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Linguaholic

maryannballeras

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maryannballeras last won the day on March 4 2017

maryannballeras had the most liked content!

About maryannballeras

  • Rank
    Ghostwriter

Converted

  • Currently studying
    None yet -- but interested in learning Japanese
  • Native tongue
    Filipino
  • Fluent in
    English

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  1. I think it's always good to have a certificate for something you've learned. Not for bragging and all, but mostly as a black and white proof of your skills. If it doesn't cost too much, I suggest that you get a certificate. You will surely reap your rewards by doing so and the good thing is that, it can stay in your CV for as long as you want. In my view, I think of it as an investment.
  2. Hi! Nice having your here on the forum. I admire you because you like to learn Chinese. I actually like the language too but I get discouraged every time I see the Chinese characters. I feel like it's too difficult for me. Well, I hope you can learn a lot here! And also, please share some of your knowledge too. We'll be glad to learn from you as well.
  3. I don't actually know why, but when I get angry, I feel like I speak English more naturally and fluently. It seems that words just naturally flow out. I know that it doesn't make any sense saying it bluntly like this, but this is what I often experience. Does someone know the reason for this?
  4. I learn a language best by exposure. I immerse myself in the language as much as I can using things that I find enjoyable. For example, I watch Japanese Animes and shows so that I can learn the language easier. I am learning and enjoying at the same time and it doesn't feel like a burden at all. I even try to use some words in my everyday life for me to remember it.
  5. I agree with this because I have experienced this firsthand. I learned English by watching English movies and listening to English radio programs. You get to pick up not just the words but alsp the rhythm of their language even without trying. I think this a very good alternative in learning a language because it is enjoyable.
  6. Like Baburra, I also like to learn Japanese so that I can watch shows without needing subtitles. I'm such a very big Anime and Manga fan. But aside from that, the process itself of learning Japanese is already motivational. It encourages me to continue learning more especially when I encounter some words that are very useful and very common in casual conversations. It gives me a feeling of satisfaction just by learning something new.
  7. It's not technically easier, but it comes off as that because people tend to become more interested in it. I actually experienced that first hand. I teach English to Koreans and one of my students asked me to teach her my own language (I'm Filipino, by the way.) They first thing they wanted to learn were the curse words. They wanted to prank their friends and pull tricks on them using another language.
  8. I like listening to Japanese music. Music-wise, I think Japanese people put a little bit of Jazz in their songs regardless if it's rock, alternative, etc. Since I'm a big Jazz fan, that's one big positive point for me. They also have very catchy phrases in their songs. When it comes to the language, as I've mentioned in another thread, I really love the Japanese syllables. They're easy to learn and it's like music to my ears. It's very rhythmic in my opinion and very expressive as well.
  9. I think if you get to the point wherein you can already speak with a native speaker without any hesitation and you could even joke using the language, you could already be called a "fluent" speaker. I teach English to Koreans and I encounter students who feel they are fluent, but when we start joking around and all, they would lose it. I think that means they're not that comfortable with the language just yet. If you can already think using the language and not by translating your thought word per word, that is also an indicator.
  10. I'm quite exposed to different languages like English, Spanish, Japanese, and Korean. Putting English aside, I think Japanese is the easiest for me to learn. I love how their syllables are not complicated and you can even learn the basics of the language on your own. I've tried that before through some websites and it worked. However, since I didn't actually use it, I somehow forgot most of it. But, yes, in my opinion, I think Japanese is pretty easy.
  11. Hi, Magicdave! Welcome to the forum! Well, you just came at the right place. You can definitely learn a lot of new things here when it comes to language. Also, if you have any ideas that you want to share, please feel free to do so! Enjoy your stay here.
  12. I don't see any significant difference, to be honest, in regards to me being "smart." In fact, because of these latest technologies, I get distracted most of the time. I'm not saying that today's technology is bad, but rather, it can lead a person to think that it's okay to not to put much effort in studying.
  13. If I have to study alone, I always prefer to do it inside my room. I feel more focused and I can concentrate more when there's less noise and distraction. And in my case, my bedroom would be the best place to go for. It's very quiet and relaxing. But it can get too relaxing, because I tend to fall asleep sometimes!
  14. I don't have any kids yet but in the future, I'll be more than happy to teach them the languages that I already know. I think learning more than one language makes a child smarter. And of course, who wouldn't want their kids to be smart?
  15. Thinking of using Google Translate is not a good idea at all. It sometimes translates sentences on a word per word basis. And as we all know, different languages have different sentence constructions. Because of this, what usually comes out on Google Translate is something that is of no sense.
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