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Comma after “currently”: The Definitive Guide

Comma after “currently”: The Definitive Guide

Some words or phrases are often or always used in a way that means they will need to be followed by a comma.

Other words or phrases can take up several different positions in a sentence. Whether or not a comma is needed will vary based on where the word is.

“Currently” is an example of the second type of word. Let’s take a look at when you do and don’t need a comma after “currently.”
 

 

Do you need a comma after “currently”?

When “currently” is the introductory word at the beginning of a sentence or independent clause, you need a comma after it. “Currently” can also come at the end of an independent clause, and you need a comma after it if it is joined to another independent clause with a conjunction. You also need a comma after “currently” when it is followed by a nonessential clause. The rest of the time, “currently” usually does not need to be followed by a comma.

“Currently” is an adverb, and it can appear in several different places in a sentence.

Most of the time, whether or not to put a comma after “currently” is not about the word itself but about where it falls in the sentence.

 

“Currently” as an introductory word

When “currently” comes at the beginning of a sentence or independent clause, it should be followed by a comma.

Here are a few examples:

Currently, I cannot comment on the situation.
They used to have a lot of boots for sale, but currently, they are only selling sandals.
Yesterday, they spent the day hiking; currently, they are lounging by the pool.

This falls under the rule that introductory words or phrases should be followed by a comma.

This includes a number of words dealing with time just as “currently” does, such as “later,” “yesterday,” “today“,  and “sometimes.”

Comma Usage after "currently"

 

“Currently” at the end of an independent clause

Any time you join two independent clauses with a conjunction, the clauses need to be separated by a comma.

This means that if “currently” is at the end of the first independent clause, it will be followed by a comma.

Here are two examples:

She is working in Berlin currently, and she will transfer to Paris next year.
We have enough flour currently, but we will need to buy more if we make bread.

 

“Currently” in other positions

When it appears in other places in the sentence, “currently” usually does not need to be followed by a comma unless it comes before a nonessential clause.

 

When a comma is not needed

“Currently” often comes just before or after the verb it is modifying, and in those cases, it does not need a comma. It may also be placed in between a series of verbs.

Here are a few examples:

We currently have no information about that.
The valuables are currently in the safe.
She is currently reading a book about horses.
The streets are currently being cleaned for the festival.

 

When a comma is needed

You may need a comma after “currently” if it is followed by a nonessential clause.

A nonessential clause may come in the middle of a sentence or at the end of a sentence. It adds more information, but it could also be removed from the sentence without changing its meaning.

Notice that, as mentioned above, the word being “currently” is not the issue. The comma is needed because you are setting a nonessential clause off from the rest of the sentence with a comma.

We don’t know currently, although that could change, whether the award will be given.
They are studying French currently, which will help them in their travels.

Note that if you moved the word “currently” around, the comma would not follow it. The comma would still come after the last word before the nonessential clause:

We don’t currently know, although that could change, whether the award will be given.
They are currently studying French, which will help them in their travels.

 

Using “currently” in your writing

“Currently” is a frequently overused word. It can be a “filler” word, meaning that it just takes up space without adding anything particularly useful to the sentence.

When it is useful, it is usually showing or implying a contrast.

For example, if you say “We currently have no information about that,” it suggests that you expect to have the information at a later date.

If you don’t ever expect to have the information, you could leave out the word entirely—and you wouldn’t have to worry about whether you needed a comma at all!