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“I confirm my attendance to the interview” — 10 Alternatives

“I confirm my attendance to the interview” — 10 Alternatives

Receiving an invitation to an interview is the very first thing that makes us jump for joy when we are in search of greener pastures in the occupational world.

Well, why not?

Getting invited to an interview makes us feel that the tedious job application processes we had to endure for days, or even weeks, are actually worth every drop of sweat.

But, before we could get dressed to the teeth for our long-awaited interview, we’ve got to let our prospective employer know that there’s no way we’d be abandoning the ship out of the blue.

So, here are ten formal and practical ways to confirm our availability for a job interview.

Let’s get down to business straight away.

 

Ten other ways to tell an employer you’re not ditching their interview

For the most part, getting an interview invitation is head and shoulders above receiving a job offer because the latter tends to make us feel hesitant at times.

Responding to a job offer entails asking questions to make sure you are on the same page with your employer.

Sometimes, a job offer may initially be given through a phone call when some of the applicant’s test results aren’t available yet or when the employer wants to take some precautions.

Hence, knowing how to ask for time to consider a job offer over the phone is another must-have negotiation skill that is crucial in making one of the biggest decisions in your life.

Before you could get to these edge-of-the-seat situations, you will have to receive an email message or a call from a recruitment staff first.

This message has an enthusiastic, congratulatory tone, and it also contains details and instructions about your job interview.

Just so you know, a job posting may be removed before your scheduled interview, but this is not necessarily something you should worry about because this is a typical activity in the recruitment world.

Therefore, it is your duty as a job seeker to know the possible reasons why a job post gets taken down as well as what to do next in case this happens.

Language in itself is inherently ambiguous, and it is thus part of our role to use language as clearly as we can in any given context, even in tasks as mundane as confirming availability for an interview.

Of course, there are situations where we can deliberately make use of ambiguous language to create a different perspective for our audiences, such as in evoking humor and emphasis.

But since you’re not reading anything close to a stand-up comedy script, the following statements will help you become more flexible in responding to a job interview invitation instead.

 

1. Please accept this email as an official confirmation for my interview on (date)

Feel free to use this statement if you feel like you need to put a considerable amount of psychological distance between you and the employer.

Sometimes, we could really get prompted to use a highly formalistic tone when responding to people we perceive as “authority figures.”

More often than not, these people also overtly use highly formal language in their discourses which is what makes you want to do the same.

Here’s an example email message using the first alternative:

 

Dear Dr. Hoffman,

 

I hope this email finds you well. I have successfully received your interview invitation email. Please accept this email as an official confirmation for my interview on September 24th, 2021, at 9:00 am at your clinic. Kindly let me know if you need any further information before the interview.

 

2. This is to confirm my availability for an interview on (date)

Another quite detached, and therefore, formal way of confirming our availability can be done by using “This is to confirm my availability for an interview on (date).”

If you are in hopes of sounding serious about the job role but do not want to use too much white space in your email, feel free to use this expression instead.

You can start with a greeting message, proceed to the confirmatory message with the interview date, then end with a call-to-action prompt that aims to offer assistance to the addressee.

Here’s how that goes:

Dear Ms. Layla,

 

Hope all is well with you and your family. This is to confirm my availability for an interview on September 25, 2021. Please do not hesitate to reach out anytime if you need further information.

 

Best regards,

Janice L. Vaughn

 

3. I am pleased to confirm my availability for a job interview on (day)

“I am pleased to confirm my availability for a job interview on (day)” is another formal yet undetached way to respond to a job interview invitation.

This one uses a personal touch for starting with the first-person subject pronoun “I,” and it is therefore great if you want to sound less uptight in your response.

Nowadays, most people who correspond regularly prefer this more neutral approach, as opposed to a highly rigid and formalistic one.

Here’s how you can use this statement in an email:

Dear Sandra,

 

Happy Monday to you! I am pleased to confirm my availability for a job interview on Thursday at 2 pm. I am looking forward to sharing how I can contribute to your company. Please don’t hesitate to reach out for any other information you might need before the interview.

 

Warm regards,

Patricia Holmes

 

4. I would like to confirm my availability for an interview on (day)

However, you may also use “I would like to confirm my availability for an interview on (day)” in case you want to do away with the personal tone.

Discarding the participial adjective “pleased” turns your message into a more formal one, yet it still bears some degree of personalization because of the retention of the subject pronoun “I.”

Here’s how you might want to use this statement:

Dear Ms. Jones,

 

Thank you very much for your last email. I would like to confirm my availability for an interview on Wednesday at 10 am. I am looking forward to the interview as well as meeting you in person. Please let me know if there would be any other information you’d like to have before Wednesday.

