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10 Ways to Use “Please Advise” in Business Correspondence

10 Ways to Use “Please Advise” in Business Correspondence

No matter how seasoned we become in our professions, we still need to seek advice from others. We mainly do this by using the phrase “please advise.”

Although most of us make use of this expression in email writing, we could still get confused as to how to apply it in other contexts every once in a while.

So, we have prepared a list of sentence patterns wherein “please advise” can be effectively used.

Let’s have a quick look at all of these first. 

  1. Please advise on [this matter/how to proceed/the next steps/the status]
  2. Please advise your [availability/convenient date and time/current period notice/ approval]
  3. Please advise me [on the following/if I am wrong/for further action/accordingly]
  4. Please advise the [payment status for/next course of action/delivery date/best time]
  5. Please advise if [otherwise/you have any concerns/anything else is required/this will suffice]
  6. Please advise as [necessary/to the status/to whom/as to whether]
  7. Please advise us [immediately/ahead of time/at your earliest convenience/on ways to improve]
  8. Please advise should [any questions arise/you have any clarifications/you need further assistance/there be any changes]
  9. Please advise and [confirm/comment/review/suggest]
  10. Could you please advise [on how to proceed with/whether you agree/me on this matter/on how to resolve]

 

Understanding the expression “please advise” a bit deeper

“Please advise” is a commonly used phrase in business correspondence, especially for internal communication purposes.

Internal communication means the act of talking and writing between and among employees and employers who work for the same organization.

As the expression is not limited to that context alone, it is also possible to use it in exchanges between students and teachers, and others.

By and large, “please advise” is different from “please be advised” in terms of the point of view of the one using the expression.

“Please advise” is what a person who is seeking advice would use, while “please be advised” is what the advice-giver would say or write.

So, it follows that the one using “please advise” often makes use of a relatively more consultative tone in the exchange.

Take note that “advise” is a verb, and it has to be spelled with the letter “s” before “e.” Meanwhile, “advice” is a noun and should be spelled with the letter “c.”

In email writing, there is a multitude of ways in which we can use “please advise.” Some of these structures are applicable in many different situations.

Listed below are the most common expressions used together with “please advise” with examples for contextualization:

 

10 Ways to Use “Please Advise” in Email Writing and Business Correspondence

 

1. Please advise on [this matter/how to proceed/the next steps/the status]

Please advise on

“Please advise on” is something that is usually followed by a noun phrase or clause as “on” is a preposition.

“Please advise on this matter,” “please advise on how to proceed,” “please advise on the next steps,” and “please advise on the status” are some of the popular patterns that we can observe in email writing. 

 

Please advise on this matter

Direct and simple, “please advise on this matter” is used for referring back to a previously-described event or issue.

Example:

The previous analysis you have made on data set C appears to have some consistency-related issues. Please advise on this matter. Thank you.

 

Please advise on how to proceed

“Please advise on how to proceed” is a great introductory statement if we want to know the next steps to take in relation to a concern.

Example:

I have completed the final set of requirements asked by your office. Please advise on how to proceed. In case I missed anything, kindly let me know soon so I can comply. Thank you.

 

 

Please advise on the next steps

Example:

As I have already completed this week’s assigned task, please advise on the next steps to take. Also, if there are any issues regarding the task, kindly let me know soon. Thanks.

 
Synonymous with “please advise on how to proceed,” “please advise on the next steps” is simply a less formal version of the expression.

 

Please advise on the status

Example:

Please advise on the status of my pending tasks. As far as I know, I have followed all the given procedures and uploaded the necessary items on our productivity software tool.  I am looking forward to your reply on this.

 

For task and job application updates, “please advise on the status” is a great introductory phrase to use.

 

2. Please advise your [availability/convenient date and time/current period notice/ approval]

Please advise your

The determiner “your” should also be followed by a noun phrase to modify. Not using a noun phrase after “your” would make the sentence ungrammatical.

“Availability,” “convenient date and time,” “current period notice,” and “approval” are some of the expressions that often come after “please advise your.”

 

Please advise your availability

To check for someone’s available time, we can simply make use of “Please advise your availability…” in email writing.

This expression is best used when we intend to book a call or meeting with the recipient of the message.

Example:

I am reaching out to schedule a meeting with you this week or the next. Please advise your availability. Thank you in advance.

 

Please advise your convenient date and time

To be more specific in terms of booking a meeting, we can also do this politely by saying “please advise your convenient time and date.”

Example:

I am writing to ask whether you are available for a preliminary meeting next week regarding our project. If you are, please advise your convenient time and date. Thank you in advance.

 

Please advise your current period notice

For schedule policy-related concerns, we can use “please advise your notice period.” This works well in questions related to contract or agreement terms.

When seeking approval on a suggestion, plan, or report, the phrase “please advise your approval” works really well.

