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20 Ways to Say “Thank you for checking on me” with Examples

20 Ways to Say “Thank you for checking on me” with Examples

Although widely used and clear enough in terms of meaning, “Thank you for checking on me” may sometimes come off as an inappropriate message.

Why so? Well, that’s likely because we share different levels of relationships with those people who may check up on us.

To avoid sending out-of-place gratitude messages, we have listed twenty other ways to say “Thank you for checking on me” in various contexts.

Here’s a summary of these expressions for your easy reference: 

 

20 Ways to Say “Thank you for checking on me”

  1. Thank you for checking up on me.
  2. Thank you for checking in on me often.
  3. Thank you for constantly asking about me.
  4. Thank you for all the love and support.
  5. Thank you for being there for me.
  6. Thank you for thinking of me.
  7. Thanks for checking up on me.
  8. Your message means a lot to me.
  9. That’s very kind of you.
  10. A huge thank you. You are the best!
  11. What would I do without you?
  12. Thank you for your concern.
  13. Thanks for your concern.
  14. Thank you for reaching out to me.
  15. Thank you for the kind words.
  16. Thank you for your kind words.
  17. Thank you for your support.
  18. Your support is greatly appreciated.
  19. Your support means so much to me.
  20. I really appreciate your support.

 

Casual ways to say “Thank you for checking on me”

Casual messages related to “Thank you for checking on me” are likely seen on social media platforms rather than business platforms.

So, more than half of this post is dedicated to the former circumstance. But don’t worry because we have also included more formal messages towards the end.

In reality, our close friends and family members are the ones who offer support when we feel down in the dumps.

Here are some other casual ways to say “Thank you for checking on me” to avoid sounding either a little redundant or over the top.

 

1. Thank you for checking up on me.

“Thank you for checking up on me” is one of the most commonly used expressions these days. This expression is great because of its warm and relatively informal tone.

We mainly use “Thank you for checking up on me” with friends and relatives whom we care a lot about.

Using this expression appears to be common on social media posts as well as in direct messages.

Here’s how you may use “Thank you for checking on me” on a social media content post:

Example:

Hi, everyone. Thank you for checking up on me to make sure I’m good. I feel better now that I am at home. Though I still need to take some meds, being at home is a lot better than being at the hospital. Thank you, once again!

 

2. Thank you for checking in on me often.

“Thank you for checking in on me often” is a great expression too. The presence of the adverb “often” implies that the message receiver must either be a close friend or relative.

We particularly use this expression to those people who regularly visit, call, or text us whenever we feel down or in trouble.

The example below shows how you might be able to use “Thank you for checking in on me” in an actual message:

Example:

For those who are asking, thank you for checking in on me often and reminding me that you care. I know I haven’t been able to respond to all your messages, but please know that I have read all of them. See you soon!

 

3. Thank you for constantly asking about me.

Another way of thanking people who regularly check in on us is “Thank you for constantly asking about me.”

As you may know, “asking about someone” does not necessarily mean investigating or inquiring about some pieces of information.

It also means taking the time to send either a how’s-it-going or are-you-okay question to people that we care about.

To put this expression in context, here’s an example of its usage:

Example:

Thank you for constantly asking about me and making sure I’m alright. Things aren’t really back to normal yet, but they are way better now than a few weeks ago. Please know that I sincerely appreciate all your love and support!

 

4. Thank you for all the love and support.

Meanwhile, “Thank you for all the love and support” is something that we would likely use after serious events or problems, although not limited to.

Even though this expression is also widely used in the height of positive events, we would also notice this quite often during hard times.

During trying events, the message “Thank you for all the love and support” may be used to imply that we are grateful for the people who respect our silence.

Example:

I went through a roller-coaster of emotions in the last month. For that, I haven’t been able to reply to most of your direct messages. Thank you for respecting my silence. Please know that I’m in a better place now. Thank you for all the love and support!

 

5. Thank you for being there for me.

Much warmer than the other expressions listed above, “Thank you for being there for me” is something we would use with the best and closest people around us.

Short and simple, “Thank you for being there for me” may be used after receiving support from people during hard times like an immediate relative’s death or any other form of separation.

Example:

For those people who checked in on me during my hard times, thank you for being there for me. I may not have been able to give you updates in the last couple of weeks because of my situation, but rest assured I appreciate all the love and support you’ve given. 

 

6. Thank you for thinking of me.

Like “Thank you for being there for me,” “Thank you for thinking of me” bears a warm and genuinely grateful connotation too.

As this expression conveys a lot of warmth and personalization, it is best to reserve this for people that we meanwhile truthfully care about, like a best friend, cousin, or sibling.

Here’s how “Thank you for thinking of me” works in context:

Example:

Thank you for thinking of me, Gina. You are truly one of the few best people within my circle. To be honest, I’m still in the process of slowly socializing again after what happened. But rest assured, I’ll be able to get back on my feet after a little more time. Once again, thank you for being there.

 

7. Thanks for checking up on me.

“Thanks for checking up on me” has an even more reduced formality level than “Thank you for checking up on me.”

