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Linguaholic

Portuguese speaking


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I will post this in English to make possible all the members understand me.

I can read and understand Portuguese because it is very similar to Spanish (as Italian too) but I cannot talk Portuguese because my vocabulary is limited and although I always try to learn each new Portuguese word that I don't understand but seek its meaning, I can't say to be fluid on this language.

Sadly, I have not longer time to learn other languages that ones I know today, and seek to perfect instead.

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I also notice that the Portuguese in Portugal and Brazil are very different especially in pronunciation and some vocabulary (not so much in the written and formal forms). The spoken form of Brazilian also uses a lot of slang that is different from European Portuguese.

European Portuguese sounds very fast and guttural and many vowels are not pronounced and sound like a cross between French and Russian. Brazilian Portuguese is more musical and fluid.

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It's true, Brazilian Portuguese seems like a song to us Portuguese, it's just their thing, and also many words are different.

If anyone wants to practice some Portuguese, let me know. :)

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Guest isabbbela

I also notice that the Portuguese in Portugal and Brazil are very different especially in pronunciation and some vocabulary (not so much in the written and formal forms). The spoken form of Brazilian also uses a lot of slang that is different from European Portuguese.

European Portuguese sounds very fast and guttural and many vowels are not pronounced and sound like a cross between French and Russian. Brazilian Portuguese is more musical and fluid.

Well, thank you for the "musical and fluid", it's better than sounding guttural! Lol.

I'm from Brazil, so I speak Portuguese (Brazilian Portuguese, obviously).

Portuguese from here and Portugal are indeed quite different. In fact, whenever I meet friends from Portugal we end up speaking in English cause I find it so hard to understand what they are saying! And that goes both ways.

We've had some grammar changed a couple of years ago in Brazil to make it standard with Pt Portuguese, but that only really made a difference for some written words. Spoken Portuguese remains the same, and I don't think the differences could ever change. Our language is very informal and laid back, in my opinion. I guess that is why many people say it sounds musical.

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Really isabbbela you speak with your Portuguese friends in English? I am pretty sure I would understand a Brazilian, we have thousands of them living here in Portugal.

JellyFish, you can start by learning Bom dia, Boa tarde, Boa noite (Good Morning, Good Afternoon, Good evening).

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Guest isabbbela

Really isabbbela you speak with your Portuguese friends in English? I am pretty sure I would understand a Brazilian, we have thousands of them living here in Portugal.

I do, because we are usually with people from other countries as well, and it's easier when everybody speaks the same language. I find that people from Portugal have a better understanding of the Portuguese from Brazil because they listen to a lot of Brazilian music (in fact when I asked someone to show me music from Portugal they showed me Brazilian Funk ¬¬), but in Brazil I have never heard or seen anyone hearing to Portuguese music, so we are not at all used to Portuguese from Portugal, aside from things our grandparents or elderly relatives will say (my grandma was born in Portugal). There wasn't a rush of Portuguese immigrants for a while here, so most immigrants learned to speak in a different accent already, and their children learned to speak our way.

Don't get me wrong, I think the Portuguese accent is beautiful, and you definitely speak more grammatically correct than we do in here, but it's easier for me to understand English than Portuguese from Portugal! Specially when it's from Açores or Madeira.

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I see your point, we also have a lot of Brazilian TV contents and that helps. On the other hand, I also have a hard time understanding Portuguese from Madeira and Açores sometimes...  :nerd:

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Yes, accents are really different from regions, but I imagine that happens with German too and all the other languages. Particularly the Açores accent is really difficult to understand, not mentioning some Brazilians and the African countries.

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  • 1 month later...

Yes, accents are really different from regions, but I imagine that happens with German too and all the other languages. Particularly the Açores accent is really difficult to understand, not mentioning some Brazilians and the African countries.

I would say Açoreano is even harder to understand than Brazilian Portuguese or even Spanish :)

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Há quanto tempo estás em França Ricardo? Ainda te lembras como se fala português?  :tongue:

Haha, estou aqui à coisa de dois anos. O meu maior problema é os teclados franceses não terem alguns acentos. :/

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Já ouvi desculpas melhores mas tudo bem.  :wacky:

É uma pena que não apareçam aqui pessoas para praticar português, é uma oportunidade excelente de aprender. Talvez tu me possas ajudar com o meu francês, vou para a thread de praticar francês passas por lá?

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Já ouvi desculpas melhores mas tudo bem.  :wacky:

É uma pena que não apareçam aqui pessoas para praticar português, é uma oportunidade excelente de aprender. Talvez tu me possas ajudar com o meu francês, vou para a thread de praticar francês passas por lá?

E verdade. E "é" com acento é uma tecla especifica, e não se consegue por um "E" maiusculo com acento, nem tem acentos graves. O teclado é diferente.

Eu não sei escrever muito bem francês mas posso la passar.

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Podes sempre instalar o português no teu pc e quando estiveres a escrever alternas o teclado e pões um autocolante onde estão os acentos.  :wink:

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Sim, com um teclado externo deixa de ser portátil. Mas os acentos também são só dois ou três, possivelmente até decoras o sitio deles sem os autocolantes.

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Another native Portuguese right here!

Regarding the question of accents, it's all a matter of practice. Some regional dialects may be easier to grasp than others, but if communication is longer than a few hours, after a while there should be no problems. I've had initial trouble with speakers from Timor, some parts of Brazil, the islands of Madeira and Azores, and yes, even some areas of Continental Portugal, but nothing that continually speaking and hearing with them didn't solve. Also, if any troubles do arise, the old trick of asking people to speak slower still works wonders.

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Mas ja viste a chatisse que é estar sempre a trocar a toda a hora? Eu faço a maior parte das coisas na internet em inglês, por isso é realmente inervante estar sempre a fazer alt+shift para mudar.

Bom, depende se queres escrever português correcto ou não, não dá assim tanto trabalho. Já agora, chatice (e não chatisse) e enervante (e não enervante).  :smile:

Olá Kotro, benvindo ao forum! És de onde?  :pirate:

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