Example:

If my understanding is correct, I have thirty days before the expiry date to renew my agreement with your company. If not, please advise your current period notice regarding this particular matter. Thank you.

 

Please advise your approval 

Example:

I am submitting my report on the monthly performance evaluation of our workflow processes. Please advise your approval on this matter after your review. Thank you.

 

3. Please advise me [on the following/if I am wrong/for further action/accordingly]

Please advise me

If you want to specify that it is you, and not someone else, who is seeking advice from a person, then you should use “please advise me.”

“Please advise me” can be followed by “if I am wrong,” “for further action,” or “accordingly” in email writing.

If we have several items on our list of concerns, “please advise me on the following…” is a great expression to use.

We can use a colon after this introductory phrase and list down our concerns in bullet or number format.

 

Please advise me on the following

Example:

Please advise me on the following concerns: (1) When is the target date for running the new newsletter script? (2) I have some messaging framework-related clarifications with Helen. As we still haven’t formally met each other, could you maybe give me a brief introduction email to her?

 

Please advise me if I am wrong

For clarifications related to the understanding or interpretation of a task, announcement, or instruction, we can use the pattern “please advise me if I am wrong.”

Example:

Please advise me if I am wrong, but my understanding is this: We need not send our product reports to Joe anymore because from now on, Calvin will be taking over his role. Is this correct?

 

Please advise me for further action

If we have already completed a task or responsibility, and we need to know the next thing to do, we can say “please advise me for further action.”

As this expression is formal, it inarguably works well when communicating to a superior or any other authority figure.

Example:

This is to report that I have completed my tasks for the day. Please advise me for further action, if any. Thank you.

 

Please advise me accordingly

“Accordingly” is an adverb that suggests the meaning “appropriately” or “correspondingly.”

That said, “please advise me accordingly” is a great expression to use when seeking guidance about a particular request or concern.

Example:

I would like to be assigned within Maricopa County. If that is possible, please advise me accordingly. Thank you for your attention to this request.

 

4. Please advise the [payment status for/next course of action/delivery date/best time]

Please advise the

As “advise” is a transitive verb, it needs an object afterward to fully function. That said, a noun phrase should always come after the article “the” in “please advise the.”

Phrases like “payment status,” “next course of action,” “delivery date,” and “best time” often come after the article “the.”

 

Please advise the payment status

People may not necessarily remember all the information pieces they receive in a day or a week. This means emails can get lost in the virtual world from now and then.

Payment-related follow-up emails are especially tricky to execute because of the sensitivity of the subject.

When this is the case, we can simply follow up invoice payments by using “please advise the payment status,” which is formal and non-confrontational.

Example:

Hope you are doing well today. Please advise the payment status of the following attached invoice: [attachment] I forwarded the mentioned invoice on Monday last week (9 days ago), yet I have not received the payment yet. Thank you for your attention to this matter.

 

Please advise the next course of action

When asking for the succeeding steps concerning a task or event, “please advise the next course of action” is a formal phrase to use.

With its high degree of formality, it works really well in a bottom-top communication between a subordinate and a superior.

Example:

This is just to report that I have already completed the survey among my department’s members. When you have the time, please advise the next course of action. Thank you.

 

Please advise the delivery date

If you want to know the delivery schedule of your ordered package or parcel, the phrase that fits this is “please advise the delivery date.”

Example:

I wanted to follow up on my ordered parcel with the tracking number 876DFG48. Please advise the delivery date of this product. An estimated date should suffice. Thank you in advance.

 

Please advise the best time

Meanwhile, another polite way of asking for someone’s availability is by using “please advise the best time…”

Example:

This is just to follow up on the initially agreed meeting schedule with you and your new team members. Please advise the best time on Friday to have the video conference via the XYZ platform. Thank you.

 

5. Please advise if [otherwise/you have any concerns/anything else is needed/this will suffice]

Please advise if

To convey conditions, we normally make use of the conjunction “if.” “If” suggests the possibility of an act or event.

“If” is commonly followed by expressions like “otherwise,” “you have any concerns,” “anything else is required,” or “this will suffice.”

Please-Advise-in-Business-Correspondence-Pin

Please advise if otherwise

As our interpretation of a given piece of information may not always align with the giver of the message, we need to clarify things to make transactions smoother.

One effective expression to make use of when this happens is “please advise if otherwise.” An example is provided below to see how it works.

Example:

I am reaching out to confirm my understanding of the task. If my understanding is correct, I need to classify the documents according to their titles only and not the content, correct? Please advise if otherwise. Thank you.

 

Please advise if you have any concerns

If we want to know whether the other person clearly understands what we mean, or we simply want to offer further assistance, “please advise if you have any concerns” is a suitable expression to use.

Example:

Please see attached for the list of tools and materials needed for the upcoming conference. As this is an initial list, please advise if you have any concerns. Thank you.