Sometimes, especially with those people whom we share cordial relationships with, we might have the urge to craft sincere messages out of reciprocity and respect.

Using “thanks” instead of “thank you” may bode well if we are communicating with slightly more distant individuals compared to close friends and family members.

Here’s how you may use “Thanks for checking up on me”:

Example:

Thanks for checking up on me when I was at my lowest point. You made me realize how important it is to cope with what I’m dealing with right now. I may not have the energy to socialize again within the next couple of weeks or months, but I’ll make sure you won’t have to worry about me again anytime soon.

 

8. Your message means a lot to me.

When sending a message to an individual, “Your message means a lot to me” is a great immediate response.

This is a great expression to use if we want to focus our gratitude on the particular message sent by the person rather than the act of messaging or the person per se.

That said, “Your message means a lot to me” is great for avoiding sending mixed signals to those who may have the tendency to misinterpret our gratitude message.

Here’s an example of its usage:

Example:

Hi, Josh. Your message means a lot to me. You’ve always been a great friend, and thank you for that, too. Please take care of yourself as well.

 

9. That’s very kind of you.

Another simple way of responding to messages of concern is “That’s very kind of you.” Using this expression may help you avoid explaining your situation in great detail via text.

Sometimes, we may not feel like explaining things through chat because we may feel like talking with someone in person is better.

Upon agreeing to meet up or simply sharing the problem with your friend, you may tell him or her “looking forward to talking to you” somewhere within the that’s-very-kind-of-you message.

Example:

Hi, Bret. Sorry. I’ve just read your message. That’s very kind of you. Yes, I would love to meet you over lunch this weekend to talk about what I’ve been going through. Looking forward to talking to you!

 

10. A huge thank you. You are the best!

Should we want to convey more love and care to our message receiver, the expression “A huge thank you” followed by “You are the best!” would be great.

Using “A huge thank you” alone may come off as a little redundant or common, but adding the second message particularly makes it warmer.

This short message is also effective for implicitly trying to avoid further explanations about whatever we are going through.

Example:

I got your message, Pam. A huge thank you! You are the best. Please know that I’ll reach out to you if I need to.

 

11. What would I do without you?

If you are looking for something more pleasant-sounding, the question “What would I do without you?” may convey something as such.

Of course, we have to reserve this kind of message for those people whom we truly care about or those we couldn’t really live without.

Here’s an example of how this expression might be used:

Example:

Reading all of your kind messages has truly helped me cope with what I’m going through. And for that, what would I do without you? I’m really proud to have friends like you, guys! Thank you so much.

 

Formal ways to say “Thank you for checking on me”

Formal messages related to “Thank you for checking on me” are meanwhile observed in email writing contexts or in any other work-related discussions.

For sure, there are a lot of different ways to say “thank you” in the business world apart from “Thank you for checking on me.”

To show some specific examples of how the formal language works in terms of sending gratitude messages, here’s a list of relatively formal expressions for your reference:

 

12. Thank you for your concern.

“Thank you for your concern” is a formal way of saying “Thank you for checking on me” in email writing.

It may not necessarily convey exactly the same meaning, but it does imply a similar message as well as tone.

Using “Thank you for your concern” tells your message receiver that you appreciate their behavior. Doing so positively reinforces the relationship between the two of you.

You may also continue the message with “looking forward to seeing you soon” or “looking forward to getting back to work,” if applicable.

Example:

Dear Miss Jane, 
 
Thank you for your concern, Miss Jane. I was discharged yesterday, and I am at home now. I was advised to take some more rest for a couple of days to fully recover. I should be back to work by Monday next week.

 

Looking forward to seeing you.

 

Yours truly,

 

Mildred

 

13. Thanks for your concern.

If you’re worried that “Thank you for your concern” may come off as a little too formal because your message is directed to a rather close colleague, you may also choose “Thanks for your concern.”

Using “thanks” instead of the fuller version “thank you” is the key to neutralizing the formality level of the previous expression given.

That said, “Thanks for your concern” works well with people from same-level positions whom you have just started working with.

Example:

Dear Arthur, 
 
Thanks for your concern, Arthur. Things have not been that good in the past couple of weeks due to my father’s passing, but I could say that I feel better now. I’m looking forward to seeing you again next week at the office.

 

Best regards,

 

Sandra

 

14. Thank you for reaching out to me.

“Thank you for reaching out to me” also bodes well in email writing. Not only limited to the context of today’s discussion, this expression also occurs a lot in other gratitude-related situations.

This response may likely happen when the other person starts his or her email message with “I am reaching out to you.”

Clearly, there are also many other ways to say “I am reaching out to you” to avoid sounding repetitive like a broken record.

Here’s an example of how to say “Thank you for checking on me” in the sense of “Thank you for reaching out to me”:

Example:

Dear Mr. Miller, 
 
Thank you for reaching out to me, sir. I and my family are doing better now than in the last couple of weeks. The typhoon has wrecked some of the houses in our neighborhood, but our house has not been seriously damaged. We only sustained minor destruction of our plants and trees, which only needs some cleaning up. As discussed, I should be able to report back to work next Monday.