 

Best regards,

Matthew Peters

 

5. I am available for an interview at your earliest convenience

Another option that you can use as you wish is “I am available for an interview at your earliest convenience.”

This is a great response when the interview invitation message is asking for your availability instead of just informing you of a previously decided interview date.

Telling your addressee that you are available at their earliest convenience suggests enthusiasm towards the role, as well as schedule flexibility.

You might structure your email message this way:

Dear Mr. Roberts,

 

Thank you for your update. I am available for an interview at your earliest convenience. I eagerly look forward to sharing in detail how I can be an asset to your organization. Please don’t hesitate to contact me for any other information you might need.

 

Kind regards,

Paul Aniston

 

6. I am available for an interview anytime this week

However, you may also strategically use “I am available for an interview anytime this week” to express that you are available anytime soon.

This statement is therefore more enthusiastic than “I am available for an interview at your earliest convenience” because of the added temporal details.

You can use this if you want to prompt your target employer to give you an interview the soonest possible time on your end.

Dear Amy,

 

Thank you for your email. I hope you’re doing great today. I am available for an interview anytime this week. Please don’t hesitate toreach out anytime if you need further information. I look forward to seeing you soon.

 

Best regards,

Amanda Garcia

 

7. I am confirming my availability for an interview on (date)

If the interview invitation message leans more toward confirming your availability on a date that the employer has decided, you can simply use “I am confirming my availability for an interview on (date).”

Using the present progressive tense (i.e., I am confirming) is slightly less formal than the use of the simple present tense (i.e., I confirm).

Feel free to use this confirmatory statement if the indicated date works for you.

Dear Ms. Paulson,

 

I am confirming my availability for an interview on Septermber 24, 2021. I will be available anytime between 9 am and 6 pm on that day. Thank you very much for your update, and I am looking forward to speaking with you soon.

 

Sincerely,

Felicity Henson

 

8. I confirm my availability for an interview on (day)

If you want to slightly increase the formality level of “I am confirming my availability for an interview on (date),” then you can structure your sentence in the simple present tense.

Doing so turns your message’s connotation into a more serious one, which is is therefore great when you’re applying for a relatively more serious job role.

Here’s how:

Dear Mr. Atkins,

 

I really appreciate your update. Thank you very much for considering me for the Assistant Professor position in your institution. I confirm my availability for an interview on Friday morning. I am looking forward to discussing more details with you soon.

 

Yours respectfully,

Jennifer L. Schmidt

 

9. I confirm my availability on the proposed date and time

You may also use “I confirm my availability on the proposed date and time” if you want to avoid reiterating the details that have already been clearly stated in the previous email.

This confirmatory message is polite yet slightly detached, and hence useful when you want to stick with using a neutrally formal tone throughout your email message.

Here’s another example showing its usage in a concise email response:

Dear Ms. Miller,

 

Thank you for your email. I confirm my availability on the proposed date and time. I am looking forward to seeing you soon.

 

Regards,

Perry Reynolds

 

10. I confirm my availability on (day)

Last but not least, “I confirm my availability on (day)” is the shortest formal way of communicating an affirmative response to an interview invitation.

You may use this statement when you want your email to be skimmed on by the recipient, thereby saving their time and effort.

Writing short response emails demonstrates avoiding informational redundancy, and hence it is a great way to show to your addressee that you value their time and effort.

 

Here’s one last example:

Dear Jack,

 

Thanks for your email. I confirm my availability on Tuesday.

 

Hope you’ll enjoy the rest of your day.

 

Regards,

Dylan Griffin

 

Frequently Asked Questions on “Confirmation Messages”

 

How can we reply to a job interview invitation?

You can affirm your availability on a proposed date and time if the details work for you. Otherwise, you can politely decline the proposed interview date and suggest an alternative schedule.

 

How can we respond to a confirmation email?

The most common responses to a confirmation email include “Thank you,” “Thank you very much,” “Many thanks,” and “This is acknowledged.”

 

Should we say “I confirm my attendance ‘to’ or ‘for’ the interview”?

As for the preposition usage, “I confirm my attendance to the interview” is more appropriate, but more generally speaking, “I confirm my availability for the interview” is a better way to express the same intent.

 

Conclusion

Although confirmatory messages seem trite and formulaic, they are inarguably essential in making official arrangements happen.

Writing messages this way is also the clearest form of language that is beneficial in preventing chances of misinterpretation, especially in the commercial world.

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