 

Please advise if anything else is required

Another great further-assistance prompt is “please advise if anything else is required.” Very formal in its own right, we can never go wrong with this expression.
Example:

Attached in this email is the link to the list of articles that you need to read. I have also included tips and relevant proponents. Please advise if anything else is required.

 

Please advise if this will suffice

If we want to know whether what we have done or submitted is enough, we can say “please advise if this will suffice.”

This works well in contexts related to task or report completion, and it could also be used when giving instructions or definitions of concepts.

Example:

Kindly see the attached file for the monthly sales report of my team.
 
Please advise if this will suffice
, and please let me know if you have any questions about the details.

 

6. Please advise as [necessary/to the status/to whom/to whether]

Please advise as new

In “please advise as,” “as” generally conveys the same meaning as “concerning x” or “about x.”

However, it could also be used as an adverb to suggest the extent or degree of something, which typically is an adjective just like “necessary.”

“Necessary,” “to the status,” “to whom,” and “to whether” are some of the most widely used expressions that come after “please advise as.”

 

Please advise as necessary

If we do not want to impose on seeking advice immediately, the expression “please advise as necessary” is really appropriate.

Example:

I have attached in this email the needs assessment analysis as well as the procedures on how the analysis was done. Please advise as necessary.

 

Please advise as to the status

A bit wordy yet highly formal in tone and structure, “please advise as to the status…” is something we can use with sensitive issues like those related to complaints.

Example:

Please advise as to the status of employment of Mr. Victor Doe. There seem to be some contract-related concerns that he raised to me recently. Thank you in advance for this information.

 

Please advise as to whom

Meanwhile, if we want to be guided in communication-related contexts, “please advise as to whom…” is something that we can easily use.

This one is great for asking about communication channels, particularly a person to whom a concern is intended for.

Example:

Please advise as to whom do we assign the organization of the upcoming workshop on objection handling. We need to have one main organizer and a support staff of two or three people.

 

Please advise as to whether

Another great formal phrase we can use for issue clarification is “please advise as to whether…”

A complete clause that explains the issue in detail is expected to come after the word “whether” in this sentence structure.

Example:

My team is done with the content evaluation, and we are now waiting for the illustration team’s evaluation process to be done. Please advise as to whether we can push through with the book launch next month.

 

7. Please advise us [immediately/ahead of time/at your earliest convenience/on ways to improve]

Please advise us

If you want to refer to your whole team or department, it would be great to use “please advise us” instead.

Adverbial phrases related to time like “immediately,” “ahead of time,” “at your earliest convenience” usually come after “please advise us.”

Not limited to that, “on ways to improve” may also come after it. 

 

Please advise us immediately

Immediate actions are also necessary for making businesses work. As this is quite a demanding task, there is a need to be extra careful with our language use.

“Please advise us immediately” conveys extreme necessity but with a polite tone because of the word “please.”

Example:

Please advise us immediately regarding the book launch date and time. We are only waiting for your go signal to initiate it. Thank you.

 

Please advise us ahead of time

For preparation-related measures, the expression “please advise us ahead of time” works quite nicely.

We can use it when we want to ask for estimated details regarding target execution dates as well as task deadlines in advance.

Example:

Please advise us ahead of time of the target date for the initiative-taking training so we can prepare the necessary people and materials. If possible, we would like to know this information by the end of the day today.

 

Please advise us at your earliest convenience

To make requests more polite yet assertive at the same time, “please advise us at your earliest convenience” bodes quite well.

Example:

This is to report that the results have already been uploaded. They are now ready for our review. Please advise us at your earliest convenience when we should submit our consolidated report. Thank you.

 

Please advise us on ways to improve

When seeking advice from subject matter experts, “please advise us on ways to improve” is one of the best expressions to use.

This works well in contexts that entail careful attention because the root cause is quite sensitive, just like the next example. 

Example:

To report for the week, there have been three (3) customer complaints in Store X. These are related to the aggressive selling approach of our salespeople. Please advise us on ways to improve this issue. Thank you.

 

8. Please advise should [any questions arise/you have any clarifications/you need further assistance/there be any changes]

Please advise should

“Should” may also be used in place of “if.” We do so to make “if” more polite or less demanding in tone.

“Any questions arise,” “you have any clarifications,” “you need further assistance,” and “there be any changes” are the expressions that typically come after “please advise should.”

 

Please advise should any questions arise

To offer further assistance using “please advise,” we can also use “please advise should any questions arise.”

Here is the list of my department’s needed office supplies for the month. Please advise should any questions arise.

 

Please advise should you have any clarifications

If the information sent contains some complexity, it is needless to say that we should offer further clarification assistance.

When this is the case, “please advise should you have any clarifications…” is a great introductory expression to make use of.

