a requirement for the internet and technology in general. My native language isn't English, so I had to adapt rather early. Our school had basic classes which taught the language to some extent, but I think it's mostly thanks to myself being online a lot that I managed to speak English to an acceptable degree by the time I was about 14 or so.
  22. Although it's mostly thanks to tourism, I have definitely noticed something of the sort in my country. Near popular tourist locations and bigger towns, it's not unusual to see signs, menus and the like have English and German subtitles under them, even if the people owning the place don't speak the language themselves. I think it's definitely a positive approach, and most countries are leaning towards it, even with more "xenophobic" countries like Japan or France.
  23. Speaking, especially overcoming accents. I have a pretty high standard of making myself sound "believable", or at least not too out of place when trying to speak a foreign language. There's also the issue of the more "modern" aspects of languages and slang words being used, which typically can't be learned or mastered just from books.
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