 

Thank you for understanding.

 

Sincerely,

 

Myrna Johnson

 

15. Thank you for the kind words.

Another great expression to use instead of “Thank you for checking on me” is “Thank you for the kind words.”

This one particularly highlights the depth or weight of “the message” that the other person is sending rather than “the act” of sending the message.

With this emphasis, you are always on the safe side. It means that you won’t likely get into trouble out of being either too formal or too casual.

Example:

Dear Colleagues, 
 
Thank you for the kind words. My mother is still in a coma at the moment, and we are all preparing ourselves for the worst in the next couple of days. Due to this, I may not be able to respond to your messages as soon as I can in the coming days, and I would like to apologize in advance for that.

 

Thank you for understanding my situation.

 

Respectfully,

 

Pat

 

16. Thank you for your kind words.

In “Thank you for the kind words,” the determiner “the” is used before the phrase “kind words.” This also contributes to the neutral connotation of the previously suggested expression.

In case you would like to sound slightly warmer or less distant to your message receiver, you may simply change the word “the” into “your.”

Doing so would likely remove the stoical connotation brought by being quite formal and distant through language use.

In short, “Thank you for your kind words” is great for emailing a valued colleague rather than just an acquaintance.

Example:

Dear Sylvia, 
 
Thank you for your kind words. I am currently waiting for my visa’s approval, which should be available within the week or the next. I have also enjoyed working with you over the last several years. You are not only a great colleague but also a great friend.

 

If you need any help regarding the tasks I used to do, please feel free to reach out anytime via email.

 

Sincerely,

 

Helen

 

17. Thank you for your support.

Another expression that won’t let you down in email writing contexts is “Thank you for your support.”

Short, direct, and formal all at once, “Thank you for your support” is a great expression to use especially when some concrete form of assistance is offered.

This assistance may either be financial, emotional, or physical in nature among others, which is common in workplace settings. 

Example:

Dear All, 
 
Thank you for your support during these hard times. I truly feel better knowing that you are all willing to help me out both financially and emotionally. Please know that I sincerely appreciate your gesture.

 

Thank you, once again.

 

Warmest regards,

 

Paul

 

18. Your support is greatly appreciated.

If you think “Thank you for your support” might be slightly straightforward, you may also go with “Your support is greatly appreciated.”

Another trick you can bear in mind in terms of formal writing would be that the passive voice is more formal than the active voice.

“Your support is greatly appreciated” omits an understood “by me” phrase at the end. Using this structure highlights the act of supporting rather than you appreciating the support given. 

Example:

Dear Teammates, 
 
Thank you for reaching out to me. Your support is greatly appreciated not only by me but also by my family. You make our situation less hard to bear. Rest assured we will be able to get through what we are going through at the moment.

 

Sincerely yours,

Marie

 

19. Your support means so much to me.

However, if you think that “Your support is greatly appreciated” may come off as a little insincere, then feel free to increase its warmth.

You can do so by writing “Your support means so much to me” instead, which is still formal yet also warm at the same time.

This expression can be used for someone who proactively offers any form of assistance even if you are not necessarily planning to take one.

Example:

Dear Wynona, 
 
Thank you for your email. Your support means so much to me, especially now that I am at one of my lowest points in life. If I need anything urgent, I will reach out to you. 

 

Thank you, once again.

 

Kind regards,

 

Ryan

 

20. I really appreciate your support.

Finally, to even show more authenticity or sincerity through your written words, you may also opt for “I really appreciate your support.”

Using the pronoun “I” in the context of gratitude-giving is neither selfish nor conceited at all. Instead, this shows more personalization to your message receiver.

When paired with the determiner “your” towards the end, this gratitude expression should be an effective tool for giving the recipient the courtesy he or she is entitled to.

Example:

Dear Tim, 
 
Thank you for reaching out. I really appreciate your support and understanding. I may need to extend my leave of absence for a week or so because my dad still needs my assistance after getting discharged today. Rest assured I will be able to find medical help within the next week to take over my role. Until I get back to work, please do not hesitate to communicate with me via email for any clarifications regarding your tasks.

 

Thank you for understanding.

 

Yours sincerely,

 

Joseph Canon

 

Conclusion

No matter how hard life can become, we always have to remember that there are people out there who also grieve when they see us suffer.

For that, sending a short and simple message like “Thank you for checking on me” can actually make a lot of difference.

 

Frequently Asked Questions on “Other Ways to Say ‘Thank You for Checking on Me’”

 

What does “checking on me” mean?

To “check on” someone means to reach out to see whether the person is doing well. It is a casual expression used in direct messaging platforms as well as social media wall pages.

 

How can we respond to “Thank you for checking on me”?

Some casual ways to respond to “Thank you for checking on me” include “it’s nothing,” “don’t mention it,” and “no problem.” A more personalized response would be “you don’t have to thank me at all,” “I’m here for you,” or “you can always count on me.”

 

What is the difference between “checking up” and “checking in” on someone?

“Checking up” on someone often implies an investigative or inquisitive tone, whereas “checking in” on someone likely suggests a friendly or concerned tone.