Example:

I have attached my presentation to this email. A PDF has also been provided should you want to print it out. Please advise should you have any clarifications regarding the slide details.

 

Please advise should you need further assistance

Still related to offering further assistance, “please advise should you need further assistance” is clearly a straightforward expression to use.

Example:

This is to confirm that your account has been retrieved and reactivated successfully. Please advise should you need further assistance.

 

Please advise should there be any changes

If we want to get informed about future updates, “please advise should there be any changes” is a nice closing expression to use in our email.

Example:

I have reviewed and understood our roadmap for the upcoming quarter. Please advise should there be any changes in the future.

 

9. Please advise and [confirm/comment/review/suggest]

Please advise and

Other times, we also want to use another verb after “advise,” especially if our request entails multiple actions from the message receiver.

We often use “please advise and confirm,” “please advise and comment,” “please advise and review,” and “please advise and suggest” in this situation.

 

Please advise and confirm

Easy to understand, “please advise and confirm” is something we could make use of when our concern needs both consultation and confirmation of receipt.

Example:

Please advise and confirm receipt of the complaint report for Ms. Jane Doe of the sales department. The customer claims that she has been publicly mistreated by Ms. Doe at the store. Thank you for your guidance.

 

Please advise and comment

Meanwhile, if we only need the other person to provide a piece of feedback regarding a reported issue, “please advise and comment” is more suitable.

Example:

Please advise and comment on the issue I forwarded to you last week. Upon reviewing Ms. Doe’s performance, she has not been reported for any similar cases before.

 

Please advise and review

If our raised concern is something that needs both guidance and investigation, “please advise and review” is what we should use instead.

Example:

Please advise and review the attached issue on our workflow process: [attachment] Should there be anything unclear in the details, please let me know soon. Thank you.

 

Please advise and suggest

Astoundingly clear and simple, “please advise and suggest” is the go-to expression for guidance and recommendation-related concerns, especially solution-based ones.

Example:

Please advise and suggest alternative solutions to our product survey results. The main issue that users face at the moment is related to the interface. It appears that users are having a hard time navigating the website.

 

10. Could you please advise [on how to proceed with/whether you agree/me on this matter/on how to resolve]

Could you please advise

In general, to make requests even less clamorous and direct, we express them in question form instead.

To do this with “please advise,” we add the phrase “could you” in front of it. “On how to proceed,” “whether you agree” “me on this matter,” and “on how to resolve” often come afterward.

 

Could you please advise on how to proceed with

Asking about job application updates can be a bit of an intimidating task. That is because we do not want to be “too persistent” not “too indifferent” about it.

Job application processes can differ from one organization to another. With this in mind, job application statuses can also be tricky to understand.

What we can do to resolve this is to read and understand the meaning behind different job application statuses that are used by employers.

To make this task simpler, we can also just make use of the polite question “Could you please advise on how to proceed with the application?” to know the answer.

Example: 

Could you please advise on how to proceed with the application? I have already completed the behavioral and intellectual assessment. Thank you for your guidance.

 

Could you please advise your availability

Meanwhile, “Could you please advise your availability?” is something we use for politely asking about another person’s free time.

We mainly use this question in booking calls, video conferences, or even face-to-face meetings with other people.

Example: 

Could you please advise your availability for a quick sync-up meeting today? I am available between 13:00 to 17:00 CET.

 

Could you please advise whether you agree

In case we want to know the other person’s opinion or decision concerning a task, issue, or plan, we can make use of “Could you please advise whether you agree…?”

Example:

Could you please advise whether you agree with our proposed solution to the usability issue? Attached below is the preliminary plan my team has come up with in our last meeting. [attachment]

 

Could you please advise on how to resolve

Last but not least, we can also use the pattern “Could you please advise on how to resolve…?” if we are consulting something related to problem solutions.

Example: 

Could you please advise on how to resolve our concern related to the direct-campaign approach? The details of this issue are explained further in the attached video. Thank you in advance.

 

Frequently Asked Questions on “How to Use ‘Please Advise’ in a Sentence”

 

Should it be ‘please advise’ or “please advice”?

The verb form is the one spelled with the letter “s” or “advise.” So, the grammatically correct expression is “please advise” and not “please advice” because “advice” is a noun.

 

What does “please advise on how to proceed” mean?

“Please advise on how to proceed” is an expression that simply means “please tell me the next steps to take” or “kindly let me know what to do next.”

 

What is a formal and casual way of saying “please advise”?

We can increase the formality of “please advise” by asking the question “could you provide your thoughts on x…” and decrease its formality by using “let me know” or “tell me how to do x.”

 

Conclusion

No matter where we go or what we achieve, seeking advice is nothing less than necessary not only in business but also in our personal lives.

Therefore, knowing how to use phrases like “please advise” in a sentence with much flexibility is quite a handy skill to have.